3 Replies Latest reply on Apr 2, 2009 6:55 AM by dele123

    "Security Processing Unit" (SPU)?

    gwest39

      I was wondering if it would be possible for AMD to make something like a "Security Processing Unit (SPU)," or some other name, similar to what a GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) does in moving a lot of the graphics processing (or in this case security processing) away from the main processor. It could even have its own RAM memory much like a GPU video card does. An "SPU" card could be placed in a standard PCI slot and you could choose any security software you want that can work with the chipset. It could also maybe have SATA pass-through connectors on the card where all hard drive activity could be scanned in real time on the "SPU" without slowing down the main processor or hard drive access times by just listening in to the data being transfered and notifing the operating system if something is detected. It always seemed a bit much to scan every file on the hard drive everyday with a scheduled scan. The files can't do any harm until they are loaded off the hard drive into memory anyway, so it would make more sense to just scan files when they are read or written and the "SPU" wouldn't slow your computer down any.

        • "Security Processing Unit" (SPU)?
          avk

          I think that 99.999% of PC users have no need in this kind of device, at least in PCI/PCIE-card form. As you know, many contemporary consumer CPUs consist of several cores, from 2 to 4, and their quantity will just grow (6, 8, 12 and so on). How do you think, is every CPU core working all the time? In almost all cases - no. So, I think, security software can work on one of those cores, leaving the others to other programs.

          • "Security Processing Unit" (SPU)?
            godsic

            I think you need to buy MB with 4 PCIex16 slots, and insert some middle-end GPU in one of the slave slots, after you can write you own program which protect you PC (or try to find something open source and modify) using ATI Stream (or OpenCL in near future)!