5 Replies Latest reply on Aug 3, 2017 7:41 AM by atlasminor

    Has Crossfire come to an end?

    chrisredfieldjr

      AMD Distancing from CrossFire with RX Vega | GamersNexus - Gaming PC Builds & Hardware Benchmarks

       

      Can I finally give up using crossfire? I currently have a RX 580 with a RX 480 in crossfire but the tech support has been degrading every year more and more, although some games in DX12 prove that it is a perfectly functional and viable technology.
      The amd should make an official statement just like Nvidia did.

        • Re: Has Crossfire come to an end?
          black_zion

          Crossfire and SLI yes. It's really a combination of the APIs requiring the game developers to do all of the multiple GPU coding (vs AMD and nVidia taking the brunt of the work), the fact that consoles do not have multiple GPUs therefore ports require additional work for multiple GPUs, the cost of two midrange graphics cards approaching or exceeding the cost of a high end graphics card yet yielding lower performance, and the advent of adaptive sync technologies (FreeSync and G-Sync) meaning insane frame rates are no longer necessary to maintain smoothness.

           

          But above all of those, the "resolution race" is over. UHD is as high as monitors can get without getting migraine inducing as far as gaming goes, and some UHD displays at 28 inches make for an unpleasant experience. 8K and 16K displays are professional displays, and will for a long time be out of the range of gamers, plus the size of them makes them impractical.

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          • Re: Has Crossfire come to an end?
            bearcat22

            Yea, sell your second card if your a gamer. If your into bench-marking you still might find some use for crossfire in synthetic benchmarks that support it.

            • Re: Has Crossfire come to an end?
              chrisredfieldjr

              When I see games so well optimized for multi gpu, I think it's unfortunate that maybe the destination is that one. Although many AAA games do not give the importance and support of multi-gpu, we still have many games that go the other way and deliver a near perfect support to crossfire. I have here Sniper Elite 3, Rise of Tomb Raider, Deus Ex Mankind Divided, who use the features of DX12 to take advantage of their crossfire (multi-gpu). Even games in DX11 often deliver great crossfire performance such as Prey, Mad Max and GTAV. So I can not believe it's something so unfeasible so it can not attract more audiences. Several friends of mine have been interested at some point in crossfire / sli, but in the last months have chosen not to do so. The interest of the public exists, what is missing for the devs to give what the public wants? AMD has been encouraging anyone to use and multi-gpu, creating tools to improve it, helping the DX12 in this matter whenever possible by improving the drivers. I find it sad that something so cool can come to an end.

                • Re: Has Crossfire come to an end?
                  black_zion

                  The main problem, especially with Crossfire, is how often it is abused. AMD allowed Crossfire across the entire range of cards, which meant you had some people get talked into the monumentally horrible decision for Hybrid CrossfireX, which gave worse performance with an APU+GPU combo vs just a single GPU costing $15 more than the Hybrid CrossfireX capable GPU. They also allowed Crossfire with lower end cards which meant you had people using, say, dual R7 260X or R9 270X because they could, even though they were always going to be hampered by a 128 or 256 bit memory bus. Even worse was when you step back towards the HD 7000 series and earlier where you had GDDR3 on retail midrange cards.

                   

                  I for one am glad it's dying, and it can't die soon enough.

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                • Re: Has Crossfire come to an end?
                  atlasminor

                  I have heard and seen then have read for myself both decisions, its like a teeter-totter of technology , than Bam.

                   

                  News released examples of soon to be released SLI / Crossfire cards along with a replacement tech named Fully Integrated APU tech with onboard GPU's.... apparently there is a advantage to integrated GPU's that supersedes both API's.

                   

                  Personally, I would prefer Integrated, though not a big (GMA) fan, just because intel locks there chips to lower than standard performance, but I predicted back in 2005 Integrated would be the next step. The idea was mocked in both worlds

                   

                  but I was right. I just looked at the super gaming console sitting on the shelf, and said there it is, we strive to get seamless FPS , tear free gaming / video putput, only to be shown up by a tiny plastic box that cost pennies compared to a nice budget rig.

                   

                  The pixel collider ( now in new 2017 Raider's of the Lost Ark see through case ) Behold! The Large Pixel Collider is the most powerful PC we've ever built | PC Gamer

                   

                  but no one has a budget even remotely close to say that, that's mass producible

                   

                  So integrated is the way to go, and soon will be full body VR suits, should make sense one day.