3 Replies Latest reply on Nov 5, 2017 3:06 PM by sageadvisor

    What's The Maximum Virtual Super Resolution On A 4K TV

    sageadvisor

      I tried to find the answer to this using Google and also the site search engine but haven't found it.

      I have 4x27" 1080p LCDs and Virtual Super Resolution is able to upscale those to 2560x1440. In fact 2 of the 4 screens can actually go to 3200x1800 but not all 4 so I just go with 2560x1440 so they're uniform. I'd like to buy a 65" 4K TV and eliminate all the bars between screens but if a 4K TV can only do 4K even with Virtual Super Resolution I'd be losing 43% of the resolution I have now which is a nonstarter for me but it sure would be nice to replace 4 screens with one if I could retain the resolution I have now and if I could even gain some lines that would be fantastic.

      So my question is can I use Virtual Super Resolution to bump the native resolution of a 4K screen. To my mind it would make sense that if the max resolution of a 1080p screen can be increased by 78% @2560x1440 and even 178% @3200x1800 that a 4K screen should be able to do better than 3840x2160 when a little 1080p screen can do almost as good on its own @3200x1800.

      I'm hoping at least.

      Thanks in advance for your knowledge and experience.

        • Re: What's The Maximum Virtual Super Resolution On A 4K TV
          hotrith

          for your answear, 4K TV´s can upscale to 5K-5120x2880 60hrz in VSR 16:9

            • Re: What's The Maximum Virtual Super Resolution On A 4K TV
              sageadvisor

              Thank you hotrith that's VERY helpful I appreciate it. That would be perfect since I wouldn't lose any resolution from what I've got now.

              I've got 3 GPUs in this system 2xGigabyte Radeon HD 7870s and an NVIDIA GTX660 I also asked this question to an NVIDIA "EXPERT" in a live chat and according to him it's a complete unknown what ANY 4K TV or 4K monitor can do short of buying it and trying it. According to him there is NO WAY to know what ANY device can do prior to buying it. He wouldn't even give me what you just gave me as POTENTIAL parameters. NO INDICATION OF ANYTHING. Not incredibly helpful believe me. I'm not impressed.

              Do you have any knowledge of what one would look for in a 4K TV prior to buying it just to make sure it would support the resolution you indicated.

              Just so I don't end up buying and having a 65" TV sent 2000 miles or more just to find out it can't do what I need it to do. Or do all 4K TV's support this degree of upscaling capability.

              I'm more than willing to upgrade my GPUs to support a higher resolution I just haven't had any reason to do so since I'm not a gamer at all and the GPUs I have are perfectly MORE than capable of supporting multiple monitors which is really all I need them to do but the NVIDIA rep did say that a GTX 1080 ti would support 7680x4320 per screen do you know if that is something that ANY displays at this point in time support or is it another case of future potential. If there are displays that support higher than 5K how would I know this BEFORE I buy. What would I look for in the specs for instance.

               

              Thanks again for the useful information.

              • Re: What's The Maximum Virtual Super Resolution On A 4K TV
                sageadvisor

                I can't see anything in any of the 4K TVs I've been researching that says they support anything more than 3840x2160. That's what they say for MAXIMUM resolution it's only because of the amazing tech of modern GPUs that we're able to go above that but it's not reflected on the specs of any TVs OR Monitors in fact. Like this one for example.

                Samsung UN65MU6500FXZA 65-Inch 4K Ultra HD Curved Smart TV with HDR Pro - Newegg.ca

                It just says MAXIMUM resolution 3840x2160 but there are 829 GPUs on Newegg's site that support 7680x4320 resolution. So how am I supposed to know what a TV Supports short of actually buying it? Is there really no way of knowing before you actually get it home no technical component or specification number that indicates and therefore determines what the maximum potential of a screen is?