13 Replies Latest reply on Sep 18, 2018 4:08 PM by blackmaninc

    AMD performance monitoring is not accurate

    blackmaninc

      According to AMD, Hitman (2016) used up to 6 gbs as vram, but according to computer techs I spoke with, this is impossible since I have a 4 gb GPU. If the monitor is connected to the GPU, it would never use shared memory, only the dedicated memory on the GPU. MSI Afterburner seems to closely reflect this. Both of them can't be right, either Afterburner is wrong, or AMD is wrong.

       

      AMD:

       

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      Afterburner:

       

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        • Re: AMD performance monitoring is not accurate
          black_zion

          Page file usage also counts as VRAM usage in some programs, since unneeded graphical items are stored there for quick access if they are needed again. The size dedicated to it is usually half your video card's memory.

            • Re: AMD performance monitoring is not accurate
              blackmaninc

              But why count it if it isn't relevant to the game itself? There should be a separate section for page file usage and another for video ram. It had me assuming I was using shared memory or something when it actually isn't at all. What does page file usage have to do with video games?

                • Re: AMD performance monitoring is not accurate
                  pokester

                  I get what you are saying it really is more the texture size being used which is more than the card has. It isn't wrong, it just spills over to other memory when it runs out. Not necessarily a page file either if plenty of system ram is available it can be there too. In reality if you were going to document where every piece of information is at any given time in the process, your performance monitor would probably need a bigger screen than your game. Sounds like one is really reporting how much ram is being asked for based on texture size (and anything else that goes to vram) and the other is showing how much is actually being used on the card, both are likely right in their own way.

                   

                  Now a page file and video games. The game will write textures to the Video Cards VRAM, if it runs our it will write to the systems ram, SDRAM. When you run out of system ram, the system will page to disk, either a SSD (faster) or spinning disk (way slower) if that is still what you use. So when it comes to a Game it goes to VRam, if you don't have enough, it will write to you SDRAM (system memory) if that happens and your are then out of system SDRAM the system will decide what it then pages to the page file.

                  • Re: AMD performance monitoring is not accurate
                    black_zion

                    It's why it's listed in task manager like it is, though as you can see the "shared GPU memory" of mine is 8GB. As for what the page file has to do with it, graphical assets are generated as they are needed, such as when you load a map area or level, and then when you move to another area or level, the unneeded assets are shifted out of fast VRAM and into the page file, or actually first into RAM if you have the space because it's not 2005 anymore and we all have more than 4GB of the stuff, and then into the page file if you run out of allocated RAM, as it is far quicker than having to generate them all over again.

                     

                      • Re: AMD performance monitoring is not accurate
                        blackmaninc

                        Yeah, I see that the game actually is using shared GPU memory in my task manager while playing games. So it uses page file memory and system ram, whatever it takes to keep the game running smoothly apparently. This explains why game companies will always recommending at least 16 gbs of system ram for the most demanding games. It was using at least 1 gb of shared memory while playing Hitman for instance, the rest of that may have been page file memory.

                         

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