2 Replies Latest reply on Oct 7, 2016 2:36 PM by atlasminor
      • Re: Does the r5 m330 graphic shared/integrated in APU A8 7410 is the same as dedicated R5 m330 in other laptop?
        amdmatt

        The A8-7410 APU features an R5 graphics processor. It is not as powerful as the R5 M330 discrete GPU. You can find some benchmarks below.

        AMD A-Series A8-7410 Notebook SoC - NotebookCheck.net Tech

        1 of 1 people found this helpful
        • Re: Does the r5 m330 graphic shared/integrated in APU A8 7410 is the same as dedicated R5 m330 in other laptop?
          atlasminor

          If your looking for a development mobile laptop through AMD unfortunately manufactures didn't produce a proper mobile version for something as powerful as newer AutoCAD / entry level game development. Although you probably wont be working on anything close to *CRISIS type programming  your going to want to find something with a dedicated GPU.

           

          Lenovo recently released a APU-R7 + R9 Dedicated that has a ( Real ) GPU card in them , from what is known about them , Y900 I think, but no, current mobile setups left APU's less efficient then they should have.

           

          Your R5 would easy out-power a R5 Dedicated if it was allowed to max clock memory on test with a R5 at baseline testing. That would however be cheating since your upgrading the APU and not modifying the GPU, but together they scale.

           

          Get a APU mobile that will start at 2133.33 and a unit/model that will later if not at purchase of laptop Upgrade to or past 3200+ and shot for a timing CL of 11 or lower.

           

          The power of APU's isn't fully understood most the time, and when you see advertised Dedicated, might not really be dedicated as in stand-alone GPU. Ask to see the card inside your next purchase. Don't get this confused, the soldered on integrated dedicated GPU's are dedicated and fully functional, but the stand alone version such as found in the Y900 are still more powerful.

           

          SO .... when you ask R5 vs R5 without a model/ make of the device referring to, no way of knowing exact answer. A mR5 dedicated standalone vs a R5 integrated Vs a APU-R5 shared , is the problem you were facing until reading this post.

           

          Glad to help, The soldered on version awill be aimed at Low-Power setups, vs something like the newer Y900 is High-Performance.

           

          It is what it is, no real difference , just manufactures didn't include proper cooling or upgrade capability on the Low-Power-Models vs a High Performance laptop meant for development.

           

          In a high performance test the mR5-GPU wins. In the current place you find actual m5GPU+ R5 APU, the APU wins because of limited bandwidth. basically they rate about the same, 2Ghz give or take, mostly runs on the APU and the Dedicated really isn't configured to game. It helps some 3D apps but without the proper setup for them, they wont see college development class's. World need to handle the new Windows-10 Metro / Linux environment, that's what the lower power is mostly for.

           

          Was this more info then you needed? Never, when you realize you cant upgrade a Soldered on lower RAM stick after purchase with no return you will thank me, and know why manufactures LOCKED the boards in such a way.

           

          Have great weekend guys.

           

          edit for though

          The reality is the APU wins in every model on the market today when in the low-power configuration, it will switch to the Dedicated-Integrated but the heat kills the performance of it. Every laptop on the market today for the low-power APUshared+Dedicated-intergrated  included only one fan, and it over the APU which only helps running 3d apps putting all stress and heat on the integrated giving less performance than the APU running alone. The integrated version on current market are worse than the APU's inside them for this reason.

           

          The heat index will surpass 80c on the intergrated/dedicated , your keyboard will get hot and performance will drop like a rock to a serious level to turning off the laptop. If you don't mind burnt fingers while programming, go for it. There should have been al aw preventing such a horrible experience, but there isn't, those laptops will perform as tested, but apps like CAD huge resources hogs  may leave you with a dead laptop.

           

          This fact probably wont change, there are High Performance models for sell alongside them.