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colesdav
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

Hi,

I think Sapphire and other AMD AIB GPU's do use high quality components in general, you can see on their websites.
They all seem to discuss the quality of the capacitors and chokes used on their cards.

Manufactures and designers of any electronics product all face fierce competition on performance, features and price. It is ruthless in my experience. 
Just like the song "Everything Counts" from an old 80's band,  Depeche Mode, everything counts in large amounts.
If the difference is $5 on each unit sold is $5 extra profit per unit. That could translate to many millions or even billions depending on units sold.

I am not sure "planned failure" is really the term used, however each product designed does have an expected lifetime before obsolescence these days.
That lifetime does seem to be getting generally shorter before things fail, but electronics is much more complex with many more transistors and higher performance and power so failure rates can inherently go up. Sometimes products are obsolete if they are released just a few to 6 months late.

RE: I have fixed many Motherboards over the years replacing the capacitors but these multilayered pcbs today are getting a bit beyond what I can do at home.

Yes I agree with that. Fixing SMD components on newer PCBs is not easy. If something blows taking out a section of multilayer PCB you have very likely have to junk the entire board. I had been looking into  building my own SMD repair / reflow station so I can repair things if needed.

You might want to try joining a Makerspace Club if there is one in your area, as there are often projects running to help people work together to make a SMD Repair and Reflow Station available for members to use. That can often reduce costs and sometimes local Companies donate older equipment. Those clubs are often filled with interesting people who have a wide range of skills and long experience from different technology backgrounds, especially electronics and mechanical design and manufacture.

I have an old HP Envy 15 motherboard to practice on, the caps around the CPU socket need replacing.

Unfortunately I also have a PowerColor Fury X with a hole in the PCB where a component on the fan controller (I think) started to fail or was modified before i purchased it, so I can practice on that as well...  I tried giving it away but not taken, so, I have purchased a Sapphire Fury X. Hopefully that will work fine, and I have the PowerColor Fury X for spares now.

Bye.

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colesdav
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

Hi


You will likely be fine, however you might be unlucky and a bad component could slip through QA despite all attempts to catch them during testing.
Regarding RMA ... I have no experience with having to send any motherboard back to ASUS within the Warranty Period.
Oldest ASUS MB's I am running at present are Z87 Deluxe Dual's. They had a 3 year warranty and are still fine after ~ 4.5 years of use.  

RE: Wouldn't give a Five year Warranty on a Motherboard if they used lowest cost components that may fail within the Five year Warranty range.

Note I dropped ASUS from your statement. This comment is not about ASUS.

In general, a product could be offered with a 5 year warranty, the product could fail within that period. A Company could deliberately make the RMA process so difficult, slow, and expensive (for example you pay for return postage to another country) that people just give up and do not return a failed product. Offering RMA and RMA process will be seen as a loss making side of the business by accountants so it could be a "don't care" in reality, despite what consumers are told by product marketing before purchase.

Bye.

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pokester
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

My very quick point I was trying to make without having to write a page to explain myself was that they could use capacitors that are rated to last say 50 years of 24/7 use for not much more money than what is often used today that often seems to fail within 5 years of heavy use. Many makers are using certain better parts on their boards and they advertise those better parts on their boards packaging and websites, like the solid caps and more recently the ferrite chokes have gotten the "special attention" on boxes now too. But they still stick other junk parts on instead of the better electronics in some cases. Kind of like the old saying a chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Even those better parts often aren't even what the AIB maker thought they were. Most of that stuff on the box today is just marketing band-aids to smooth over the normal practice of sub par compared to what could have been used parts that is common practice in the world today.  I personally would rather have an extra five bucks or more tacked on the price for good parts instead and let obsolescence be dictated by when "I" choose to replace the part over hardware failure. For many years I bought boards that met military specs as they typically did use the best parts. If you can find a board that lists that, it is often using better components. This used to be very common for high end boards before everything became gaming oriented in the market, to have Mil Spec 4 components really meant something. For most people this difference probably is not needed if you are going to replace a machine in 3 to 5 years. For me I tend to have a machine in service for 10-15 years. The good thing is that at least the capacitor are much better than they were during the mid 2000's Chinese counterfeit fiasco when they were exploding after a few months usage. Which brings up another real problem in the market today. Even when a maker thinks they are using the GOOD PARTS the part they are using is often a counterfeit part that to the eye looks the same but would not meet the quality standards it should. My wife actually quality tests electronics for a defense contractor for a living and complains of this being a constant issue and has been for I'd say going on 20 years now. I really do believe that for what we pay though, and how complex the boards have become that we aren't getting ripped off or anything. It is really pretty incredible that a top notch board is only a couple hundred dollars. Heck what I payed for my first IBM XT board was 15 times that, but that machine still fires right up today too. I thinks we all just get frustrated when are part craps out on us before we stopped having use for it. Especially when it is such a cheap component on that part like a cap or resistor that forces you to have to basically buy a whole new computer or video card etc. Most of us seem to have less and less disposable income these days. The saddest thing I see happening today is the denial of warranty going on. The chipmaker, the AIB maker, the computer maker and the seller all shuffle the customer back and forth whenever there is a problem instead taking care of the issue. They do this until the customer gives up out of frustration and just ceases get what they actually are entitled to by warranty. But because so few are ever going to threaten legal action, these companies are doing this more and more. Companies will have statements in their warranty I'll pick on one by name, Cyberpower has it right in their warranty that if unless they or an authorized party, installs a part in your computer you void your warranty on the whole thing. So say you computer has 4 rams slots available and came with 2 chips, you add 2 yourself, you just voided your warranty. This is crazy and is actually illegal by the Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of 1975 but unless people challenge it in court good luck getting them to do anything different than what they say they will in their warranty as written. By law a company does not even have to offer a warranty at all, but if they choose to they cannot limit service to just the oem or oem parts. You by law have the right to use equivalent parts and put them in or use another 3rd party service to do so without breaking the warranty and can't be denied because you did this. The trick is you likely have to litigate to get them to honor this, and most wont do this. I know I am just getting old, I just remember the days when computer parts were built to last, the boxes they came in were plain cardboard with no marketing in sight and when you had an issue they gave you an RMA with few questions asked. That used to be the industry standard.

elstaci
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

RE: A Company could deliberately make the RMA process so difficult, slow, and expensive

Totally agree with that statement. I have a ACER Monitor that cost over 300.00 from Amazon.com. It has been working great since I purchased it. But unfortunately, at the top upper right corner I am seeing a white streak of failed pixels forming. I realize that eventually a whole area of the screen is going to go bad since I can see a very faint area about the size of a small yellow sticky note forming. I opened a RMA Ticket to ACER to repair/Replace it under Warranty which expires in November 2018. They said to ship the ACER Monitor to their RMA Repair center in Texas. It will cost me anywhere from 80 dollars to over 90 dollars to ship the Monitor to Texas from Florida (shipping cost plus packaging). I chatted with ACER online and mentioned that ACER has a Authorized Repair Center very close to where I live. Can I send the monitor to the ACER Authorized Repair center where I live and have them ship it to Texas or for repairs. They said No, if the Monitor should get damaged while in transit they would be responsible and ACER has a specific Repair Center for RMA which is located only in Texas.

So basically I have to live with this Monitor until it become unviewable since shipping it to Texas will cost around 30% of the Original cost of the Monitor. Never will I purchase a LARGE ITEM from Acer again. Small items I will. like Burners or Mouse etc. which will be relatively cheap to ship under warranty.

colesdav
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

Hi,

I understand your point of view.  I own and run old Vintage Personal Computers that were built in ~ 1982 and they still work fine... Also have PC's built around 1995 still running fine. They are pretty obsolete now though and it is just a hobby.

Thanks.

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colesdav
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

Talk with Amazon about it. They have been pretty good to me about one Warrranty / failed part.
They might talk with ACER on your behalf or have something to say about the postage cost.

My Sapphire HD7970 OC 6GB card failed and I contacted them to check the Warranty on the Card. The Warranty had expired, however they refunded just under 1/3 of the original cost of the card to me (~ price of standard 3GB RX280 / new lower end AMD card with similar gaming performance). They told me to  me keep the failed card,  I could sell it for parts.

Instead of just purchase another card, I purchased tools (through  Amazon) to repair the GPU and attempted to fix it myself, mostly because I know how the card has been used and it has 6GB of VRAM. I also wanted to learn about fixing GPU since I own quite a few working GPU's now. They might fail and need repair in future. I managed to repair the Sapphire HD7970 OC 6GB.

Good Luck.

Thanks.

grantelb4rt
Adept II
Adept II

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

I just wanted to update you all...

The seller was kind enough to refund me the full value of the Card (what I payed in 2016).

So I will probably switch to the dark side, since the Vega cards are still way to expensive for the Performance they offer.

At least I will be able to use my PC again without any Performance disadvantages..

elstaci
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

Seems like the seller did the right thing.  If this is normal SOP for this seller concerning Warranty returns, I would keep supporting the seller by purchasing their products in the future.

grantelb4rt
Adept II
Adept II

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

Yep, and their prices are alright too, so I plan on purchasing there again.

After all this hassle I will probably buy an EVGA card, since they have a longer guarantee and their support is said to be really good.

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pokester
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Sudden death of Sapphire R9 Fury?

Who is the seller if I may ask? Love great referrals like that. We all like to hear about folks that stand behind what they sell. So rare these days.