1 Reply Latest reply on Mar 6, 2018 4:21 AM by darkwolfca

    Molten Monolith Mk 2

    ajlueke

      Description

      This is an update to my monolith build using the new Lian-Li PC-V3000 case.

       

      Specifications

      CPURyzen R7 1800X at 4.00GHz (P0 overclock)
      CoolerCustom EKWB Loop
      MotherboardASRock 370x Fata1ty Professional Gaming
      MemoryCorsair Dominator Platinum CMD32GX4M4C3200C14C (3200 MHz CL14)
      GraphicsGigabyte RX Vega Air (EKWB water block and backplate)
      Disc Drive 1Samsung 960 Evo (1TB)
      Disc Drive 2Samsung 830 (250GB)
      Disc Drive 3Wester Digital Green (3 TB)
      PSUCorsair AX860
      CaseLian-Li PC-V3000
      MonitorAcer XF270HU

       

      Hello all.  This is a continued update of my Monolith build.  The original Monolith chronicled my update to Ryzen 7 from an FX-8350 based build and can be found here.  Monolith

       

      After being inspired by other users on this site, I modded my ABS Canyon 695 (Rebadged Lian-Li TYR PC-X2000) to allow for my first custom loop.  Those exploits are detailed here.  Molten Monolith

       

      This fall, I noticed Lian-Li had released an updated PC case, in the old X1000 line call the PC-V3000.  Since I loved the PC-X2000 so much (been using it since 2009), I decided to give the new case a go.  My modded case also had a few limitations.  The radiators were rather undersized, which necessitated higher fan speeds and more noise that I was hoping for.  I was hoping for superior acoustics with the new case.  In any event, I decide to make the jump.  Below is a picture of the final result!

       

      DSC04523.JPG

      I used most of the existing parts from the previous Molten Monolith build.  However, since the PC-V3000 did not have a 5.25" drive bay, I added an upright reservoir to my pump setup.  Also, the 280mm radiator was used for the CPU this time, and a 420mm radiator was added to the front facing exhaust port for the GPU.  Noctua Chromax fans were used across this build and all connected to PWM capable ports.  I set the fan curves to start at 1000rpm, which should give me an acoustic profile well under 30 db.

       

      I set my p-state overclock on my CPU to 4.0 GHz, opened up hardware monitor, and then started the CPUz stress test for over and hour.  After that, I check the max temp using those low rpm fan curves.

       

      Hwinfo.PNG

      The CPU temp never exceeded 42C according to HWinfo, which is an excellent result.  At 4.0 Ghz the Ryzen 7 1800x is consuming 125W, which is easily dissipated by the 280mm radiator out the top of the case.  Next, I play around with the new adrenaline drivers a bit to take a look at GPU performance.

       

      I ran my Vega 64 in balanced mode and overclocked to take a look at thermal performance.  For the overclock, I raised the power limit by 50%, raised memory from 945 Mhz to 1025Mhz, and gave the P6, P7 clock speeds a minor 20 Mhz boost.  I then loaded up Destiny 2 ta 2560x1440 at max settings. and ran through a single strike in the strike playlist while recording with the adrenaline drivers.  The results are shown below.

       

      Graphics.PNG

       

      In balanced mode, my Vega maxed out at 35C while averaging 27C.  With my overclocked setting, the results are a bit higher, with an average of 34C (nearly the max of balanced mode!) and a max of 40C.  The additional power used (278 Watts versus 210 Watts) allows for a decent clockspeed bump.  All in all, thermal performance is excellent.  None of the fans needed to spin up from their base 1000 rpm setting.

       

      Just one more shot of the build powered up!  I am extremely happy with the result.  The thermals are amazing, and I can barely tell this ting is on.

       

      DSC04527.JPG