25 Replies Latest reply on Sep 3, 2017 1:34 AM by rebelyell

    This is just my luck, I guess...

    andrei93

        I know not many of you will give a damn and that there will probably also be the occasional trolls, but here's my story.

        For more than a decade now I have been gaming on a fairly low-end PC consisting of an AMD Athlon II X2 and a Radeon 6770 and I've always wanted one of those dream PCs that I saw being built by various youtube channels such as Paul's Hardware, Linus Tech tips and so on. Now, an opportunity showed up for me to get out of my country and move to England in order to work and so I did. In 6 months time I've managed to save up over 2000£ and I bought all the parts you'll see in this picture:
      IMG_20170728_222510.jpg

        I apologize for the poor image quality since I took it with my phone and for the clothes in the background since I was too eager to take the picture and show it to a buddy of mine.

      Here are the specs: https://www.scan.co.uk/savedbasket/b4d65dfb-9fe0-4bdc-bc4f-250ae48e5123
      And the ram kit is a 16GB G.Skill FlareX 3200Mhz CL14 and it was bought from Amazon since scan.co.uk only has Corsair memory.

        The only thing those pieces needed was the RX Vega liquid cooled and I could finally start building my dream PC. Only one problem. Today I saw the first unboxing vide of the liquid cooled RX Vega done by AdoredTV and my heart sank. I bought that 850W PSU thinking that it should be more than enough since even the high end GPUs these days are fine with only a good quality 600W psu. But when I saw that minimum 1000W PSU requirement on the box I was bummed.

        Now, I don't know what to do. Either I'll buy a new 1000W PSU and wait a few more months to buy the RX Vega liquid cooled (by that time the price will probably be well inflated due to miners), or buy an already overpriced RX 580 so I can at least build my system and also take advantage of the screen's FreeSync capability.

        • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
          black_zion

          It's not that bad. Vega64 has a TDP of 375w and your CPU 65w. Overestimation for full load stress with overclocking of 400w and 100w, that's 500w, the rest of your system is well under 250w, so you're easily over 100w to the good. Corsair uses quality OEMs for their units, so that 70 amp rating is genuine. 88% is not the most efficient load level, but you're good for at least 5 years. Starting with Navi next year the process node drops to 7nm which should cut power draw again. Vega64 and the GTX 1080Ti both push 14nm to their limits.

          1 of 1 people found this helpful
          • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
            rebelyell

            black zion is on key but lets not forget the 145 max watt on cpu if overclocked on all or any ryzen.. i just need to pu that out but a same time your in good shape.... next time aim for 60 % max psu under hard load for long life. as for now u you look fine no worries

            • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
              qwixt

              I think you will fine with that PSU and watercooled Vega64.

               

              Edit: Now I am not sure. I saw one review say < 400 watts, and another with 460 watts. IT kind of depends on the rest of your system and CPU. If you go 1080, it has much lower power requirements.

                • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
                  black_zion

                  PCWorld's review, using the very power hungry Intel i7-5960X (140w TDP), and lacking maybe 50w in fans and other accessories a typical enthusiast PC would have, such as a dedicated WiFi card, a power draw AT THE WALL, which, taking efficiency into account, equates to a draw under 350w on the PSU. Even if you were to almost double that a 750w PSU would have no problems

                   

                   

                   

                  AMD Radeon RX Vega review: Vega 56, Vega 64, and liquid-cooled Vega 64

                   

                  Power

                  We test power under load by plugging the entire system into a Watts Up meter, running the intensive Division benchmark at 4K resolution, and noting the peak power draw. Idle power is measured after sitting on the Windows desktop for three minutes with no extra programs or processes running.

                   

                  power draw

                   

                  Our test system

                  We tested the Radeon RX Vega 64 on PCWorld’s dedicated graphics card benchmark system. Our testbed’s loaded with high-end components to avoid bottlenecks in other parts of the system and show unfettered graphics performance. Some secondary details differ from prior reviews, however, as we’re in the process of upgrading to a more modern testing system. The case, power supply, and SSD model have changed, but the core aspects remain the same as before, and we retested all of the cards

                  • Intel’s Core i7-5960X with a Corsair Hydro Series H100i closed-loop water cooler ($110 on Amazon)
                  • An Asus X99 Deluxe motherboard
                  • 16GB of Corsair’s Vengeance LPX DDR4 memory ($148 on Amazon)
                  • EVGA Supernova 1000 G3 power supply ($200 on Amazon)
                  • A 500GB Samsung 850 EVO SSD ($175 on Amazon)
                  • Corsair Crystal Series 570X case, deemed Full Nerd’s favorite case of 2016 ($180 on Amazon)
                  • Windows 10 Pro ($180 on Amazon)
                  1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
                  andrei93

                  Untitled.jpg

                   

                  Vega is on it's way, guys! The beast will soon have it's beating heart

                    • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
                      black_zion

                      See if you can corroborate TomsHardware's results. They put a liquid cooler on a Vega 64 and were met by horrendous results. You can't really justify overclocking it unless you want to make your power company happy.

                       

                      AMD RX Vega 64: The Tom's Hardware Liquid Cooled Edition

                      Doom’s meager 12% performance boost (in exchange for an 18% frequency increase) doesn't represent great scaling. The same can be said for The Witcher 3’s 7%-higher performance that’s achieved by increasing the clock rate by 11%. Allow it to sink in that you pay for those 7% with a 44% (or 120W) power consumption increase, and you'll realize how ludicrous the situation is.

                       

                      It’s certainly possible to overclock the Radeon RX Vega 64, but doing so doesn't make much sense. Games that didn’t run well before aren’t going to suddenly become (more) playable after overclocking the card.

                    • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
                      andrei93

                      Got a pretty sad email yesterday.
                      i72^cimgpsh_orig.jpg

                       

                      Oh well...

                      • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
                        andrei93

                          Ladies and gentlemen, the beating heart of the beast has arrived!

                         

                        ^D8E3837A87798D2069024B8F5398B60E251BA212D1C728ACB3^pimgpsh_fullsize_distr.jpgUntitled.jpg

                         

                          Now it's time to have some fun. Does anyone know a good overclocking guide for R7 CPUs on a Hero VI motherboard?  As of yet, I've only checked out the one from Asus North America youtube channel and either I'm not doing something right or I shouldn't have updated the bios to the latest version because following that guide, I can only get my RAM to their rated speeds. Overclocking the CPU results in a blackscreen.
                          I have to say that I don't really understand how tweaking the CPU voltage in this new UEFI bios works. It's my first time playing with one of these new kinds of bios. I know that manual voltage sets the voltage to a certain number like 1.375v but it keeps it there regardless. I would like to use offset mode but that's the one I don't understand. My bios currently reads my CPU voltage somewhere around 1.100v and I don't know how to up it in order to add the offset (if that's how it works).

                          • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
                            whiskey-foxtrot

                            Before you start messing with offsets, try the simple OC methods first; from within the BIOS select one of the presets. As you learn more about what it all means, you can start fine tuning to your hearts content! The Crosshair boards are known for "enthusiast level" options, so there's a LOT you can do with it. No one should give you specific voltages and offsets (with exception of limits) and NEVER blindly use numbers you see on the 'net; for instance, you don't want to push your vCore voltage close to or over 1.5V. As for offsets, you'd use those to prevent "vdroop" for instance during system boot or times when peak performance is required. Offsets allow the system to provide enough "V" to do what is asked of it. So keep things simple, use presets and learn what all the options mean. Over clocking takes time to tune; as long as you stay within safe-limits, experiment in small steps and only make one change at a time.

                             

                            Check out the overclockers.net forums, specifically in their ROG section, and also browse the asus ROG forums as well.

                             

                            You can also play with Ryzen Master from within Windows if you're more comfortable with that.

                          • Re: This is just my luck, I guess...
                            rebelyell

                            setting offsets is kinda old school with too much jump in voltage in my opinion. but what works for one may not for another. as an asus hair user i would never use old school offsets, its better to use load line smooth vrm transitions imo. it really depends if you want bench marks or real work loads. there is so many variables on how to oc or setup its either 1 way way or the other dont mix how you setup the bios on top shelf boards as it can get confused. pick 1 of the 5 ways and do it. mmmmkk