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kalam
Journeyman III

windows 11

we went windows 11 support in ryzen 3 2200g please .........

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13 Replies
PocketDerg
Adept II

Re: windows 11

If your CPU doesn't have a TPM, you will have to get one onto your motherboard.
Otherwise Windows 11 isn't going to run if you don't cheese it to work

radeonpog gaming
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impressionville
Journeyman III

Re: windows 11

Really, It's a great experience using Windows 11, me also want to install on my PC

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sammyg
Adept II

Re: windows 11

Is it 64-bit compatible? Does it have at least 1 GHz and 2 cores? Then it will work.

You will also need 4 GB of RAM, UEFI firmware, Secure Boot, TPM 2.0, at least DirectX 12 GPU, and a 720p display.

Oh and Internet connection! Naturally. So they can force you to create one of them "Microsoft Account" accounts during setup, as opposed to one of them "offline account" accounts.

That's right, starting with Windows 11 you will need Internet access to begin installing it.

At least this is advertised to be true for the "Home" edition, maybe the Pro edition will be different. But I bet Windows 12 will force you to only install with a Microsoft account! More so, it will probably force you to install it rather than something else like a Linux based operating system. Heh, by 2026 Windows itself will morph into a Linux based operating system, with proprietary sugar coating on top of it.

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sammyg
Adept II

Re: windows 11

Looks like you're out of luck. It's not on Microsoft's list of supported AMD processors.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/design/minimum/supported/windows-11-supported-amd-...

However, I don't know exactly what criteria they use to add processors to that list. It might be that they use "fTPM" (firmware TPM) as a criteria, and if your processor does not have this feature, then maybe they don't list it. Again, I don't know what criteria they use, they just list a bunch of processors, they don't say anything more than that.

If lack of fTPM support is the only reason your 2200G is not supported, then you can simply buy a discrete TPM module and install it on your motherboard. This of course requires that your motherboard has that TPM header, but most high-end and even some mid-range motherboards do. Be sure to buy the correct one, it's either LPC (low pin count) or SPI (serial peripheral interface). I will give you examples of such modules from Asus below.

SPI:

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards-Components/Motherboards/Accessories/TPM-SPI/

PLC:

https://www.asus.com/Motherboards-Components/Motherboards/Accessories/TPM-M-R2-0/

Actually I may purchase one of these myself. Even though my processor has firmware based TPM support. I have two Intel processor and two AMD. Intel calls this PTT (Platform Trust Technology). I just want to add some separation of concern and isolation.

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sammyg
Adept II

Re: windows 11

Thanks for editing your post and clarifying kingfish. I was going to say congratulations, you've posted a link.

kingfish
MVP

Re: windows 11

I think I just got lucky.....
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sammyg
Adept II

Re: windows 11

Kingfish, what's your take from all that?

I have not read all of it, to be honest, maybe first four paragraphs.

There's too much information in that article, too much jargon and misuse of terms and acronyms for me to take more interest in reading it. I am not going to design my own Windows 11 computer from resistors, transistors, capacitors and diodes to need that kind of detailed information.

Also, it's embarrassing to see that the Microsoft person doesn't know the difference between a processor and a chipset, and that they don't know what makes a second generation AMD Ryzen processor. Not too good source of information there in any case, so best not to read it. That's where I lost interest.

 

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kingfish
MVP

Re: windows 11

Honestly, this seems like a typical Microsoft roll-out. Confusion, mis-information, and rumors. By 2022 it will 'probably' be sorted.

""Right now, it isn’t even 100 percent clear if this is a CPU problem or a chipset problem. Some Microsoft executives have referred to lockouts as chipset-based:""

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