4 Replies Latest reply on Mar 15, 2018 2:25 PM by ajlueke

    With AMD FreeSync support, games will look their best on Xbox One S, Xbox One X

    kingfish

      With AMD FreeSync support, games will look their best on Xbox One S, Xbox One X

       

      " The Xbox One’s latest update is bringing several new features to the console, including new options for Mixer streaming and resolution settings. But another addition could make your games look significantly better: AMD Radeon FreeSync support for enabled monitors.

      FreeSync is a technology used in select AMD processors and displays that causes your monitor and gaming system to sync their refresh rates. Previously, it was a feature only available to PC players, but the update adds FreeSync support to both the Xbox One S and the Xbox One X. With FreeSync enabled, you should see reduced visual artifacts and screen-tearing in your games, resulting in a much more pleasant experience. The effect should apply regardless of your game’s frame rate, so you should still be able to boost performance when playing on the Xbox One X.

      To allow FreeSync to work properly, all you need to do is go into the Xbox One’s “display & sound” settings and select the box labeled, “allow variable refresh rate.”

      FreeSync monitors are available from a number of different manufacturers, including Asus, LG, and Samsung. They aren’t cheap, but if you already play games on a PC and want to hook up your Xbox in an area other than your living room, they’re a worthwhile option. Many are also extremely low-latency, and the updated FreeSync 2 monitors also support HDR. The Xbox One S and Xbox One X will both support this version of the technology, so your colors will still be just as vibrant as they were on a traditional HDR-enabled display. Just make sure the monitor you choose has an HDMI input, as some of the models only use DisplayPort.

      If you’re a member of the Xbox Insider Alpha Ring, it’s likely you already have FreeSync enabled on your Xbox One S or X. For everyone else, we should be seeing it later this spring. Along with FreeSync, the update adds a new version of Microsoft Edge for browsing the web, as well as new tools for starting tournaments and organizing communities. Mixer streamers can even allow viewers to take over their game for them if they’re stuck at a particularly tough spot."

        • Re: With AMD FreeSync support, games will look their best on Xbox One S, Xbox One X
          pokester

          My son has this new X Box and in case anyone wonders as this says make sure to get one with HDMI, we have and HDMI to display port cable and it works fine.

          • Re: With AMD FreeSync support, games will look their best on Xbox One S, Xbox One X
            ajlueke

            Unless Freesync actually starts showing up in TVs it is a moot point.  I doubt the average user will be hooking their Xbox up to a computer monitor.  Unless of course it is a BFGD style monitor NVidia is putting out later this year.

              • Re: With AMD FreeSync support, games will look their best on Xbox One S, Xbox One X
                pokester

                there are tv's with the tech being built in, many of them are just being called "variable refresh rate" settings. A standard that AMD built FreeSync upon. So tv's with this will be benefited by cards that are Free Sync capable. I don't know that G-Sync helps in this situation, I don't doubt we will see or that those tvs exist now too.

                  • Re: With AMD FreeSync support, games will look their best on Xbox One S, Xbox One X
                    ajlueke

                    I am always leery towards monitors or TVs that will only feature adaptive sync or variable fresh rate, because that is actually not a standard.  A TV can be called variable refresh or adaptive without supporting a specific range of refesh rates, or even meet any specific performance metrics.  That is were Freesync is superior, as a monitor/TV will actually have to meet AMDs specifications to get the Freesync badge.  Without it, it is really a crapshoot in what you are getting and how well it performs.

                     

                    The NVidia solution is actually superior in my eyes, as they are putting out "monitors" that are TV sized.  That means fully GSync support, but the displays will also be missing the redundant secondary Smart TV OS found in TVs.  That is something you really shouldn't be putting money towards if you are hooking up and PC or gaming console that provides identical streaming features.  Also cut out is a tuner, which is again just a waste of money.  The problem is, Gsync based displays do nothing for console gamers, so I would like AMD could leverage their position in the major consoles and get TV manufacturers to create Freesync/Freesync 2 certified TVs, or get monitor manufacturers to develop Freesync BFGD style displays.

                     

                    This is the kind of synergy I have been waiting for since I hooked up my Commodore 64 to a TV with an RF adapter.