1 Reply Latest reply on Aug 19, 2017 1:17 PM by black_zion

    Possible faulty PSU/Motherboard?

    carterturner

      Hello,

      I had no issues with it until a few weeks ago when I realized that my PC wouldn't turn on unless I flipped the PSU switch on and off.

      However I realized that if I turned the switch off after turning the computer off, I wouldn't have any issues booting it the next day/a few hours later...

      But things got a little tricky once my PC started to shut off while playing games. At first I thought it was some heat related issue so I checked my GPU (GTX 980) and CPU (I7 4790K) temps, no problems (They are both at 50/60 during heavy load). I then ran a benchmark (Superposition) to check the PSU's voltage and nothing was out of place (No values were too high/low).

      So next I ran a game, thinking my issue was fixed, and as soon as I began playing, my PC shuts off again... After that I have to switch off/on the PSU switch multiple time and press the power button to turn my PC on.

      I know this is without a doubt due to a faulty PSU, but seing how the voltage is fine doesn't seem to indicate any problems.

      It doesn't seem to be caused by the PSU's temperature because when it shuts down it wasn't hot at all. The fan are also running during load.

      I heard that it could also be caused by the motherboard, which mine is a Gigabyte Z-79P-D3.

      So what's the issue, is it the PSUc the motherboard or prehaps something else?

       

      Thanks,

       

      I didn't find the right solution from the internet.

      References: cnet.com/forums/discussions/possible-faulty-psumotherboard/

      Brand Advertising Video  Example

        • Re: Possible faulty PSU/Motherboard?
          black_zion

          What does ADIA64 say your voltages are, namely your +12v voltage? Anything under 11.9 and you start running into problems.

           

           

          You can also open the stability test and the Statistics tab will keep track of the voltage readings as you go about using your computer normally.

           

          1 of 1 people found this helpful