4 Replies Latest reply on Apr 13, 2016 5:35 AM by savagebeastzero

    How do I know which amd card to buy and how do I know it will fit into my laptop???

    tikal
        • Re: How do I know which amd card to buy and how do I know it will fit into my laptop???
          1542

          you can't put a graphic cards in a laptop, they use integrated graphics

            • Re: How do I know which amd card to buy and how do I know it will fit into my laptop???
              lantzk

              Not entirely accurate -- you can replace the discrete graphics in some laptops. That said, it's tricky and your options are far more limited than they would be if you were upgrading a desktop. OP has not provided nearly enough information to know whether or not they might be able to do so, however.

              • Re: How do I know which amd card to buy and how do I know it will fit into my laptop???
                savagebeastzero

                lantzk is absolutely correct. There are a few factors that determine whether or not a laptop is user serviceable and in fact upgradable. Whether or not the APU is soldered to the socket is ultimately the deal breaker of course. Yet, there are other factors as well including but, not limited to manufacturer lock out via bios, incompatible internal configurations and those are just to name a few.

                 

                If in fact a manufacturer hasn't designed the laptop with any of the above "features" and there is an "upgrade path", the end user must then determine what graphics solution from within the same family or series best suits their configuration.

                 

                A good example of a manufacturer that tends to leave their laptop designs open to the end user is HP. This isn't however due to them thinking of the end users benefit, it's simply cheaper to manufacture them in such as manner with "off the shelf" components, while utilizing the same basic configuration overall such as identical motherboards across the different tiers. They save on production and are only at risk of a small fraction of users performing such an upgrade. The loss is extremely small overall in their eyes.

                 

                Example: HP laptops containing the 7600G series released a few years back were simply different variations distinguished solely by the APU and memory size. Thus the end user, if knowledgeable enough to disassemble the unit could then purchase the lowest tier model 4GB model and replace it's lower end APU with a 7660G (highest tier).

                 

                The end user could then purchase an extra 4GB memory module, to then complete the upgrade process and possess the highest tier model for a fraction of the cost. At the time of release, the lowest tier model was roughly $350 and the highest tier was $875. Yet the 7660G could be found via third party vendors for $65 and the memory module for $35. Thus the end user only paid a total of $450 for the highest model.

                 

                Manufacturers have since begun a shift towards closing configurations out, but for many mass production manufacturers, it's still simply more expensive to do so and they remain open for those willing to delve into attempting an upgrade.