11 Replies Latest reply on Aug 29, 2018 12:55 AM by fnordie

    why is my 2600x with 95W TDP is running much hotter than my previous FX 6350 wich had 125W?

    fnordie

      never got near 70c on FX.

       

      handbreak brings my ryzen 2600x to +90c in under 5 minutes. wraith spire

        • Re: why is my 2600x with 95W TDP is running much hotter than my previous FX 6350 wich had 125W?
          misterj

          fnordie, there are many threads here about CPU temperatures.  I answer one or two a day.  Your specifications:

          2600X.jpg

          You should measure CPU temperature ONLY with Ryzen Master.  The default profile (tab) is read only and will not OC you rig.  Enjoy, John.

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          • Re: why is my 2600x with 95W TDP is running much hotter than my previous FX 6350 wich had 125W?
            psychotic_pedagogue

            This is a common misunderstanding about TDP and what it means. A 95W TDP (Thermal Design Power) means that if you build a PC with it you need to design a cooling setup capable of dissipating at least 95w to maintain normal operation, under normal environmental variables (ie, room air temperatures). 'Normal operation' means running at the advertised base speeds, which in the case of the 2600x is 3.6Ghz.

             

            However, this says nothing about how hot the chip gets, how much power it uses, or what temperature the chip safely can run at - that's all listed separately. The FX-6350 has a listed maximum temperature of 61'c, so it needs a higher capacity cooler to keep it under that temperature. The 2600X on the other hand has a specced maximum temperature of 95'C, so even if it uses the same amount of power it doesn't need as much to cool it. This is reflected in part in the TDP.

             

            The X series processors use XFR and Precision Boost, and if they're running cool they will draw more power to push themselves faster - which in turn means they'll draw way more power and generate more heat than the TDP specification suggests if they safely can. Precision Boost Overdrive will raise the limits on how much power they allow themselves to use, so you basically have a processor that's overclocking itself whenever it's below the maximum temperature. That in turn means it will spend a lot more time at or near its maximum temperature than an older processor will, by design. Putting a beefier cooler on doesn't change that until the cooler gets beefy enough that the CPU can't boost any higher. My CPU cooler has a 300W theoretical dissipation capacity, but the CPU can still get up to the mid seventies under synthetic loads.

             

            Most people think that TDP = Power consumption = heat. They're related, but it's more involved that that.

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