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Suspecting My rx 460 as the root cause of a problem in game

Question asked by passante on Aug 8, 2017
Latest reply on Sep 1, 2017 by ray_m

System

Mobo: GA-B250M-D3H (Bios Ver. F7)

PSU: EVGA 500b Bronze

CPU: Core i3-6100

GPU: Radeon RX 460

SSD: Samsung Evo 850 250gb

RAM: HyperX Fury DDR4 8gb @ 2133MHz

OS: Windows 7 64bit Home Premium

 

Hi to all members.

I'm dealing with a subtle yet extremely annoying problem that is literally driving me crazy. Basically, what happens in fps games is the following...

When I shoot, even If hold my mouse firm without moving it, my crosshair would move frenetically left to right just that tiny bit necessary to put my crosshair off target. It just goes a little bit out of range in a time frame of 200ms let's say. Like, left-right, left-right, left-right. In the beginning I obviously thought it could be a mouse problem, so I tried different mouse but the result didn't change. To be completely sure I assigned the fire button to a keyboard key and the result was the same. Now, this gets much worse If I shoot while moving or make abrupt, fast swings and movements while shooting. If I shoot while walking my bullets would fly all over the place, is not even funny. I got a feeling as if my movement in the game is somehow disconneted from the actual game. Like as if something is out of sync. The game runs very fast. So I'm not talkiing about some kind of a lag...it's different. The movement is fast, but is in a way choppy. As if it were skipping some frames.

Before suspecting my GPU I actually thought it could be my SSD cause the Samsung Evo has been reported for stuttering problems with games, but I installed the game on a different hard drive and again the problem persisted. At this point it could be the GPU, my Mobo or some Bios setting.

The game I'm talking about btw is Cs 1.6, an old FPS game wich has minimal requirements to be run.

I really hope it isn't my GPU cause this was my first AMD video card. I've been always with the green team the last 15 years.

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