11 Replies Latest reply on Dec 11, 2017 4:06 PM by ajlueke

    Upgrade from fx6350 - Ryzen 5 1600x Recommendation?

    alexander_walter.exe

      I've been throwing around the idea of building a new system from the ground up as a replacement to the FX system I've used for years.

      My main question is for the money (especially with the cost of DDR4 Ram) Will I get much of a performance gain from it? I know Zen is leaps and bounds better than Bulldozer but my main question would be for my use cases.  I'm listing programs and games I use the PC for below, current specs, and Ryzen Machine specs. Any experience or opinions with a similar system would be great!

       

      I use the computer for programs like Microsoft Visual Studio, Android Developer, Access w/ Visual Basic Editor, GIMP 2

       

      I play games like Rocket League (60+fpson highest settings), ES Skyrim (60ish fps on High), Need For Speed 2015 (40ish fps on medium)

       

       

                          Current Machine                    Ryzen Machine

      cpu               Fx 6350 @4.0gz                   R5 1600X or 1600

      gpu               RX 460                                 GeForce 1060 6g (unless anyone has experience with the rumored issues AMD/NVIDIA cpu/gpu pairs)

      ram             16g                                        16g

      drives          2 HDDs                                 1SSD (boot), 1HDD

      mboard        Asus-somethingorother       Asrock W/B350 Chipset

      monitor       Dual 1920x1080                    Dual 1920x1080

       

      I know this is really specific so if you have another view please go ahead and post it! I'm really back and forth on this so any input would be great!

      This thread could just be about upgrading from AM3+ and I'd be fine with that

        • Re: Upgrade from fx6350 - Ryzen 5 1600x Recommendation?
          black_zion

          Too many variables to give you a direct answer. Ryzen is a good 50% faster per clock than Bulldozer derived processors, the GTX 1060 6GB is well over twice as fast as the RX 460, and an SSD is going to slaughter loading times.

          • Re: Upgrade from fx6350 - Ryzen 5 1600x Recommendation?
            alexander_walter.exe

            Yeah there a lot of variables for sure - just wondering if someone has a similar system and what their experience is with it? like if anyone else plays Skyrim on a ryzen 5 with a 1060 what they get etc etc

            • Re: Upgrade from fx6350 - Ryzen 5 1600x Recommendation?
              alexander_walter.exe

              the fps listed are what I get currently! sorry I wasn't too clear on that - like if anyone with experience on a ryzen 5 would say its worth the money to upgrade for the improvements.

               

              I don't use eyfinity, and I got some good ol' 60hz monitors, nothing special.

                • Re: Upgrade from fx6350 - Ryzen 5 1600x Recommendation?
                  leyvin

                  Over the past 2 years I've gone from a Phenom II X4 940 (OC 3.40GHz) to A10 7850K (OC 4.30GHz) and finally an R5 1600 (Stock 3.5GHz).

                  Now honestly the Phenom II was starting to really feel it's age since I'd got it back in 2008,. and while it perhaps would've made more sense to go with an FX 6350 or 8350 (given both the Phenom II and FX-Series use AM3+, so my Motherboard did support it) ... at the time I really just wanted SSE 4.1 Support and was toying with DirectX 12 Multi-GPU Functionality,. which the A10 APU (GCN 2.0 / 8 CU) along with the R7 360 I'd got the year before (GCN 2.0 / 14 CU) just made a lot of sense as a "Cheap and Cheerful" Multi-Purpose Rig.

                   

                  I'd been planning a Ryzen build since it had been announced,. and realistically the Bulldozer / Piledriver Architecture (as best I could tell) wasn't exactly a noticeable upgrade over the Phenom II outside of the modern features that most Developers weren't really using for Games. As such the extra performance came entirely from Higher Clocks.

                   

                  This showcased fairly noticeably in CPU-Z Bench,. as the Synthetics were:

                  Phenom II X4 940 / 685 ST / 2250 MT (4C / 4T)

                  A10 7850K / 1340 ST / 4850 MT (4C / 4T) [235 ST / 812 MT]

                  R5 1600 / 2025 ST / 12225 MT (6C / 12T) [402 ST / 3327 MT]

                   

                  I've not benched the Phenom II on CPU-Z 1.79+ where they changed the Benchmark Routines,. but I have included those scores in brackets. In this regard you can bench your current CPU to see how it stacks up in terms of performance.

                   

                  Now as a note Intel Processors (7-Series and 8-Series) typically will hit ~420 - 440 ST (Stock).. this will provide better performance in Single Threaded (older OpenGL / DirectX 9 / DirectX 11) Games. Although by how much is somewhat academic,. as it can be as much as 10% but you'll more typically see 2-3%... so maybe an extra Frame or two... still they also run notably hotter, thus if you're using Air Cooling they'll be louder. So, it's really a trade off there.

                  I'd say the R5 1600 still presents the best Value for Performance,. especially with the Included Wraith Cooler, which even at 100% isn't overly loud and has a much more please Hum than Jet Engine sound... only wish I could say the same for my ASUS RX 480 Dual,. which does sound like a Jet on a runway under load. It's the first time I went ASUS over Sapphire,. not likely to make that mistake again ... still I got it for £165 instead of £220, so eh swings and roundabouts.

                   

                  One thing I will say,. although you probably know this as an AMD Consumer... is when it comes to Memory, make absolutely sure you're running in Dual Channel rather than Single Channel Mode. (i.e. 8GB get 2x4GB not 1x8GB)

                  While on Intel this doesn't make much of a difference,. on AMD (Ryzen is no exception) this reduces latency and vastly improves caching performance. Also on said note also don't fall into the pitfall of assuming that Faster Memory is better... because it isn't,. the Clock Speed of the Memory isn't actually as important as the Clock Latency. You want the Lowest Latency Memory you can get.

                  A lot of people go for Corsair or G-Skill,. this is a BIG mistake. You want Kingston / Hynix Hyper-X FURY,. preferably something like 2666MHz CL12 or 3200MHz CL14.

                  All the Clock itself does is improve the Total Throughput,. which you'll frankly never even come close to hitting in ANY Scenario... the Lower Latency however improves the Cache Speed on Hyper-Transport.

                   

                  Typical Systems I've seen people being proud of silly Throughput numbers while they have 78 - 82ns Latency,. where-as I've much lower throughput but 60 - 65ns Latency. For Gaming this will improve Loading Times, Reduce Micro-Stutter, and improve Framerate Lows,. but where it shines for Ryzen is in Multi-Threaded Application, such-as Visual Studio, Blender, Maya, Substance, Photoshop, etc... noticeable increasing performance... the same is true when you're running half a dozen applications, browser tabs, etc. before the system starts to show performance issues in Multi-Tasking.

                   

                  If you are using said System for Workloads,. not just Gaming.

                  I would honestly much more highly recommend an RX x70 / x80 (8GB) over a GTX 1060 6GB... with 16GB System Memory.

                  Yes, you will be trading about 5-10% Framerate in Older Games,. but the larger VRAM does make a noticeable difference when it comes to Work Applications... as is the substantially greater (up to 20%) Compute Performance,. especially when the Driver is set to Compute Workload Mode (which you can setup a Profile Switch per Application / Game).

                   

                  Also as a note the ASUS B350 Prime Motherboard,. does support Multi-GPU / Crossfire... the Secondary GPU will be running on PCI-E 3.0 x2 instead of x8 (like you would have on an X370) but that actually is enough for the RX 460.

                  At present I'm running an R7 360 as my Secondary GPU,. which is good for Multi-GPU Testing, Experiments, etc.

                  I'm not sure about said support in other Motherboards ... so the ASROCK may, or may not support such; just letting you know the Asus B350 Prime definitely does support Crossfire and SLI. Still it's always useful to be able to have a Single GPU Per Display / Desktop, as they won't affect each others Performance.

                   

                  Not sure if that's useful to you,. but always good to know.

                  1 of 1 people found this helpful
                    • Re: Upgrade from fx6350 - Ryzen 5 1600x Recommendation?
                      janefarloseen

                      leyvin wrote:

                       

                      Over the past 2 years I've gone from a Phenom II X4 940 (OC 3.40GHz) to A10 7850K (OC 4.30GHz) and finally an R5 1600 (Stock 3.5GHz).

                      Now honestly the Phenom II was starting to really feel it's age since I'd got it back in 2008,. and while it perhaps would've made more sense to go with an FX 6350 or 8350 (given both the Phenom II and FX-Series use AM3+, so my Motherboard did support it) ... at the time I really just wanted SSE 4.1 Support and was toying with DirectX 12 Multi-GPU Functionality,. which the A10 APU (GCN 2.0 / 8 CU) along with the R7 360 I'd got the year before (GCN 2.0 / 14 CU) just made a lot of sense as a "Cheap and Cheerful" Multi-Purpose Rig.

                       

                      I'd been planning a Ryzen build since it had been announced,. and realistically the Bulldozer / Piledriver Architecture (as best I could tell) wasn't exactly a noticeable upgrade over the Phenom II outside of the modern features that most Developers weren't really using for Games. As such the extra performance came entirely from Higher Clocks.

                       

                      This showcased fairly noticeably in CPU-Z Bench,. as the Synthetics were:

                      Phenom II X4 940 / 685 ST / 2250 MT (4C / 4T)

                      A10 7850K / 1340 ST / 4850 MT (4C / 4T) [235 ST / 812 MT]

                      R5 1600 / 2025 ST / 12225 MT (6C / 12T) [402 ST / 3327 MT]

                       

                      I've not benched the Phenom II on CPU-Z 1.79+ where they changed the Benchmark Routines,. but I have included those scores in brackets. In this regard you can bench your current CPU to see how it stacks up in terms of performance.

                       

                      Now as a note Intel Processors (7-Series and 8-Series) typically will hit ~420 - 440 ST (Stock).. this will provide better performance in Single Threaded (older OpenGL / DirectX 9 / DirectX 11) Games. Although by how much is somewhat academic,. as it can be as much as 10% but you'll more typically see 2-3%... so maybe an extra Frame or two... still they also run notably hotter, thus if you're using Air Cooling they'll be louder. So, it's really a trade off there.

                      I'd say the R5 1600 still presents the best Value for Performance,. especially with the Included Wraith Cooler, which even at 100% isn't overly loud and has a much more please Hum than Jet Engine sound... only wish I could say the same for my ASUS RX 480 Dual,. which does sound like a Jet on a runway under load. It's the first time I went ASUS over Sapphire,. not likely to make that mistake again ... still I got it for £165 instead of £220, so eh swings and roundabouts.

                       

                      One thing I will say,. although you probably know this as an AMD Consumer... is when it comes to Memory, make absolutely sure you're running in Dual Channel rather than Single Channel Mode. (i.e. 8GB get 2x4GB not 1x8GB)

                      While on Intel this doesn't make much of a difference,. on AMD (Ryzen is no exception) this reduces latency and vastly improves caching performance. Also on said note also don't fall into the pitfall of assuming that Faster Memory is better... because it isn't,. the Clock Speed of the Memory isn't actually as important as the Clock Latency. You want the Lowest Latency Memory you can get.

                      A lot of people go for Corsair or G-Skill,. this is a BIG mistake. You want Kingston / Hynix Hyper-X FURY,. preferably something like 2666MHz CL12 or 3200MHz CL14.

                      All the Clock itself does is improve the Total Throughput,. which you'll frankly never even come close to hitting in ANY Scenario... the Lower Latency however improves the Cache Speed on Hyper-Transport.

                       

                      Typical Systems I've seen people being proud of silly Throughput numbers while they have 78 - 82ns Latency,. where-as I've much lower throughput but 60 - 65ns Latency. For Gaming this will improve Loading Times, Reduce Micro-Stutter, and improve Framerate Lows,. but where it shines for Ryzen is in Multi-Threaded Application, such-as Visual Studio, Blender, Maya, Substance, Photoshop, etc... noticeable increasing performance... the same is true when you're running half a dozen applications, browser tabs, etc. before the system starts to show performance issues in Multi-Tasking.

                       

                      If you are using said System for Workloads,. not just Gaming.

                      I would honestly much more highly recommend an RX x70 / x80 (8GB) over a GTX 1060 6GB... with 16GB System Memory.

                      Yes, you will be trading about 5-10% Framerate in Older Games,. but the larger VRAM does make a noticeable difference when it comes to Work Applications... as is the substantially greater (up to 20%) Compute Performance,. especially when the Driver is set to Compute Workload Mode (which you can setup a Profile Switch per Application / Game).

                       

                      Also as a note the ASUS B350 Prime Motherboard,. does support Multi-GPU / Crossfire... the Secondary GPU will be running on PCI-E 3.0 x2 instead of x8 (like you would have on an X370) but that actually is enough for the RX 460.

                      At present I'm running an R7 360 as my Secondary GPU,. which is good for Multi-GPU Testing, Experiments, etc.

                      I'm not sure about said support in other Motherboards ... so the ASROCK may, or may not support such; just letting you know the Asus B350 Prime definitely does support Crossfire and SLI. Still it's always useful to be able to have a Single GPU Per Display / Desktop, as they won't affect each others Performance.

                       

                      Not sure if that's useful to you,. but always good to know.

                      Any one help me i have o graphic card but my pc support a heavy graphic games why this possibel?

                      http://www.couponacode.com/view/karmaloop

                      Karmaloop Discount Codes

                      • Re: Upgrade from fx6350 - Ryzen 5 1600x Recommendation?
                        alexander_walter.exe

                        This was really helpful - thanks for all the insight! And yes dual channel FTW with AMD.

                        I probably won't run multiple graphics cards as I only ever game on one 1080 screen at a time, and id say the system is used as a workstation about 60% of the time, gaming the other 40%. Would you recommend vega56 over a 580 for workloads? the power consumption of those make it seem like vega might be ridiculously noisy...

                      • Re: Upgrade from fx6350 - Ryzen 5 1600x Recommendation?
                        ajlueke

                        A GTX 1060, and the R5 1600X will certainly lift any bottlenecks you are experiencing.  The problem is, you are already getting at or close to 60fps in the games you play, which is the refresh rate of the monitors you employ.  The Ryzen/GTX pairing will certainly lift you above 60fps, but that will just lead to screen tearing without appropriate variable sync software (freesync or gsync).

                         

                        However, the Ryzen 5/GTX combo will keep you at 60fps in future games from quite some time, while that FX 6350/460 combo will invariably struggle more and more.  I'd say it is worth the investment, especially due to the AM4 platform being supported out to 2020.  It may be worth looking into g-sync monitor for the GTX 1060 as time and funds permit, or possibly an RX 580, freesync combo which would give similar performance.  Having upgraded to a 1440p 144Hz freesync monitor myself recently, I can say that it makes a sizeable difference.

                        1 of 1 people found this helpful