3 Replies Latest reply on Mar 23, 2017 3:21 PM by black_zion

    Why would AMD release a new CPU and three months later a new video card?

    jangis

      Makes no sense, anyone who builds a new system with Ryzen will likely want a new video card also, but wait, the new Vega card will not be released for 2 or 3 months. Well too late for me I had to buy an Nvidia card. Seems logical they would want to do both at the same time

        • Re: Why would AMD release a new CPU and three months later a new video card?
          black_zion

          Why delay a product which is ready for 3 months? Plus a video card is easy to change.

            • Re: Why would AMD release a new CPU and three months later a new video card?
              jangis

              Yes video cards are easy to change, however I assume anyone who upgrading or built a new system based off the latest Ryzen chips will also want to upgrade their video cards. While Vega is the card many of us want, it is not available, so we have a choice, stick with our old outdated card, wait 3 months to use our new computers until the Vega card comes out, or do what I did, but the best available card now and just skip the Vega card for a few years. Which means now AMD lost out on my money for Vega,  I am not spending $500 on a card now and another $500 when Vega comes out. Thats like sony selling a new updated PS5, but then saying the new controllers won't be ready for another 4 months. The old controllers will work but only provide half the functionality as the new controllers. Just a bad idea in my book

                • Re: Why would AMD release a new CPU and three months later a new video card?
                  black_zion

                  Not exactly right. You are assuming EVERYONE who upgrades their CPU will also upgrade their GPU, and that's a very unreasonable assumption. Some people will want to do that yes, but the most popular gaming resolutions are from 1920x1080 to 2560x1600, all of which are easily doable by existing video cards, such as the RX 480, R9 290X/390X, Fury/Nano/X, and GTX 1060/70/80, and you will not have to wait months for optimizations from both AMD and the game developers. Vega will bring the power for single card UHD and power efficiency, but no technological upgrades, and no new API support, so there is literally zero reason for any gamer to have to have Vega.

                   

                  Also you are assuming that EVERYONE has $1500 to drop at the same time for a complete system upgrade, whereas most will buy the CPU, RAM, and motherboard now, which is $900-$1000 alone, then upgrade their video card a few months later after they accumulate funds. You are also assuming EVERYONE wants to buy new things as soon as they hit the shelves, when the reality is the majority wait for the "new release tax" to wear off and see how the competition responds, which usually takes 3-4 months.

                   

                  Finally the mainstream R5 processors, as opposed to the enthusiast R7, will launch alongside Vega, at a much more wallet friendly price, and these will have the same gaming power as the R7 series, which will leave more funds available for the GPU upgrade for those people who will do everything at the same time.

                   

                  Of course remember that to use Ryzen or Kaby Lake, you must be using Windows 10 due to Microsoft's recent decision to ban all users of post Skylake processors from using Windows Update (or Linux Kernel 6, which the major distros have updated to), which means the market is effectively constrained to 25.19% of Windows computers, meaning millions of computers will continue to use AMD Excavator and Intel Skylake processors for the near future.