5 Replies Latest reply on Dec 18, 2015 3:59 PM by ebonclaw

    I just wanna play Fallout 4 :'(

    commandershepard

      Currently have a VAIO E Series laptop with an i7-3632QM CPU, 8GB DDR3 RAM, and integrated Intel HD 4000 Graphics and was hyped for Fallout 4. The little VAIO that could (almost) had enough RAM and a competent CPU, but the integrated graphics was the breaking point. However, I refused to give up. I edited the game to run in DirectX 11 rather than DX12, tweaked the .ini until the game was sure to look like something from the early 2000s and even went into the computer registry to prevent the Intel HD driver from crashing. At this point I didn't care about my PCs longevity, I HAD TO PLAY FALLOUT! After all the tweaking (both the .ini and from Fallout withdrawal) I eventually got the game to run past the face creator, at a blazing 17FPS. Combat was impossible without VATS and running in buildings was not an option unless I wanted to run into walls endlessly. But quality didn't matter, I was getting my fix. And then the Corvega Plant happened. 4FPS. I quit cold turkey.

       

      But the wilderness kept plaguing me. There had to be something I could do. I began looking at controversial, inhumane, unnatural means to run the game: eGPUs. This Frankenstein's Monster of PC gaming may be the way to go. But I wasn't willing to sacrifice my laptop's portability, and this mutated monstrosity of a means did not justify the end.

       

      So instead I decided to build a rig. Although Fallout 4 is Nvidia optimized, I was on a budget and decided on AMD products. After doing my research, I found that the Red Team had won me over. So to spite Nvidia's attempted monopoly on AAA titles, I vowed to go Red all the way. Poor optimization and Gimpworks would not stop the beating heart of the Red Team.

       

      I haven't accumulated all my parts yet, but here is what It's gonna be:

      CPU: AMD FX-8320 3.5GHz 8-Core Processor

      CPU Cooler: Deepcool CAPTAIN 240 91.1 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler

      Motherboard: ASRock 990FX Killer ATX AM3+ Motherboard

      Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws X Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR3-1866 Memory

      Storage: PNY CS1211 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive

      Video Card: PowerColor Radeon R9 390 8GB PCS+ Video Card

      Case: Deepcool KENDOMEN Red ATX Mid Tower Case

      Power Supply: Thermaltake 750W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply

      Total: <$700 with rebates, combos, etc.

      Keep in mind I was on a tight budget, but I think I got a pretty good bang for my buck.

      AMD is GOAT ("god of all things ", not to be confused with the G.O.A.T. "generalized occupational aptitude test") and I'm now Red Team Or Die.

       

      EDIT: Here are the pics (pardon the potato)

      IMAG0328.jpgThe components (minus the GPU, I was way too eager to get started building to wait for it)

      IMAG0332.jpg

       

       

       

      My attempt at cable management. The flat wires of the PSU were a hassle, as bending them to route them was impossible since they were like a ribbon of cables rather than a bundle (if that makes sense)

      IMAG0334.jpgFast-forward to the Windows boot (was too into it to take intermediate pics)

      IMAG0359_1.jpg

       

       

       

                                                                                        Wanted to do a push/pull on the 240 rad, but there was no space with the heatsink

       

       

      IMAG0360_1.jpgThe fan hub was a nice addition, and allowed me to put the rad fans on one controller

      IMAG0358.jpg

       

       

       

       

                                                                                                                                                                                  The fans on the Captain 240

       

       

       

       

      IMAG0353.jpgThe aesthetics of the cooler

      IMAG0352.jpg

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

                                                                                                                                                                                             The belly of the beast

       

       

      IMAG0345.jpgThe setup. Yep, I'm using an old 4:3 monitor from the early 2000s and an equally antiquated rubber-dome keyboard. My next steps are a mechanical keyboard, and ultrawide monitor (oh and more storage).

      Yep, I get it's weird that the post title is "I just wanna play Fallout 4 " and this is a Mass Effect theme, but I love them both so ¯\_(ツ)_/¯.

        • Re: I just wanna play Fallout 4 :'(
          ebonclaw

          Dude, find 50 bucks more in your wallet and get an SSD, even if it's just a 120gb to put your OS and Fallout on.  It makes a huge world of difference in load/boot times.  Also, split your RAM into two 4GB modules to enable dual channel access.  If you're not going to go crazy with overclocking, the Coolermaster 212 Evo cooler will do an outstanding job of keeping your temps down and your wallet more full; I really love the benefits of a good air cooler.

          Lastly, RGB LED strips make it run faster.  Promise.

          Plz post pics when assembled.

            • Re: I just wanna play Fallout 4 :'(
              commandershepard

              Yeah I'm definitely planning on getting an SSD at some point. Should I get it before first boot so I don't have to transfer the OS later or can it wait if the OS transfer isn't too tedious? Don't worry about the cooler, I got a really good deal on it. I'm thinking about buying another 8GB module later for dual channel, is that a good idea because I am planning on having this build be upgrade ready and I don't want to fill it up with low RAM modules? And as for the RGB LED strips, that incorporates the photoelectric effect where the light can cause a current of electrons to escape the components making faster wireless connections to the mobo/PSU, amirite? I guess I just have to find the threshold frequency to get a good current going.

                • Re: I just wanna play Fallout 4 :'(
                  ebonclaw

                  Reinstalling an OS and all your programs is of course somewhat tedious, if you're planning on getting an SSD, I'd just go ahead and do it straight away and not have to mess with the hassle of trying to figure out what needs to be reinstalled where.  The OS and games with a ton of loadscreens (FFXIV, Skyrim, etc), as well as routinely launched applications will be what you want on the SSD.  Load times will be MUCH faster.  Other games that load once and then are "done" like Battlefield 4 for example, are fine residing on the higher capacity HDD.  I set up Steam to have two install directories, defaulting to the HDD, but I'll switch to the SSD if I feel the game warrants it.


                  As far as RAM goes, it is highly unlikely you'll ever need 16GB of RAM, 8GB is plenty, and even if you're running 8GB (as 2 4GB DIMMS) you'll still have two leftover slots if you ever wanted to go to 16, but again, it's highly unlikely you'll actually use that much for gaming purposes.  If you do extensive video editing, heavy photoshop/CAD work or something, that's a different story of course, but for a gaming PC, you'll be replacing the PC before you'll find yourself needing more than (or even a total of) 16GB.  You will get better performance from running 2 4GB sticks in dual channel than a single 8.  Note how the RAM slots on your MoBo are alternate colors; this is to indicate which slots need to be filled in order to achieve dual channel rates (EG both black slots or both red slots, refer to MoBo manual for which should be filled first). 

                    • Re: I just wanna play Fallout 4 :'(
                      commandershepard

                      Alright, thanks for the help. I'll post pics when I get I get it done.

                        • Re: I just wanna play Fallout 4 :'(
                          ebonclaw

                          No problem man.  BTW, while I make do with my 120GB SSD, I have to make a conscious effort to be aware of what I'm installing to it and keep it cleaned off pretty routinely, I wish I'd bought a bigger one off the bat.  My wife has a 240 and doesn't have to think nearly as hard about installing or downloading whatever to it.  A 120 is better than nothing, especially if you have good disk management practices, but otherwise, you may want to seriously consider buying a 240, even if it means waiting on buying a 1TB drive later.  Tis the season for these kinds of things to be on sale though, so keep an eye out and you may score a good deal on one.