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black_zion
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: My $500 paperweight

From the TomsHardware review: AMD Ryzen 7 1800X: Overclocking & Test Setup

My H105 is basically of the same power as the H100i v2, and 82°C is a bit too high for my tastes, granted that's Prime95, and I haven't seen their rated thermal maximum. With a 4100mhz  XFR frequency, that's only 9% slower than my 4.6ghz FX-8350, but with a 50% IPC improvement it still should be like night and day. I wonder if I'll have to turn the fans up from 900RPM...Anyway, who knows when that will be...

dark3063
Journeyman III
Journeyman III

Re: My $500 paperweight

There is nothing made or manufactured in Taiwan?

sir you just contradicted yourself and by doing so you are misleading and confusing others

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janagewen
Challenger
Challenger

Re: My $500 paperweight

Sorry, you get me wrong, or in other words, you interpret my words wrong! I said "There is nothing made or manufactured in Taiwan, use word or phrase China instead!"

Things made in Taiwan would be labelled with "Made In Taiwan" only, there is no business with "Made In China“! But there lie some other situations, such as Taiwanese companies operate their factories in China mainland, such as annoy Foxconn Shenzhen. Things manufactured there would be labelled with "Made In China" rather than "Made In Taiwan". Taiwanese companies operate more and more factories in China mainland, such as ASUSTek, Gigabyte, ASRock and so on. Many products are manufactured in those factories too, they are labelled with "Designed in Taiwan, Made in China".

As to the AMD processors, nowadays, very few are made in Taiwan. But if in the last century, most AMD processors could be seen with label "Made In Taiwan"! As the "Diffused in USA", OK, I know years ago, many AMD processors were also diffused in Singapore, Assembly in Singapore or Malaysia. Later almost the entire AMD processors were diffused in Germany. Taiwan has their own semi factory, so there would be hope that AMD processors would be diffused in Taiwan too. I just wish you understand and read the whole sentence of others before making any other unfair judgement!

atlasminor
Challenger
Challenger

Re: My $500 paperweight

Saw the Asus Prime x370-Pro release notes March 2, immediatly recomended it to everyone. It has just about everything a person could ever need right about now.

I other words, <3 your choice. 5 way optimization, full official review found here from Asus

ASUS PRIME X370-Pro AM4 Motherboard overview - YouTube

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black_zion
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: My $500 paperweight

Plus there's the fact that ASUS has Windows 7 support for the X370-Pro, whereas they don't for the Crosshair IV.

dark3063
Journeyman III
Journeyman III

Re: My $500 paperweight

read the whole sentence of others before making any other unfair judgement

no i did read your whole sentence you didn't explain as that in the first place and its kind of hard not to view it as my comment because china is invading the Taiwanese people and trying to change everything about them as amd diffused and changed where things are manufactured so much it was a bit off for something that had such a short run compared to the other diffused places

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black_zion
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: My $500 paperweight

I figured since I was waiting on my motherboard from Amazon and bracket from Corsair, I went ahead and bought Amazon.com: Samsung 960 EVO Series - 250GB PCIe NVMe - M.2 Internal SSD (MZ-V6E250BW): Computers & A... to be my OS drive. I wanted the 500GB model but after spending over $500 on the 1800X it just wasn't there in my budget. The question is can I get Windows 7 to install on it...Came across Installing Win7 x64 on Samsung 950 Pro  NVMe - Windows 7 Help Forums which led to Recommended AHCI/RAID and NVMe Drivers and the bare drivers...Going to be SO MUCH FUN!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (ugh)

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black_zion
Esteemed Contributor III

Re: My $500 paperweight

So, my 1800X (I keep wanting to say X1800, which was a really horrid video card) will be up and running as soon as Amazon gets my X370-Pro to me, Corsair gets my bracket to me, and Amazon gets my Samsung 960 Evo to me, so I went ahead and ran 4 benchmarks that I'm going to compare the two processors with. The first is Haven, it's still a synthetic, but I like it better than 3DMark in terms of judging performance, as 3DMark is more about performing badly no matter what you have, while Haven is more about performing more like an actual game would. The second is the built in CPU-z benchmark. The third is the Blender test using the same file AMD used in their demonstration (that's 2:38.69 render time, I forgot it kept looping and it was partway through when I took the shot). The last is a Samsung Magician benchmark on my games drive (non OS), and is being used to compare the SATA performance between the 990FX (and to an extent the 500, 600, 700, and 800 series chipset SATA performance because AMD hasn't had a truly new chipset since 2005 or so), mainly as far as IOPS performance goes, which as you can see is quite a bit lower than its rating.

I had PLANNED to run the Prime95 benchmark but that'd take ages and generate a result file pages long, so no. And of course, I will still be using Windows 7, but on a fresh install (UGH!) on my new 960 Evo NVMe drive.

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janagewen
Challenger
Challenger

Re: My $500 paperweight

I am so interested in the benchmark provided by the CPU-Z, it almost tells the true story about the actual performance of processors. I used it to benchmark Pentium E6300 (2.8GHz) and Athlon II 245(2.9GHz), it did really tell the story because the scores of the former is much higher the latter. Yeah, that exposes the actual performance of a processor. From  http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Zen/AMD-Ryzen%207%201800X.html , one could find Ryzen 7 1800X is a 8 core processors (16 threads available). But I have no ideas why that CPU-Z just recognises only 8 threads and makes it grey. The score of single thread is 1337, but 8 (or 16) threads just perform such a lower score, I feel its performance it is not that idealised. Because 1337 x 8 = 10 696, if 16 threads enabled, the final score should be above on it, but the score of 7706 seems a little bit disappointed without seeing the improvements brought up by the newly introduced SMT feature. In other words, the whole performance of this processor does not seem so balanced. Or the mutual locks represent  the bottlenecks exposing the weakness on this revolutionary microarchitecture. I could not documents on the AMD version of SMT, will it work similar as Intel Hyper Threading? I would fear about that, because HT is much more difficult to implement, so I might guess AMD possibly use another simpler technology to implement their SMT feature. In the abandoned Alpha/AMD Hammer Microarchitecture, Alpha implemented a very special SMT, like the integer core found on AMD Bulldozer microarchitecture, but two threads could be combined together to build up an even thicker thread. SMT is also very common for PowerPC processors, such as IBM PowerPC processors and SIT CELL processors. They are very simple, each scalar contain only one thread. There are no concepts found on Intel HT. When working as an AIX maintainer, I found the performance improved a little bit when enabled SMT.

SMT and Multi Core look similar, but have a very different and even opposite motivation. Multi-Core design is using more and more affordable computing cores to boost the applications to extends; while the SMT is designed to make full use of the current infrastructure provided by the microarchitecture, especially when only one thread exist, the resources are hard to fully utilised. This happens when superscalar and pipelining technology are introduced into processor design. 

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atlasminor
Challenger
Challenger

Re: My $500 paperweight

The X370 is the full-fat Frappuccino of the bunch. It’s the only one that unlocks Ryzen’s ability to split PCIe lanes between a pair of x16 slots for double-barreled SLI or CrossFireX. Teaming GPUs is practically required for 4K gaming at 60 FPS and max settings....

What Asus is  officially boasting:

Which ASUS AM4 motherboard should I buy for Ryzen? - Edge Up

I'm liking the new look HTLM5 is doing, very easy to navigate. The pricing on these is absolutely crazy affordable. Price chart at bottom of article. Would have chose this if not for receiving Skylake model recently, not by choice, an couldn't use AMD for it because of the way its built.

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