Mark Papermaster, CTO, and SVP for Technology & Engineering

 

This week, two new consortia, with AMD support, announced open standard development efforts targeting high-performance interconnect technologies inside future servers and datacenters. A third consortium, CCIX, which was announced in May and counts AMD as a founding member, released its first specification and welcomed new members.

 

AMD participation in these three standards bodies should come as no surprise, as we have a long history of supporting open standards in technology development. Our leadership in helping form the HSA Foundation to make programming heterogeneous computing devices easier is one example of this commitment. Additionally, the recent establishment of GPUOpen provides developers with free, open development tools and software for PC games, computer-generated images and GPU compute applications.

 

The latest announcements reinforce the shared goal of consortia members to bring open standards into the datacenter. While there are unique aspects to each at the technical level, there are also many similarities, and many of the participating companies, like AMD, are members of all three.At the engineering level, the standards can generally be distinguished this way:

 

Gen-Z is focused on an optimized solution for rack-scale connections to memory and accelerators as an open alternative to the proprietary Omni-Path.

 

OpenCAPI targets connections to IBM’s POWER architecture with memory and accelerators. AMD is focused on getting our Radeon Technologies Group products into this ecosystem by joining this effort.

 

CCIX is primarily a coherent processor-to-accelerator interconnect that leverages the existing PCIe® physical interconnect ecosystem.

 

Members of all three organizations are committed to an open approach to speed innovation and collaboration versus existing proprietary and closed standards. Future innovation will be critical to taking computing into the next decade and beyond as big data analytics, machine learning and other applications with extremely high computational needs become more prevalent.

 

I encourage you learn more about each organization from their respective announcements. Through these efforts, we are setting a solid foundation for customers and partners to support our “Zen”-based server platforms and AMD Radeon™ Pro Graphics for compute, as well as their follow-ons, long into the future!

 

Mark Papermaster is CTO, and SVP for Technology & Engineering at AMD. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.