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Hindemith
Adept I

Can an old water cooler keep up with 5700X3D?

Hey all,

 

I have finally upgraded from a R7 2700 to a newer processor, being the 5700X3D. I have made the switch yesterday, and since the first boot, the CPU is overheating very fast even when idle (or in BIOS).

Relevant system info:

PSU: Seasonic Focus GX 1000W

MB: Asus TUF B450M Plus Gaming

Cooler: Cooler Master Seidon 120V (not sure which version, but it's a single fan one)

Thermal paste: Thermal Grizzly Kryonaut

 

2700 was running stock (used to be overclocked fine as well with same cooler), peaking at around 65°C, idling at around 35-40°C.

 

I know the power difference from the 2700 to the 5700X3D is big (65W vs 105W), so my running hypothesis is that the old water cooler is worn out, but was still enough to cool the low power 2700, but can't keep up with the 5700X3D. Is this plausible? 

I want to reinstall the 2700 to check, but I am waiting for more Thermal paste to arrive.

 

Thank you in advance

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5 Replies
FunkZ
Exemplar

How old is the AIO? Has the coolant been refreshed? Has the cold plate been removed to check for blockages/contamination?

Typically single fan (120/140) AIO coolers are outperformed by high end air coolers. If you have the room you could pick up something like the Thermalright Peerless Assassin.

Or you could enter this month's contest for the be Quiet 240 AIO.

https://community.amd.com/t5/contests-and-sweeps/red-team-monthly-sweepstakes-july-be-quiet-pure-loo...

Ryzen R7 5700X | B550 Gaming X | 2x16GB G.Skill 3600 | Radeon RX 7900XT

For some reason my reply disappeared.

 

Sorry, I forgot to mention. The cooler is quite old (8+ years) and I never did any maintenance on it. I am inclined to think it's the cooler. The only thing I can't fit into this theory is why was it holding the 2700 under load, but the 5700X3D overheats in seconds.

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As you pointed out, the R7 2700 is a 65W TDP processor that came boxed with a Wraith Spire cooler, essentially just a block of aluminum with a fan. That same bare minimum level of cooling isn't going to cut it on a 105W TDP chip like the 5700X3D.

You could try refreshing your Seidon, but assuming the pump is still in good working order and there's no blockages it's not going to improve temps much just changing the coolant.

Ryzen R7 5700X | B550 Gaming X | 2x16GB G.Skill 3600 | Radeon RX 7900XT
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You have a very old Cooler Master AIO that is not even listed under the current Cooler Master TDP Chart for CPU Coolers.

 

But found this old review (https://hardwaresecrets.com/cooler-master-seidon-120xl-cpu-cooler-review/) that mentions the 120mm AIO Cooler Master has a TDP rating of 95  watts. Your new AMD Ryzen 7 58003D has a TDP rating of 105 Watts.

 

There is also a 240mm model but you will need to find out what size Radiator your AIO is using. Most likely it is the 120MM one. just guessing though.

 

From what I read both models uses 2  fans and not one. So most likely you are missing one fan from your AIO.

 

Your AIO is very underpowered for your new AMD processor. New will need a CPU Cooler with at least a TDP rating of 150 watts or higher to prevent your processor from overheating.

 

By the way your old Cooler Master AIO should come with 2 fans and not one. If one is missing that is another reason why your new processor is almost overheating so rapidly.

Thank you for your reply. IIRC there was one version (the one I'm using) that came with just one fan. But everyone I asked seems to believe the same as me: even if the cooler was new, which it definitely isn't, it might've had trouble keeping up with the 5700X3D. I think it's time for a replacement.