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Esteemed Contributor III

Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

AMD’s Ryzen 7 family reignited the desktop performance wars last year after nearly seven years of small iterative improvements. The company’s Zen architecture proved more competitive than most expected, and AMD’s top-end desktop cores ruled the multi-threaded roost until Coffee Lake — and arguably past that, given how hard it was to find Coffee Lake in stock during October and November of last year. AMD has already told investors and enthusiasts to expect a new Zen CPU core in the not-too-distant future, but this new revision is a refinement of the existing chip built on GlobalFoundries tuned 14nm process (rebranded as 12nm). The performance jumps from these improvements tend to be smaller, but this is also AMD’s first chance to clean up any low-hanging fruit from Ryzen’s debut and to improve overall performance, which could point the way to larger-than-typical gains.

2700X-Leak

We don’t know much about how Ryzen+’s clock-for-clock perf will stack up against chips like the Ryzen 7 1800X, but it looks like the revised cores will pack a modest clock speed gain, especially if AMD is more aggressive about holding turbo clocks at high core ratios. If these figures are accurate for the Ryzen 7 2700X, we can make some guesses about a possible Ryzen 7 2800X as well. A 3.9GHz base clock and, say, 4.3GHz boost clock combined with a 4GHz all-core boost would capture an 8 percent clock jump under full load. If AMD has found any small issues to clean up simultaneously — call it 2-3 percent worth of performance — then Ryzen+ could deliver a 7-10 percent gain year-on-year over and above first-generation Ryzen processors.

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Image by Computerbase.de

Is that going to drive an upgrade cycle for existing Ryzen owners? Probably not. But Ryzen+ isn’t intended to reinvent the wheel. Having debuted a brand-new architecture to general acclaim, AMD needs to demonstrate it can iterate on that architecture to continue improving it and that it has picked the right partner to work with on future CPU designs. GlobalFoundries, of course, has its own interest in demonstrating it’s the proper partner for AMD’s efforts as well. The third and final component of this demonstration will be proving that AMD and GlobalFoundries can bring competitive products to market based on GF’s 7nm technology, but that won’t happen until 2019 or 2020. For now, clearing this second hurdle will help demonstrate that AMD will be delivering consistent quality updates over time.

The other reason AMD is likely gunning for higher clocks is so it can open more distance between itself and the Core i7-8700K. When we reviewed the 8700K, we noted that its high single-thread performance and excellent multi-threading perf were enough to make it a stronger overall recommendation than the 1800X. If AMD picks up another 8-10 percent performance, the hypothetical Ryzen 7 2800X should start to open up distance between itself and the Core i7-8700K again.

Finally, these clock speed increases will help reduce the impact of performance deficits that remain between Intel and AMD in specific tests. We don’t know much at this point, but this hypothetical Ryzen 7 2700X ticks all the major boxes — it opens up the throttle, improves performance in the process, and will give AMD a modest competitive boost.

Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs - ExtremeTech

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Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

Honestly I wish they'd just work on the Turbo algorithms and chip binning so it actually...works. How many threads have we seen on here about Turbo not working, because it has to be a weakly threaded application? Take the 1800X for example, 4ghz turbo speed sounds good, but if it can never kick in then what's the point? It's something they call out in the article, but I'm not expecting it to materialize, more than likely 2-3% performance gain under real world usage is what should be expected, along with a little better power efficiency due to the node shrink. Memory compatibility should be improved as well, another thing which is sorely needed given the fact that DDR4 prices are insane right now, 2x8GB G.Skill Flare DDR4-3200 is $250!

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Exemplar
Exemplar

Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

I thought performance boost II was a big part of these pinnacle ridge chips?  Of course, in the case of the 1800X, I just shut performance boost off and upped p-state 0 to 4.0 GHz.  Problem solved.

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Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

Yes I think it is the new big feature and that it boosts all cores and not just 2. I think it's funny you said you turn this off and just force all cores to be at boost clock. It's like not much has changed in the AMD camp. This is exactly what people did with the Phenom II's .

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Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

That is usually what happens with most enthusiasts.  Generally high end CPU coolers are employed which can handle the extra heat generated by running all cores at boost clock.  The nice thing about p-state overclocking is the chip can still down volt to lower energy states when idle.  I think in the Phenom II days the only option was to make it run at the overclocked speed on all cores all the time.

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Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

Yep very true!

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Miniboss
Miniboss

Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

Exaggerated topic headline - the "boost" looks very minor to me not to say marginal at best!

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Esteemed Contributor III

Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

Well it really just depends on expectations. If the new chip along with the new chipset fix the stability issues, and compatibility issues (the ones causing compilers to error)  then they also have a minimum 10% core increase speed, coupled with boost now spanning across ALL cores then yes you have a pretty good leap forward especially for what is not really a generational change, just an enhancement. As always it's up to us as consumers to decide if it is what they promote it as.

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Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

Well, the title does suggest that leaked "data" shows the new chips have significantly higher clocks than the previous "Summit Ridge" iteration.  No data is presented however, and the only leaked data I could find actually seems to show the opposite.

The leaked slides actually suggest that the Ryzen 7 2700X is the replacement for the 1800X and there will be no 2800X, at least not right away.  That means the top Pinnacle Ridge processor has a base clock of 3.7 GHz, vs 3.6 GHz on Summit Ridge, an increase of 2.78%.  For me, that isn't really significant.

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Re: Leaked Ryzen 7 2700X Data Suggests Significant Clock Boost for New AMD CPUs

So it looks like the Ryzen 7 2700X will replace both the 1700X and the 1800X.  WCCFTech posted a few numbers they pulled from Firestrike.

AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3DMark Benchmarks Leaked, 18% Faster vs 1700X & Cheaper

Sounds like the processor tops out at a 4.4 GHz overclock instead of 4.0 GHz as previously seem with the 1800X, so that is still a 10% bump which isn't bad.

Memory compatibility has been ramped up as well.  But what is really interesting is the precision boost overdrive feature.  Apparently the processor will automatically maximize your precision boost on all cores based on your cooling solution.  Effectively, you have a automatic p-state overclock.  The caveat is, only the X version of the processors support this feature, and only on the X470 chipset.

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