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JoltCola
Adept III
Adept III

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.

It isn't just cheap cooling. I have a NH-D15, the best air cooler money can buy, and pretty good case airflow and my 5950X easily hits 90C under full load with PBO set to motherboard. That's what PBO does, it unleashes all the power settings so the chip drinks power until it hits the max temp limit, which is 90C by default. You can drop the temp limit in PBO also if 90C makes you nervous.

Shaterhand
Adept I
Adept I

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.


@JoltCola wrote:

It isn't just cheap cooling. I have a NH-D15, the best air cooler money can buy, and pretty good case airflow and my 5950X easily hits 90C under full load with PBO set to motherboard. That's what PBO does, it unleashes all the power settings so the chip drinks power until it hits the max temp limit, which is 90C by default. You can drop the temp limit in PBO also if 90C makes you nervous.


Can you explain a bit more about PBO? I've heard about it, but I don't really know what PBO is and how should I set it up according to what you said.

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JoltCola
Adept III
Adept III

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.

Yes, PBO lets you unlock the power usage on your chip. By default for example my 5950X is 142W PPT, 95A TDC, 140A EDC. In PBO you can manually set those numbers or set it to "motherboard", which essentially sets them to extremely high values set by your motherboard manufacturer, which knows the max your VRMs can actually handle.

If you look in Ryzen Master while running a benchmark you can see those values in the dials at the top. Either one of them will be at 100% or you'll hit 90C, and that's what's capping your performance.

So basically, set PBO to motherboard and you'll see much faster scores but generate a ton more heat until you either hit 90C (the default cap, which can also be changed in PBO) or your chip does the best it can, if you have very high-end water cooling.

Shaterhand
Adept I
Adept I

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.


@JoltCola wrote:

Yes, PBO lets you unlock the power usage on your chip. By default for example my 5950X is 142W PPT, 95A TDC, 140A EDC. In PBO you can manually set those numbers or set it to "motherboard", which essentially sets them to extremely high values set by your motherboard manufacturer, which knows the max your VRMs can actually handle.

If you look in Ryzen Master while running a benchmark you can see those values in the dials at the top. Either one of them will be at 100% or you'll hit 90C, and that's what's capping your performance.

So basically, set PBO to motherboard and you'll see much faster scores but generate a ton more heat until you either hit 90C (the default cap, which can also be changed in PBO) or your chip does the best it can, if you have very high-end water cooling.


Well my goal is to get lower temps, even if I sacrifice a little bit of performance, so suppose setting it to motherboard value is not what I want. If I put the PBO to disabled, then will I get lower temps? or what exactly do I need to change to it.

JoltCola
Adept III
Adept III

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.

If you want lower temps overall, you can undervolt (set vCore offset to -0.1v, for example) or use curve optimizer to more adaptively undervolt on a per-core basis. You can also turn on ECO mode, which sets the power cap to 65w, or you can do the same thing in PBO by reducing the 4 limits.

If you're concerned about temps getting too high under load, you can reduce the temp cap in PBO from 90C to say, 80C. Then it just won't boost as high or use as much voltage under load. But that won't reduce overall temps at idle or light load.

Generally speaking, you don't need to give up a lot of performance to really dramatically reduce power draw and improve temperatures. AMD drives these chips very aggressively to be competitive in the market.

mrsense
Adept II
Adept II

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.

@Shaterhand 

I've noticed negative voltage offset doesn't really bring down the maximum clock speed boost, but it does sacrifies performance (lower Cincebench scores).

The Curve Optimizer is another way to optimize the temperature and performance.  With CO, you can tune Vcore individually at minimum impact to the performance.

You first need to find which cores Ryzen Master sees as the best (green highlighted). There are usually two cores.  You can start with Negative 10 for the two cores and Negative 20 for the rest.

I noticed on one of your post you are getting 70C average during games.  I think that's perfectly fine.  Mine goes up to 80C when playing COD Cold War.

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xlox
Miniboss
Miniboss

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.

... that doesn't  change what i said ... not because you have the best cooling system in the world that you can't have a problem with it , see ?

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mrsense
Adept II
Adept II

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.

"Well my goal is to get lower temps, even if I sacrifice a little bit of performance, so suppose setting it to motherboard value is not what I want. If I put the PBO to disabled, then will I get lower temps? or what exactly do I need to change to it."

I have Gigabyte B550 Aorus Master.  Even if I turn PBO off, my 5800X still behaves as if PBO is on.  I don't know if this is my motherboard/bios related issue or 5800X issue.  When I tried it with a 5950X, I definately noticed performance and temperature differences between PBO on and off.

 

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JoltCola
Adept III
Adept III

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.

You can check if PBO is on in Ryzen Master, it will show  your PPT/TDC/EDC caps in the dials at the top of the window.

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johcamp21
Adept I
Adept I

Re: AMD Ryzen 7 5800X High temps workaround.

Have you tried leaving the cpu settings on stock in bios and limiting the processors maximum state in windows power settings to say 90 or 95%? I think this is what the first reply to this thread was trying to get you to do.

Go to system - power - change plan settings - advanced power options - maximum processor state set to 90% then adjust from there until you get the temps you want.

Bottom line is if you want the processor to keep its factory variable state frequency profile then you cant mess with the clocks. You have  to change other things. Less power means less heat.

I haven't tested this myself but in theory less power should lower the top end clock speeds while still maintaining the lower clock speeds.

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