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Adept II
Adept II

What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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I was just wondering and intrigued. The world records set for highest overclocks from CPU-Z Validator World Records all use AMD chips (GO RED TEAM) and are reached only with liquid nitrogen. Even then its only lasts until the record is set. Afterwards the CPU is rendered unusable or destroyed.

I was wondering if there was another cooling solution that is able to let the AMD CPU attain 9GHz and run stable 24/7 with the only requirements being able to fit in a 9x9 foot room and up to $10,000. So heat and power consumption would not be factors in such a solution.

Like how much of an overclock would you get with something like this LD PC-V10 Phase Change - Black White - LD Cooling Computer Cases?

I do not know the power draw of a 9GHz overclock but what about these... Koolance EX2-1055​ (can handle 900W) or Koolance ERM-3K3UA​ (can handle 2700W)?

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Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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Hey vegasecurea,

This is a great question not asked by many here in the forums. So here's the answer, although not exactly the one you're probably searching for considering your interest and readiness to invest to make this a reality.

Regardless of the cooling situation provided by the end user this is always the end result. Once the end user begins to overclock past a certain frequency regardless of optimal conditions, stability degrades and multi-core functionality begins to break down (Usually anywhere above the 5.4Ghz threshold at a maximum). That being said, this is why overclockers competing to attain such high frequencies generally work on a single core of a multi-core FX chip that has prime silicon (a "lottery chip"), then using the LN2, they then generally apply voltages of 2.0+ Volts. They then need to operate the CPU at their attained frequency for a short duration selected prior to the event that they deem acceptable to be considered "qualifying".

With that being said, in short, these extreme overclocks are attained for incredibly short durations and under "controlled" situations as mentioned above. That's not including the fact that these overclocks are generally attained by teams of highly experienced overclocking enthusiasts who have a combined hundred or so years of experience in handling situations that may present themselves. To even fathom reproducing such an overclock on a single core of an FX-CPU, solo is nearly impossible, it can be done, but by only a handful of talented individuals and most assuredly never as a daily driver. This is currently impossible and always will be on any currently available central processing units coupled with any cooling situation or regulators on the market today, whether consumer or industrial/server grade.

Also, one must keep in mind that these world record overclocks are performed on motherboards that (although modified) are available to the general public, which means they are the highest quality available. These motherboards simply aren't capable of maintaining their integrity under these conditions and their circuitry would degrade shortly after attempting to operate the central processing unit and system in general at such power levels, in short it would fry, just as they do during overclocking competitions for short durations, let alone operating 24/7..Sadly, once again, it's juts not feasible.

Then there's the factor of consistent data corruption which would reproduce itself in new and interesting ways you've never seen before, never allowing you to grasp what the issue was to begin with, because if, somehow you were successful in not destroying the chip, system and possibly your home in a whole the first go around, you'd be welcomed with the fact that you now need to reinstall your operating system due to data corruption (oh happy days ).

This data corruption anomaly is likely even at more feasible multi-core overclocking frequencies such as 5.4Ghz, as the chip wasn't designed to operate as such. So, although a 5.4Ghz multi-core overclocking frequency is likely pending you receive the highest quality silicon and ensured the optimal conditions throughout your system, any higher would likely fail and fail quickly. So, overall not only is such a desired 9.0Ghz+ frequency not possible as a daily driver, but it is incredibly dangerous, not only to your system, but to your well being. This simply isn't something that should be attempted, unless in a controlled professional environment, with fire extinguishers at the ready and someone at the breaker to cut off power in the case something goes wrong.

Anyways, I hope this answers your question and if there's anything else you'd like me to touch on, feel free to ask away and I or another experienced overclocker from the AMD community would be happy to reply. Have a nice day.

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Miniboss
Miniboss

Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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You also have to realize that the heat the CPU produces is not only on the heatspreader itself. The motherboard socket itself also gets very hot. Also, there is still a delay between cooling of the CPU to the actual heat produced as well. I'm sure that if someone where to push enough voltage through a CPU to run at a stable 9GHz, that the CPU would either burn out immediately, the metals inside the CPU die would melt, or the solder on the motherboard would melt. Its an interesting idea though, but its possible that the limitations of modern technology will stop this from being reality currently.

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Exemplar
Exemplar

Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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no way u can run it with 9GHz 24/7 with current chips -> maybe 6,5GHz with unlimited LN2 and selfmade headspreader for backside of MoBo AND a perfect air-flow // but wont be cost-efficient and pretty dangerous

dont forget that you also stress every part of your pc with that kind of oc

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Forerunner
Forerunner

Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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I would make a medal of that CPU and put it on a golden chain around my neck.

In extreme OC videos they use flame throwers while using LN2 to avoid killing the CPU before its time and put a lot of stuff on the motherboard to avoid condensation. Currently I think its harder than putting a closed loop liquid cooling system and brake records.

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Adept II
Adept II

Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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Delidding the CPU would be a must I would think, that way heat exchange is more direct and efficient. AMD CPUs have a maximum 90 degree Celsius limit of operational temps so that's a lot of headroom to work with. And I would think overclocking the FSB would yield better results albeit more fine tuning as opposed to multiplier overclocking. From what I have read multiplier overclocking is simpler but pulls more power and heat. While FSB OCing pulls less for the same overclock so you can achieve a higher overclock for the same amount of power and heat, but requires more... savvy.

Does anyone out there have either...

LD PC-V10 Phase Change - Black White - LD Cooling Computer Cases

Koolance EX2-1055 or Koolance ERM-3K3UA?

I'd like to find out how high of a stable overclock you have achieved. Thanks in advance.

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Adept II
Adept II

Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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I suppose its still out of our technological reach. But LN2 cooling the RAM, North and Southbridges would help, no? lol.

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Miniboss
Miniboss

Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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Adjusting the FSB too much would change many components on the motherboard, and isn't really recommended unless you REALLY know what you're doing. Also, I think even if the CPU was de-lidded, the rate that the die would be cooled would most likely be slower than the rate in which the CPU is heating up. Also, to push the required amount of voltage to a CPU to keep it stable would require possible a custom PSU, Motherboard, and maybe even CPU

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Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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Hey vegasecurea,

This is a great question not asked by many here in the forums. So here's the answer, although not exactly the one you're probably searching for considering your interest and readiness to invest to make this a reality.

Regardless of the cooling situation provided by the end user this is always the end result. Once the end user begins to overclock past a certain frequency regardless of optimal conditions, stability degrades and multi-core functionality begins to break down (Usually anywhere above the 5.4Ghz threshold at a maximum). That being said, this is why overclockers competing to attain such high frequencies generally work on a single core of a multi-core FX chip that has prime silicon (a "lottery chip"), then using the LN2, they then generally apply voltages of 2.0+ Volts. They then need to operate the CPU at their attained frequency for a short duration selected prior to the event that they deem acceptable to be considered "qualifying".

With that being said, in short, these extreme overclocks are attained for incredibly short durations and under "controlled" situations as mentioned above. That's not including the fact that these overclocks are generally attained by teams of highly experienced overclocking enthusiasts who have a combined hundred or so years of experience in handling situations that may present themselves. To even fathom reproducing such an overclock on a single core of an FX-CPU, solo is nearly impossible, it can be done, but by only a handful of talented individuals and most assuredly never as a daily driver. This is currently impossible and always will be on any currently available central processing units coupled with any cooling situation or regulators on the market today, whether consumer or industrial/server grade.

Also, one must keep in mind that these world record overclocks are performed on motherboards that (although modified) are available to the general public, which means they are the highest quality available. These motherboards simply aren't capable of maintaining their integrity under these conditions and their circuitry would degrade shortly after attempting to operate the central processing unit and system in general at such power levels, in short it would fry, just as they do during overclocking competitions for short durations, let alone operating 24/7..Sadly, once again, it's juts not feasible.

Then there's the factor of consistent data corruption which would reproduce itself in new and interesting ways you've never seen before, never allowing you to grasp what the issue was to begin with, because if, somehow you were successful in not destroying the chip, system and possibly your home in a whole the first go around, you'd be welcomed with the fact that you now need to reinstall your operating system due to data corruption (oh happy days ).

This data corruption anomaly is likely even at more feasible multi-core overclocking frequencies such as 5.4Ghz, as the chip wasn't designed to operate as such. So, although a 5.4Ghz multi-core overclocking frequency is likely pending you receive the highest quality silicon and ensured the optimal conditions throughout your system, any higher would likely fail and fail quickly. So, overall not only is such a desired 9.0Ghz+ frequency not possible as a daily driver, but it is incredibly dangerous, not only to your system, but to your well being. This simply isn't something that should be attempted, unless in a controlled professional environment, with fire extinguishers at the ready and someone at the breaker to cut off power in the case something goes wrong.

Anyways, I hope this answers your question and if there's anything else you'd like me to touch on, feel free to ask away and I or another experienced overclocker from the AMD community would be happy to reply. Have a nice day.

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Adept II
Adept II

Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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Thank you savagebeastzero.

I guess then the follow up question would be what are the highest stable overclock that people are getting running 24/7. 5.4GHz seems low but if that's all current technology can handle 24/7 then so be it, lol.

Have you tried either of these products...

LD PC-V10 Phase Change - Black White - LD Cooling Computer Cases

Koolance EX2-1055 or Koolance ERM-3K3UA?

I'm more about highest stable overclock rather than the highest overclock achievable is why I ask. No point in buying the LD Cooling Computer Case if 5.4GHz is the highest stable by current standards. Which I am thinking a 360mm in push/pull can achieve. I would invest in the LD Cooling if only it can achieve a higher stable overclock than the 360mm (or a 420mm and 480mm for that matter).

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Adept II
Adept II

Re: What cooling solution for a 9GHz overclock?

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I'm running my FX-9590 stable at 4.9GHz with just my FX Series AIO Liquid Cooler. Its a 120mm AIO originally packaged with the FX-8150 WAY back when, 2011 if I remember correctly (has the FX logo in LED!). Its ancient by tech standards but rated to handle up to 4.7-4.8GHz.Yet it handles my 4.9GHz like a champ!  I couldn't get past 4.8GHz if using the multiplier due to the heat. But OCing through the FSB yields better results for the same heat output, hence 4.9. Would have been fantastic to run its advertised speed at 5GHz on a single 120mm AIO. So close and yet so far. I am waiting for my Thermaltake Water 3.0 Ultimate 360mm AIO now. I could have just went with a 240mm AIO but opt for the overclocking headroom the extra 120mms would give when I have the time to see how far of a stable overclock I can achieve. How much higher of a stable overclock do you think can be had from the 360mm I bought?

I am happy AMD sells factory overclocked versions of their processors. I was one of those people who wanted to run an overclocked cpu but didn't want to do the legwork due to budget constraints, laziness, inconvenience, no time to, afraid to, or a combination thereof, lol. But after practicing and trial and error I'm more comfortable with leaving the safety zone and doing it myself.