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Processors

edsager
Adept I

AIO or new processor - got 5800X

Hello All,

I have been reading a lot about how the 5800X processor runs quite hot. I am attempting to cool it with a Cooler Master Hyper 212 Black Edition.
 
Temperatures never get below 35 degrees C (tested with Core Temp) and whenever there is any usage, the temps quickly hit 50+.
 
Returning from sleep and it gets to 60+ degrees C. Same with opening a browser.
 
I am an architecture student and need to be able to render images with software like Autodesk Revit while also using Adobe Illustrator/Photoshop. When I ran a rendering with Revit for about 8 minutes, the temp of the processor shot up to 83 degrees C.
 
TLDR: I am considering getting an AIO or other air cooler or a different processor and have a budget of about $200 ($750 if I get a new processor).
 
My questions:
 
  1. have (or how have) people been able to successfully cool the 5800X processor so that, if needed, they would feel comfortable having the processor running at full for 12 hours or more?
  2. would it be better to get a Ryzen 9 that runs cooler? If so, which one?
  3. or get a Ryzen 5?
 

Thank you for any information you can share.

My setup:

X470 (latest beta BIOS)

32GB DDR4 3200MHz

1 Solution

Thermal shutdown on these CPU's is something like 110-115 IIRC.  You're not going to run into this unless something goes wrong with your cooling system.

I torture test all my systems when I first build them.  I ran Prime95 FMA3 for 72 hours straight in a non air conditioned room in the middle of summer and the 5800X at default 90C thermal limit didn't give a single hiccup.  And this was on air cooling.

Everyone has different comfort levels.  Test your rendering workload while monitoring/logging the temperatures and if you don't feel comfortable with what you see, get better cooling and/or lower the Platform Thermal Limit. 

 

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5 Replies
ryzen_type_r
Challenger

It's a high performance CPU.  High performance CPU's get hot.

83C is not that unusual for sustained high rendering loads.  AMD has set this CPU's max operating temp to be 90C.  It will happily run at 90C all day.  These CPU's have thermal, frequency, and power limits and will run as fast as possible for a given load until it hits one or more of these limits, unlike CPU's of a few generations ago.  If you give it better cooling, you're giving it more thermal headroom to play with.  All newer CPU's are this way, including Intels.

If you don't like that 90C limit, you can easily change it in the BIOS with a setting called Platform Thermal Limit.  Just set it to whatever you feel comfortable with and the CPU will conform to the new limit.  Something like 75-80.  But don't set it to anything ridiculously low like 50 because then you're just castrating the CPU.  It would be like buying a Ferrari and not revving it past 4K rpm.

If you want to spend the money, you can get a good AiO.  If you buy a Ryzen 9, buy it for the additional cores to help your rendering, not because you think it will be running cooler.

 

@ryzen_type_r  Thank you very much for your suggestions. I will see how high the temperature will get with a longer rendering time and then decide whether to get an AIO.

Many on this forum seem to be uncomfortable with the high temperatures.

Would you feel comfortable with the longevity of this processor with sustained temperatures of 90 degrees C?

Also, would you feel comfortable leaving the computer for several hours (12+ hours) at temps above 80 degrees C? (I am concerned with the computer being shut down due to high temps after hours of rendering.)

Again, thank you for your response!

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Thermal shutdown on these CPU's is something like 110-115 IIRC.  You're not going to run into this unless something goes wrong with your cooling system.

I torture test all my systems when I first build them.  I ran Prime95 FMA3 for 72 hours straight in a non air conditioned room in the middle of summer and the 5800X at default 90C thermal limit didn't give a single hiccup.  And this was on air cooling.

Everyone has different comfort levels.  Test your rendering workload while monitoring/logging the temperatures and if you don't feel comfortable with what you see, get better cooling and/or lower the Platform Thermal Limit. 

 

I have a 5800x with a ASUS B550-F Gaming MB.  I use the Noctua NH-D15 Chromax black CPU heatsink and it does a good job taming the heat of the 5800x. I can run Prime95 small FFT's having the CPU maxed 100% and the highest I get is around 81c. I originally used my old Zalman 9900max cooler when I first got the 5800, soon as I hit start on Prime95 temps shot right to 90c. Only thing with the Noctua cooler I have is gotta have a big case.

tenzo23
Elite

I can relate. When I got my 5800X I was excited to pop it in, use the same Arctic Freezer 33 that worked great for my Ryzen 5 2600X, and call it a day. Then I saw the temps...+62C web browsing, fans ramping up to full speed constantly, and 90.4C max running C23. I thought I must've done something wrong. Then like you, I read how this is a HOT processor by design, but I wasn't comfortable leaving things as is.

First, I read about Precision Boost Overdrive and Curve Optimizer, which I never messed with before. I did a simple -20 Negative CO all cores, everything else Auto, and just with that I got about 3-5C cooler temps and higher benchmarks.

Still, I didn't want to settle and ended up getting an Arctic Liquid Freezer II 280 AIO. (I think the ALF II 240 would've been enough, but I always like to get the most out of my parts.) With that, temps dropped a good 10-12C overall!

I did a little more tinkering with PBO and CO. Used Ryzen Master to find my two fastest cores which I set to -20. The other cores I was able to set to -30 and still be stable. For PBO Limits, I set to Manual, 180 PPT, 180 TDC, and 120 EDC. Boost set to 150Mhz. All voltages still on Auto. (This is all done in BIOS.)

Now, I'm happy with the temps, noise levels, and performance I get from the 5800X. Hope this helps!

Screenshot-2022-01-05-210602.jpg

/sig Fun guy.
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