AMD Business Blog - Page 2

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AMD Business Blog - Page 2

On August 7 this year, AMD changed the data center market with the launch of the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC™ processor, the world’s first 7nm and highest performance x86 data center CPU. We hosted an amazing launch event in San Francisco, joined by leading industry partners including Google, Twitter, HPE, Lenovo and others, where we showcased the world record performance[ii], breakthrough architecture and broad ecosystem support for the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC family.

Since launch, we have seen significant traction with customers and partners. They recognize the overall breakthrough performance, and the superior single socket performance of the 2nd Gen EPYC vs. the competition. As well, they know our higher core counts and support for compelling features like PCIe® 4.0 make AMD EPYC the right choice for the future of the data center.

Today, we are proud to have new platforms from Dell and new customers pledging to use the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC for cloud, HPC and even 5G. And with the original codename of “Rome,” what better place to reach this next round of milestones than Rome, Italy.

Earlier today I was joined by our CTO Mark Papermaster, as well as our incredible European team and customers, to share the latest progress with our 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors and introduce our newest customers. Here are the highlights:

  • Yesterday, Dell EMC announced five new PowerEdge platforms using the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processor. These platforms were designed from the ground-up and optimized to support the features of the new AMD EPYC processor including PCI® 4.0. You can read more about the new PowerEdge systems here, including purchasing details for the new systems that are available now.
  • Satinder Sethi, GM of IBM Cloud infrastructure, joined me to discuss how IBM Cloud views performance and works to deliver it to its customers. Enterprises moving to cloud want higher levels of performance to support compute-intensive workloads for AI and big data, without jeopardizing security. Security is a critical component of IBM’s hybrid cloud strategy, and technologies like 2nd Gen EPYC with SEV-ES help drive new levels of security in the hybrid cloud era. IBM Cloud customers are also asking for better memory bandwidth for big data and analytics workloads. With 45% greater memory bandwidth in its class,[iii] 2nd Gen EPYC provides fantastic memory bandwidth scaling for big data and analytics workloads. Finally, the core scaling and breakthrough performance of 2nd Gen EPYC provides a superior quality of service and a higher level of performance for container workloads. IBM plans to have more to share in 2020 about its new performance offerings for clients.
  • Nokia joined AMD CTO, Mark Papermaster, on stage and talked about the potential performance implications of the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processor for 4G and 5G networks. Nokia has tested 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors in its Cloud Packet Core system, which helps service providers deliver converged broadband, IoT, and machine-type communication services while evolving to a 5G core. In these tests, the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors are providing an 80% increase in packet throughput performance compared to previous solutions. This means that with AMD EPYC, Nokia is providing its customers better capacity, performance and scale for their networks.
  • European pure player cloud provider OVHcloud showcased an upcoming high-end hosting instance that is based on the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processor, specifically the EPYC™ 7402P. The EPYC processor is used in a full flash server and the instances will be available at the end of 2019.
  • TSMC joined us on stage to highlight its capacity and capabilities for 7nm fabrication and it also announced its adoption of AMD EPYC processors helping power its next gen research and leading process technology
  • Finally, ATOS and its customer Genci, which fosters the use of supercomputing for the benefit of French scientific communities, joined me to highlight Genci’s use of the ATOS BullSequana X system using the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processor. Genci specifically chose the 2nd Gen EPYC due to its TCO and fantastic sustained performance efficiency per watt. Additionally, ATOS and AMD showcased a new 2nd Gen AMD EPYC SKU specifically designed for HPC customers that need the highest performance and can support liquid cooling. The AMD EPYC 7H12 is a 64 core/128 thread, 280W part[iv] with a 2.6Ghz base frequency and 3.3Ghz max boost frequency that performs ~11% better at LINPACK compared to the AMD EPYC 7742 in testing by ATOS on their BullSequana XH2000 platform. The AMD EPYC 7H12 is being used by Genci, CSC Finland and Uninett in Norway.

Today we continued to take EPYC to new heights. We are thrilled to have the ecosystem supporting us across hardware, software and cloud providers as we face the challenges of the modern data center head-on with 2nd Gen AMD EPYC. You can find numerous OEMs and channel partners that are selling platforms with the new EPYC processors here.

Expect to hear more from us and our partners this year as we continue to expand our reach with the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processor.

Forrest Norrod is the SVP and GM of the Datacenter and Embedded Solutions Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

 

Cautionary Statement

This blog contains forward-looking statements concerning Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) including, but not limited to the features, functionality, performance, availability, timing, expectations and expected benefits of the 2nd Gen AMD EPYCTM processors and the expected timing and benefits of new partner offerings,  which are made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are commonly identified by words such as "would," "may," "expects," "believes," "plans," "intends," "projects" and other terms with similar meaning. Investors are cautioned that the forward-looking statements in this blog are based on current beliefs, assumptions and expectations, speak only as of the date of this blog and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations. Such statements are subject to certain known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond AMD's control, that could cause actual results and other future events to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. Investors are urged to review in detail the risks and uncertainties in AMD's Securities and Exchange Commission filings, including but not limited to AMD's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended June 29, 2019.

 

A 2P EPYC™ 7742 processor powered server has SPECrate®2017_int_peak score of 749, and a int_base score of 682 https://spec.org/cpu2017/results/res2019q3/cpu2017-20190722-16242.html as of August 7, 2019. The next highest peak score is a 2P Intel Platinum 9282 server at 676, base 643: http://spec.org/cpu2017/results/res2019q3/cpu2017-20190624-15369.pdf as of July 28, 2019. SPEC®, SPECrate® and SPEC CPU® are registered trademarks of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation. See www.spec.org for more information. ROM-91.

[ii] See https://www.amd.com/en/processors/epyc-world-records for details.

[iii] EPYC™ 7002 series has 8 memory channels, supporting 3200 MHz DIMMs yielding 204.8 GB/s of bandwidth vs. the same class of Intel Scalable Gen 2 processors with only 6 memory channels and supporting 2933 MHz DIMMs yielding 140.8 GB/s of bandwidth. 204.8 / 140.8 = 1.454545 - 1.0 = .45 or 45% more.  AMD EPYC has 45% more bandwidth. Class based on industry-standard pin-based (LGA) X86 processors. ROM-11

[iv] EPYC 7H12 processor boost frequencies may be achieved only with a cooling solution that meets group ‘Z’ requirements.  Achievable boost frequencies may vary depending on the effectiveness of the actual cooling solution. ROM-282

Based on Atos testing of HPL v2.1 benchmark, as of September 13, 2019, using a 2P AMD EPYC™ 7H12 powered production server versus AMD internal testing of HPL v2.1 benchmark, as of July 17, 2019, using a 2P AMD EPYC™ 7742 powered AMD reference server. AMD has not independently verified the 7H12 scores. Results may vary. ROM-287

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This is an EPYC revolution! The history of AMD innovation continues today with the launch and availability of select AMD EPYC™ 7002 Series Processors. The second-generation milestone in the AMD EPYC family builds on the disruptive datacenter products that AMD first established with the original EPYC™ 7001 Series. With the first 7nm x86 server technology, first PCIe® Gen 4 readiness1, and the first x86 server architecture with DDR4-32001 we bring expectation-shattering performance and exceptional scalability to your data center ecosystem with our new lineup.

 

Architectural innovations in AMD EPYC 7002 Series Processors are designed to deliver exceptional performance with unique security features, for a variety of workloads that matter to you -  on traditional bare metal, software defined, converged and hyper-converged infrastructures in private, public, and hybrid cloud environments. We know today’s connected world is unleashing huge quantities of data every second. Data center operational cost efficiency, space optimization, and faster application response times are critical.  AMD EPYC addresses them all and today we are announcing 80 world records across our ecosystem.

 

Let’s take a closer look at how the ecosystem around AMD EPYC 7002 Series Processors enable support for your business:

 

Ready today with support for major operating systems and hypervisors

AMD has close relationships and joint engineering engagements with major operating systems and hypervisor vendors enabling key features and optimizations. A key focus of AMD EPYC 7002 Series Processors are the security features to help defend your CPU, applications, and data. Data centers around the globe are constantly adapting to securely meet the current workload demands while planning for future needs. Secure Memory Encryption (SME) uses a single key to encrypt system memory and Secure Encrypted Virtualization (SEV) and further extends that feature by enabling each guest in a public or private cloud instance to be encrypted by a unique key. With SME and SEV, users can have greater confidence the security capability surrounding their private data. The growing community of operating system vendors that support SEV includes Canonical, Fedora, Oracle, RedHat, and SUSE. VMware has also committed to support AMD security features in a future release of vSphere.

Comprehensive offering in High Performance Computing (HPC)

High performance computing (HPC) powers new technology advancements in academia and a wide array of industries across both the public and private sectors. Scientific research, public health, climate modeling, as well as oil and gas exploration are just a few examples where HPC is the driving force behind new innovations and knowledge discovery. (AMD CPUs and GPUs will power the new Frontier exascale supercomputer at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in 2021.) Innovative architecture of AMD EPYC™ 7002 Series brings tremendous performance and scalability for HPC applications, offering you a choice in x86 architecture while optimizing total cost of ownership.

 

The 4Vs of Big Data Analytics

Data is growing at exponential rates, often characterized by the 4Vs - Volume, Velocity,  Veracity and Value - big data analytics is fueling the digital transformation across industry, research and governments. The demand for computing power is increasing apace, but often IT budgets and data center space are not. AMD EPYC processors’ single socket with no compromise on features can offer the performance and efficiency for a broad set of big data analytics applications. World record benchmark results from our partners clearly demonstrate the high performance and lower cost of ownership advantages one processor can have compared to two socket systems from small to large scale.  Combined with larger and faster memory, massive I/O throughput and a high-speed network you can be ready to face any big data challenge.

 

Don’t forget Relational Databases

Relational databases continue to be central to mission-critical applications from transactional operations to decision support systems. The emergence of mobile technology is redefining the e-commerce across industry verticals. Complex online transactions and analytics to gain insights in real-time is a must for staying ahead in business today. AMD EPYC 7002 Series Processors bring hi-speed memory and high performance I/O to support high performance for data intensive applications. We are happy to announce new industry leading performance benchmark results today using relational database management systems with our ecosystem partners.

 

Number of virtual machines surpassed the number of physical machines a long time ago. It’s all about clouds – private and public

The AMD EPYC 7002 Series value proposition is simple: more cores open the door for more virtual machines, better consolidation, lower cost, and simpler management. 7nm technology enables powerful and efficient processors that are capable of delivering more performance at the same power2. AMD EPYC 7002 Series Processors' high core count, DDR4-3200 capable memory, high performance IO and connectivity with PCIe 4.0, security features and compelling energy efficiency are a strong match for today’s highly virtualized data center. Outstanding performance in VMmark®, SPECvirt® and TPCx-V are testaments to performance and efficiency. This provides strong value for all kinds of virtual environments, including VM dense applications (such as VDI), Containers, hyperconverged solutions (such as vSAN®, Nutanix®, HPE SimpliVity) and cloud native applications.

Offering the latest and greatest from the hardware ecosystem

We have a long history of being the first to bring key technologies to market. Today we announce support for PCI 4.0, doubling the bandwidth from PCIe® 3.0. Double the bandwidth is a HUGE improvement from the previous generation of AMD EPYC processors and first in the x86 server world.  This is a tremendous advantage in the data center, and will enable significant reduction in network interfaces cards, switch ports, cables, and of course management points. PCIe 4.0 also enables faster connectivity to high speed GPUs and accelerators, as well as NVMe devices.

 

We owe a big thanks to our partners

Today would not be possible without the incredible support of our ecosystem partners. Our broad partner ecosystem and collaborative engineering provide solutions that help deliver high performance and efficiency at lower total cost of ownership.

 

We are grateful to our partners who have collaborated with our engineers for a wide range of datacenter use cases:

Altair, Ansys, AWS, Beamr, Broadcom, Cadence, Canonical, Citrix, Cloudera, Cloudian, Couchbase, Dassault Systèmes, DataStax, Docker, ESI Group, Exasol, LSTC, MapR, Mavenir, Mellanox, MemSQL, Mentor Graphics, Microsoft, Micron, MongoDB, NetScout, MapR, Mavenir, Mentor Graphics, Microsoft, MongoDB, NetScout, Nokia, Nutanix, Oracle, Quobyte, Red Hat, Redis Labs, SAP, SAS, Samsung, ScaleMP, Siemens PLM, Splunk, StorMagic, SUSE, Synopsys, Transwarp, TigerGraph, Vertica, VMware, WekaIO, Xilinx.

 

 

Check out our documents here: Solutions Briefs and Performance Briefs.

 

 

  1. Some supported features and functionality of second-generation AMD EPYC™ processors (codenamed “Rome”) require a BIOS update from your server manufacturer when used with a motherboard designed for the first-generation AMD EPYC 7000 series processor.  A motherboard designed for “Rome” processors is required to enable all available functionality. ROM-06.
  2. EPYC-07: Based on June 8, 2018 AMD internal testing of same-architecture product ported from 14 to 7 nm technology with similar implementation flow/methodology, using performance from SGEMM. EPYC-07

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I’m pleased to announce AMD has joined other industry leaders in the Compute Express Link (CXL) Consortium. 

Compute Express Link (CXL) is an open industry standard interconnect offering high-bandwidth, low-latency connectivity between host processors, systems and devices such as accelerator cards, memory buffers, and smart I/O devices. Designed to address the increasing demands of high-performance computational workloads, CXL targets heterogeneous processing and memory systems across a range of high-performance computing applications by enabling coherency and memory semantics between processors and systems. This is increasingly important as processing data in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning requires a diverse mix of scalar, vector, matrix and spatial architectures across a range of accelerator options.

Since 2016 AMD has played a leadership role in driving three other new bus/interconnect standards, CCIX, OpenCAPI and Gen-Z.  Like CXL, these three efforts are driven by the need to create tighter coupling and coherency between processors and accelerators, and better exploit new and emerging memory/storage technologies in open, standards-based solutions.

While these different groups have been working to solve similar problems, each approach has its differences. As a long-standing supporter of open standards, we’re excited to join CXL and the possibilities presented as we work with other ecosystem leaders to address challenges we face as an industry.

If you’d like more information on CXL.  Please go to https://www.computeexpresslink.org/

MARK PAPERMASTER  

Executive Vice President and  Chief Technology Officer

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Our strong momentum continues to grow! Last week, we celebrated a solid first quarter and our company’s 50th anniversary. Today , Lisa joined U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Secretary Rick Perry, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL ) Director Thomas Zacharia and Cray CEO Peter Ungaro to announce that AMD EPYCTM CPUs, Radeon Instinct GPUs, and Radeon Open Ecosystem (ROCm) and EPYC open source software will power what is expected to be the world’s fastest supercomputer, called “Frontier.”

 

ORNL’s Frontier supercomputer aims to deliver more than 1.5 exaflops of performance. That level of performance exceeds the combined performance of today’s 160 fastest supercomputers! Scheduled to be online in 2021, the Frontier system will allow researchers to advance science in such applications as systems biology, materials science, energy production, additive manufacturing and health data science. Visit the Frontier website  to learn more about the areas of exploration.

 

AMD is delighted to partner with the DOE, Cray and ORNL to push the frontiers of HPC and lead the industry into the exascale era. This is one of the finest examples of a public and private partnership. AMD has a long history of working on HPC and is a strong partner for ORNL and DOE. In 2012, the DOE started a series of programs to push research that would enable future exascale compute systems. As part of this, AMD Research collaborated on FastForward, DesignForward, and PathForward – DOE programs that include public/private partnerships focused on key areas of chip, system, and software development to push the boundaries of high-performance computing. As the collaboration progressed, it evolved from research to product development, with exascale technologies incorporated into both our EPYC CPUs and Radeon Instinct GPUs for the datacenter. This partnership and shared vision around exascale computing drove our selection as the CPU and GPU provider for the Frontier project. We are incredibly excited to be a part of this program.

At the heart of the Frontier system is a future AI and HPC optimized AMD EPYC processor and a purpose-built AMD Radeon Instinct GPU in a 4:1 GPU to CPU configuration. The Radeon Instinct GPU also contains high-bandwidth memory allowing it to achieve very high throughput of data, while keeping power low and saving space. AMD’s Infinity Fabric will support high-speed connections between processors. The joint optimization of all these elements together enables us to hit this historic performance in each node of the system. Cray’s Slingshot scalable interconnect will handle the complex processing and communication of HPC and AI applications between nodes and between cabinets. The Frontier system will be supported by an enhanced version of AMD’s ROCm programming environment for AMD CPUs and GPUs.

 

Our strategy at AMD is about enabling high performance computing and we have an incredibly strong CPU and GPU roadmap, now more than ever optimized together. We believe supercomputing is at the forefront of the computer architecture innovation. Technology that is driving systems like Frontier is re-defining the standard for future high-performance datacenters.

 

Thank you to the thousands of dedicated employees who had a hand in this project. The science that the Frontier system enables will help solve some of the world’s toughest and most important challenges. This is another very proud day for AMD and demonstrates to the world that we have the technologies, vision and talent to lead the high-performance computing industry forward.

MARK PAPERMASTER  

Executive Vice President and  Chief Technology Officer

FORREST NORROD

Senior Vice President and General Manager

Datacenter and Embedded Solutions Group  

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As AMD celebrates 50 years as a company, one of our latest innovations for the enterprise, the AMD EPYC™ processors, have gained momentum across datacenter and cloud computing segments. One of the key areas where we see tremendous traction is in hyperconverged infrastructures (HCI). Today we are excited to announce a technology partnership with Nutanix, an established leader in hyperconvergence delivering a full software stack that integrates compute, virtualization, storage, networking and security to power applications at scale.

 

AMD and Nutanix have worked together on optimizing Nutanix’s hyperconverged software, Acropolis OS, on AMD EPYC processors. The teams have been collaborating closely for several months and look forward to bringing Nutanix validated EPYC processor-based servers to the market from leading server OEM manufacturers.

Nutanix has already embarked on the path for enabling choice in hypervisors by enabling support for its own AHV, as well as VMWare ESXi®, and Microsoft® Hyper-V, and with the enablement of these hypervisors on EPYC, AMD and Nutanix will be increasing x86 CPU choice for datacenter customers.

Together AMD and Nutanix are bringing out the true value of the EPYC processor, leveraging its impressive PCIe® connectivity, memory bandwidth and memory capacity. In addition to the TCO savings that customers can get with Nutanix hyperconvergence software, AMD and Nutanix are optimizing on AMD EPYC processor-powered single socket servers to enable even further TCO savings to datacenter customers. We expect the combined EPYC processor + Nutanix solution to shine on several workloads such as VDI, virtualized storage, and containerized applications.

EPYC Processor Hyperconvergence

The AMD EPYC processor is ideally suited for hyperconvergence by providing high performance compute coupled with impressive I/O for native connectivity to storage. EPYC System-on-Chip (SoC) performance scales linearly and uniformly across cores helping minimize performance variation within applications.

Designed from the ground up for a new generation of solutions, AMD EPYC implements a philosophy of choice without restriction. Choose the number of cores and sockets that meet your needs without sacrificing key features like memory and I/O.

Each EPYC SoC can have from 8 to 32 cores with access to incredible amounts of I/O and memory regardless of the number of cores in use, including 128 PCIe® lanes, and support for up to 2 TB of high-speed memory per socket.

The AMD + Nutanix journey has just begun. Stay tuned for updates; fully supported Nutanix solutions on EPYC based OEM servers are planned for summer 2019.

AMD is proudly sponsoring Nutanix.NEXT 2019. We look forward to seeing you at the event where you can learn more on the value that Nutanix and AMD bring to customers deploying HCI.

Raghu Nambiar is the CVP & CTO of Datacenter Ecosystems & Application Engineering at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

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dtjong
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We understand your business. You need fast devices to keep up with your business, security features to help keep your data safe and manageability to keep your fleet organized and up to date. Upgrade Your Experience and Get more from your notebook with 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ PRO and Athlon™ PRO processors.

Get More Productive

No one likes dealing with slow and unresponsive notebooks. With all those tasks running in the background from virus scanners to OS updates, a system can start to feel a little sluggish.
Our latest Ryzen™ 7 PRO 3700U processor with up to 4 cores and 8 threads is up to 2.8 times faster than our older AMD PRO A12-9800B APUs.1 Ryzen™ PRO processors represent AMD’s next generation of performance, which means less waiting and more doing at the workplace.

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Get More Creative

Radeon™ Vega Graphics is not just for gaming but also helps accelerate the workplace. Premium graphics helps employees drive 4K displays for additional screen real estate, accelerate media playback for smooth video and speeds up creative tasks. With a Ryzen™ PRO mobile processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics experience up to 36% faster photo editing, 64% faster 3D modeling and 258% faster medical visualization over the competition.2,3

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Get More Portable

No power outlets available? No Problem. Notebooks powered by Ryzen™ PRO and Athlon™ PRO processors are designed for the 9-5 workday. Get up to 12 hours of general office use or up to 10 hours of video playback with the AMD Ryzen™ PRO 7 3700U processor. 4

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Get More Security Features

The global average cost of a data device breach is $3.86 Million.5 Ryzen™ PRO processors help protect against malicious data attacks from the moment of power-on with Secure Boot, lock down Windows 10 enterprise systems with Microsoft Device Guard enhanced with AMD GuardMI technology and help defend against attack to your system RAM (aka Cold Boot Attacks) with memory encryption. AMD Ryzen™ PRO and Athlon™ PRO processors is the only processor family with full memory encryption as a standard security feature. 6

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Get More Pro Options

With AMD PRO processors we don’t force you to purchase premium more expensive solutions to get the security and professional features that enterprises need. So whether you want a Ryzen PRO 7, 5, 3 or Athlon Pro processors, you can choose the right performance level you need for your business without sacrificing on enterprise security and manageability features.

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Click Here to learn more about the new 2nd Gen Ryzen™ PRO and Athlon™ PRO processors.

David Tjong, Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of January 10, 2019. Cinebench 1T used to measure CPU Single Thread Performance. Performance presented in A12-9800B (100%) vs Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U scored a 152.0475, Ryzen 7 PRO 2700U scored a 140.1425 while the A12-9800B scored a 84.75 for a comparison of 152.0475/84.75=1.79 and 140.1425/84.75=1.65 respectively. Cinebench nT used to measure CPU Multi Thread Performance. Performance presented in A12-9800B (100%) vs Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U scored a 688.4775, Ryzen 7 PRO 2700U scored a 634.345 while the A12-9800B scored a 240 for a comparison of 688.4775/240=2.87 and 634.345/240=2.64 respectively. PCMark 10 used to measure System Performance. Performance presented in A12-9800B (100%) vs Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U scored a 4075.5, Ryzen 7 PRO 2700U scored a 3494 while the A12-9800B scored a 2547.33 for a comparison of 4075.5/2547.33=1.60 and 3494/2547.33=1.37 respectively. 3DMark 11 Performance used to measure Graphics Performance. Performance presented in A12-9800B (100%) vs Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U scored a 4432.25, Ryzen 7 PRO 2700U scored a 4125 while the A12-9800B scored a 1947 for a comparison of 4432.25/1947=2.28 and 4125/1947=2.12 respectively. System Configurations: AMD Ryzen™ 7 PRO 3700U, 2x4GB DDR4, Radeon™ Vega 10 Graphics (driver 25.20.14102.16), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows® 10 Pro x64 AMD Ryzen™ 7 PRO 2700U, 2x4GB DDR4, Radeon™ Vega 10 Graphics (driver 25.20.14102.16), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows® 10 Pro x64 AMD PRO A12-9800B, 2x4GB DDR4, Radeon™ R7 Graphics (driver 22.19.662.4), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows® 10 Pro x64 PCMark and 3DMark are registered trademarks of Futuremark Corporation. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. All scores in are an average of 3 runs with the same settings. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. PP-7
2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of January 10, 2019 “Photo Editing defined as a scripted series of photo filters in Photoshop presented in i7-8650U (Dell Latitude 7490) (100%) vs Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U took 52.9 seconds to complete, while the i7-8650U took 71.9 seconds for a comparison of (71.9-52.9)/52.9=1.36 | SPECView Perf 13 3DSMax used to measure 3D Modeling Performance. Performance presented in i7-8650U (Dell Latitude 7490) (100%) vs Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U scored a 24.265 while the i7-8650U scored a 14.7525 for a comparison of 24.265/14.7525=1.64 | SPECView Perf 13 Medical used to measure Medical Viewset Performance. Performance presented in i7-8650U (Dell Latitude 7490) (100%) vs Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U scored a 7.84 while the i7-8650U scored a 2.19 for a comparison of 7.84/2.1875=3.58 | PCMark 10 DCC Subtest used to measure Content Creation Performance. Performance presented in i7-8650U (Dell Latitude 7490) (100%) vs Ryzen 7 PRO 3700U scored a 3595.25 while the i7-8650U scored a 3162 for a comparison of 3595.25/3162=1.14 | System Configurations: AMD Ryzen™ 7 PRO 3700U, 2x4GB DDR4, Radeon™ Vega 10 Graphics (driver 25.20.14102.16), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows® 10 Pro x64 | Intel i7-8650U, Dell Latitude 7490, 2x4GB DDR4, Intel UHD 620 Graphics (driver 22.20.16.4799), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows® 10 Pro x64 PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. All scores in are an average of 3 runs with the same settings. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. PP-10
3. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of January 10, 2019 Photo Editing defined as a scripted series of photo filters in Photoshop presented in i5-8350U (Dell Latitude 7490) (100%) vs Ryzen 5 PRO 3500U took 56.1 seconds to complete, while the i5-8350U took 75.4 seconds for a comparison of (75.4-56.1)/56.1=1.34 | SPECView Perf 13 3DSMax used to measure 3D Modeling Performance. Performance presented in i5-8350U (Dell Latitude 7490) (100%) vs Ryzen 5 PRO 3500U scored a 23.8125 while the i5-8350U (Dell Latitude 7490) scored a 14.06 for a comparison of 23.8125/14.06=1.69 | SPECView Perf 13 Medical used to measure Medical Viewset Performance. Performance presented in i5-8350U (Dell Latitude 7490) (100%) vs Ryzen 5 PRO 3500U scored a 7.2825 while the i5-8350U (Dell Latitude 7490) scored a 2.1125 for a comparison of 7.2825/2.1125=3.45 | PCMark 10 DCC Subtest used to measure Content Creation Performance. Performance presented in i5-8350U (Dell Latitude 7490) (100%) vs Ryzen 5 PRO 3500U scored a 3404.25 while the i5-8350U (Dell Latitude 7490) scored a 2977.5 for a comparison of 3404.25/2977.5=1.14 | System Configurations: AMD Ryzen™ 5 PRO 3500U, 2x4GB DDR4, Radeon™ Vega 8 Graphics (driver 25.20.14102.16), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows® 10 Pro x64 | Intel i5-8350U, Dell Latitude 7490, 2x4GB DDR4, Intel UHD 620 Graphics (driver 22.20.16.4799), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows® 10 Pro x64 | PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. All scores in are an average of 3 runs with the same settings. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. PP-11
4. Testing by AMD performance labs as of 12/4/2018. “Battery life” defined as hours of continuous usage before the system automatically shuts down due to depleted battery. Video playback tested according to Microsoft WER methodology, while “general usage” is tested via MobileMark® 2014 1.5. Results presented in minutes, in order of: 1st Gen AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U Mobile Processor (100%) vs. 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ 7 3700U Mobile Processor. General Usage: Ryzen™ 7 2700U: 8.1 hours vs. Ryzen™ 7 3700U: 12.3 hours (51% longer). Video Playback: Ryzen™ 7 2700U: 6.9 hours vs. Ryzen™ 7 3700U: 10 hours (40% longer). Ryzen™ 7 2700U Test System: Lenovo IdeaPad 530s, Ryzen™ 7 2700U, 2x4GB DDR4-2400, Radeon™ Vega10 Graphics (driver 23.20.768.0), 1920x1080 AUO 403D 13.9” panel, 512GB Toshiba KBG30ZMT512G SSD, 45Whr battery, 150 nits brightness, Windows® 10 x64 RS4. Ryzen™ 7 3700U Test System: AMD Reference Motherboard, AMD Ryzen™ 7 3700U, 2x4GB DDR4-2400, Radeon™ Vega10 Graphics (driver 23.20.768.0), AUO B140HAN05.4 14” panel, 256GB WD Black WD256G1XOC SSD, 50Whr battery, 150 nits brightness, Windows® 10 x64 RS5. Results may vary with drivers and configuration. RVM-164
5. According to IBM research, for details refer to: https://www.ibm.com/security/data-breach
6. For general business laptops and desktops the AMD Transparent Secure Memory Encryption feature is included in AMD Ryzen PRO and Athlon PRO processors. PP-3

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dan_bounds
Staff
Staff

While numerous HPC workloads benefit from the core performance and industry leading memory bandwidth of the AMD EPYC™ 7000 series process family there’s a set of workloads that only scale when they get access to one thing, speed.

In industries using processes like Electronic Design Automation (EDA), where designers are constantly testing and validating designs, workloads only scale to a limited number of threads. This is when single core clock frequency becomes a critical factor. The faster the core runs, the more work that can be done in a defined amount of time.

After we launched the AMD EPYC 7000 series processor, we started getting the questions from customers running EDA workloads saying, “We need a high-frequency EPYC processor, when will you have it?” They loved the core density, the memory bandwidth and the I/O capacity that EPYC provides, but for their workloads, they simply needed more speed.

In November we showed those customers that we were listening and introduced the brand new EPYC 7371 processor, a new high-frequency product in the EPYC 7000 series family. Providing 16 cores at 3.6Ghz all core boost and a 3.8Ghz max boost for eight cores, the AMD EPYC 7371 is a perfect processor for workloads like EDA and high-performance computing that need access to higher frequency speeds. For AMD, the EPYC 7371 is particularly important as we race towards time to market with our next generation 7nm parts in the CPU and GPU space. You can read more here about how the EPYC 7371 helped us do that with the recently announced 7nm, Radeon™ VII products.

And now the first AMD EPYC 7371 systems are available, providing the high-frequency core performance that EDA and similar workloads need. There are numerous OEMs that are supporting the EPYC 7371 processor in their platforms.

For HPE customers, it is available in the fantastic HPE ProLiant DL385 Gen 10 server, which is purpose built to address to address HPC workloads of all kinds. Supermicro is supporting the EPYC 7371 across their entire AMD portfolio, including the BigTwin and Ultra lines that are popular among HPC and enterprise customers. We expect additional OEMs like ASUS, Gigabyte and Tyan to announce their support for the EPYC 7371 in the coming months.

Beyond high-frequency speeds for EDA workloads, the 7371 gives customers using software with a core-based licensing structure like ANSYS Fluent a benefit. Having a lower core count and a higher frequency processor allows them to get the best performance for their application, while optimizing their licensing costs without having to sacrifice memory and I/O.

No matter if you are running EDA, HPC, or any other workloads that need access to high-frequency cores combined with incredible memory bandwidth and expansive I/O capabilities, the AMD EPYC 7371 is the right choice, providing the performance and price needed to get work done, with speed and cost, efficiently.  

Daniel Bounds is the senior director of product management of the AMD Datacenter Solutions Group. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

NAP-42 – AMD EPYC™ 7601 processor supports up to 8 channels of DDR4-2667, versus the Xeon Platinum 8180 processor at 6 channels of DDR4-2667

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Today, I had the pleasure to address attendees at the 2019 Rice Oil & Gas HPC conference and discuss AMD’s vision for the HPC community and how the required compute power can continue to grow.

With 5.6 million barrels of oil expected to be pumped every day this year, Texas ranks only behind Russia and Saudi Arabia in production. One driver for all that output is technology, including high-performance computing to model oil resources and guide drilling. HPC system architecture has evolved dramatically over the past two decades, from monolithic supercomputers to clusters of industry standard servers to heterogenous nodes incorporating CPUs and accelerators such as GPUs. These new architectures have provided an incredible increase in performance and enabled new application areas beyond traditional HPC, most notably Big Data Analytics, Machine Learning, and Artificial Intelligence (AI).

The problem is the traditional levers used to increase the performance are becoming less effective. A more scalable, powerful, and secure approach is required to meet the ever-growing demands. Pushing the envelope of computing is the bread and butter of AMD, and there are a few key areas where we see innovation making a significant near-term contribution to HPC.

Chiplets

Chiplet design is an example of an area where the industry is moving to continue delivering performance gains even though the pace of Moore’s Law is slowing. Chiplets enable more silicon to be cost effectively used allowing companies, like AMD, to efficiently match processor IP to the best manufacturing process. AMD introduced the chiplet approach in 2017 with AMD EPYC server processors featuring the “Zen” architecture. We are taking it to the next level mid-year with our next generation 7nm, 64-core EPYC processor (codenamed “Rome”) featuring our “Zen 2” core. We demonstrated Rome in a single socket configuration running a popular NAMD benchmark outperforming the 2P Xeon 8180 powered server by an average of up to 15 percent1. (See video of demo here)

Next Generation I/O and Fabrics

The AMD “Zen 2” core is an amazing piece of technology that evolves the already legendary “Zen” design, driving the performance of AMD processors to new heights. But for HPC workloads, you must “feed the beast”, through connections to peripherals, networks, storage and memory. Rome is the first x86 server CPU to support PCIe® Gen 4.0 which doubles the performance of each I/O connection and thus boosts performance. We also joined early in supporting new, open standards for coherent fabrics including CCIX and Gen-Z that have tremendous potential.

Heterogenous Processing

The oil and gas industries were some of the first to see the potential for using different processing architectures for different workloads to maximize performance. Combining serial processing CPUs, like AMD EPYC, with high-performance, parallel GPUs, including AMD Radeon Instinct™, is the new normal for the highest performance HPC systems. Other accelerators, like FPGAs, are another exciting option for specialized workloads. And let’s not forget about software. The key to unlocking this potential is software, and open ecosystems like the one AMD established with ROCm are critical. Expect to hear a lot this year about the continued evolution of heterogeneous computing as the industry rallies around open solutions rather than closed, single vendor options.

I look forward to sharing more perspectives in the year ahead around how AMD views the future of HPC and the datacenter.

  1. Based on AMD internal testing of the NAMD Apo1 v2.12 benchmark. AMD tests conducted on AMD reference platform configured with 1 x preproduction EPYC 7nm 64 core SoC, 8 x 32GB DDR4 2666MHz DIMMs, and Ubuntu 18.04, 4.17 kernel and using the AOCC 1.3 beta compiler with OpenMPI 4.0, FFTW 3.3.8 and Charms 6.7.1, achieved an average of 9.83 ns/day; versus Supermicro SYS-1029U-TRTP configured with 2 x Intel Xeon Platinum 8180 CPUs, 12 x 32GB DDR4 2666MHz DIMMs and Ubuntu 18.04 , kernel 4.15 using the ICC 18.0.2 complier with FFTW 3.3.8 and Charms 6.8.2, achieved an average of 8.4 ns/day.ROM-01

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The telecommunications world is starting its annual pilgrimage to Barcelona for Mobile World Congress. At the show, you can imagine that we’ll once again hear about the latest and greatest smartphones, the progress being made by operators around the world to bring consumers high-speed 5G networks and other buzzwords dominating the mobile and telecoms world.

But a new story will arrive at this year’s show, and it will be…well, EPYC.

The AMD EPYC™ processor has won over customers in numerous industries like public cloud providers AWS and Microsoft Azure, high-performance computing centers and enterprise IT customers, but one of the more unique opportunities and storylines for the EPYC brand is in telecoms.

Not only is the AMD EPYC™ 7000 series a fantastic processor for telecoms companies building out datacenters to handle the exponential growth occurring in mobile traffic; the AMD EPYC™ Embedded 3000 processor is a fantastic embedded system on a chip that takes a lot of the features of the AMD EPYC 7000 and puts it into an embedded form factor.

MWC Chart.JPG

Potential telecoms applications for AMD processors

High Performance, Embedded Computing for Telecoms

Featuring up to 16 cores, up to 1TB of memory support, up to eight 10GbE ethernet ports, integrated security features, and up to 64 lanes of PCIe®, the AMD EPYC Embedded 3000 is a perfect embedded processor for things like edge devices, networking boxes housed in remote buildings, security appliances, 5G equipment and more.

IEI and Ibase are two companies that have launched network appliances for telecoms operators around the world using the AMD EPYC Embedded 3000 processor.  

The IEI PUZZLE series uses the AMD EPYC Embedded 3000 processor’s high core count and expansive I/O to handle proprietary network and Universal Customer Premise Equipment and offer real-time software-defined wide-area network services with any additional virtual network functions services.

The Ibase FWA8800 is the world’s first network appliance based on the AMD EPYC Embedded 3000 Series processors. The FWA8800 is optimized for throughput performance and high-density deployments in applications such as network security, VPN/SDN/NFV/SD-WAN, and more. It also provides network vendors a great processor, a flexible system configuration and reliable system operation.

Expanding the EPYC 7000 Ecosystem

We’re also seeing our major server partners take advantage of the AMD EPYC 7000 series for telecoms applications. Whether a telecoms operator is looking to build a 5G network, or future-ready their existing infrastructure with network functions virtualization, the AMD EPYC 7000 series processor with the HPE ProLiant DL325 Gen10 or the HPE ProLiant DL385 Gen10 is a great solution for the future of telecoms.

As well, for those environmental moments or natural disasters when a network has to continue functioning, HPE has certified both the DL325 and DL385 for NEBS level 3. This means an HPE DL325 or DL385 with an AMD EPYC processor is not only going to provide telecoms operators high core counts, incredible memory bandwidth and PCIe capabilities, but it’s certified to the highest standards to work in a common set of safety, spatial and environmental guidelines.

Telecommunications services are critical to today’s connected world, and anything that keeps services up and running, no matter the location or environmental factors, is essential. With NEBS level 3 certified servers, AMD EPYC and HPE are working to make this a reality.

Helping keep things Secure

As with any industry, security is a critical requirement for telecoms, and the AMD EPYC family provides a true leap forward in security features for processors. With a dedicated security processor built into the EPYC SoC architecture, customers can minimize potential attack surfaces and help protect software and data as it is booted, as it runs, and as it moves from server to server.

We’re excited for the show and the chance to talk to telecoms operators about the benefits of AMD EPYC whether in a server or in an embedded application. If you’re interested in learning more, come by meeting room 2D10MR at the show for a deeper dive into our innovative technologies and solution demos.  

Olivier Suinat is the CVP of sales for commercial and datacenter at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

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We have talked a lot about the value proposition for EPYC™ processors in virtualized environments, including a potential TCO savings of up to 45% in scenarios where AMD estimates competitive dual-socket system costs against the costs of a single EPYC processor-based system. The scalability AMD EPYC delivers to containerized applications and services using the Docker platform has received less attention.

Containers are a natural evolution of virtualization when it comes to increasing server efficiency even further. Separating the OS from the application removes the requirement to run a copy of the entire OS with each application on  a virtualized machine, allowing many more applications to run on a single VM . Containers allow developers to package up an application and its parts, such as libraries and other dependencies, and deliver it as a single package.

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With the Docker platform, businesses have been able to modernize monolithic or traditional applications and transition them to a container-based solution.  Most business applications consist of several components organized into a stack: web server, database, and in-memory cache.  Containers make it possible to compose each component into separate functional units or packages that can be maintained, scaled and updated independently.  The Docker platform is a key technology for enabling this type of application design, often called a microservice model where each such functional component is a microservice.

 

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AMD EPYC provides increased core density and flexibility to scale Docker-based microservices and applications up or down to meet spikes in demand or conserve system resources.  CPU response time increases linearly when all cores become saturated and the number of concurrently running containers continue to ramp up.  For CPU-intensive workloads,  EPYC capabilities enable system administrators to calculate how much CPU to over-provision depending on their applications Service Level Agreements (SLAs).

The Docker platform is available as both an open-source platform and enterprise-ready container platform for packaging, distributing, and managing applications within containers.

To learn more about the scalable performance of AMD EPYC in a Docker environment, please see three in-depth examples here.

Raghu Nambiar is the CVP & CTO of Datacenter Ecosystems & Application Engineering at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

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scott_aylor
Staff
Staff

Performance. Optimization. Security. These are the building blocks for the AMD EPYC™ processor and what every customer can expect when they use AMD EPYC. Whether in an enterprise datacenter, a high-performance computing cluster, or a public cloud instance, our goal is to provide a processor that can support the varied workloads across the modern IT environment.

In the public cloud market, we’ve heard loud and clear that customers want to deliver our exceptional core counts, memory bandwidth and I/O capabilities to expand their offerings.

Today, I am excited to share that after being in preview with a select group of customers, the Microsoft Azure Lsv2-series Virtual Machine powered by the AMD EPYC processor is now available to all. This milestone is another proof point that public cloud providers trust AMD to provide a high-performance, cost effective cloud instance to their customers.

The Lsv2-series offers customers a fantastic solution for anybody that’s looking to move big data applications, SQL and NoSQL databases, data warehousing, and large transactional databases into the cloud. It takes advantage of AMD EPYC’s expansive I/O capability and enables NVMe based storage performance on top of the inherent advantages of running in Azure’s cloud. It’s a win-win scenario. And for customers managing the Microsoft SQL server 2008 EOS, migrating to the Lsv2-series is a perfect option.

Navneet Joneja - Partner PM Manager, Microsoft Azure Compute and Messaging said it best, 

We’re thrilled to make generally available the new Lsv2 virtual machines featuring the AMD EPYC processor. They are designed to support a broad range of demanding workloads for our Azure customers, including in memory databases, big data, data warehousing and other enterprise class applications. We look forward to bringing to market new Azure virtual machines in collaboration with AMD, such as the HB-series currently in public preview.

You can read more about the Microsoft Azure Lsv2-series instance, including pricing, in the Microsoft blog here, and we believe you will find a lot to like with the offering. Signing up and picking an AMD powered instance is straightforward, as is moving from our competition to access AMD EPYC economics and performance.

In addition to the Lsv2-series instance, AMD EPYC is also powering the new Microsoft Azure HB-series VMs optimized for high-performance computing applications that need access to memory bandwidth. These are perfect for workloads that can leverage the more than 260 GB/sec of memory bandwidth that the AMD EPYC solution provides. You can try out an instance here, with a simple sign-up.

We’re excited to get AMD EPYC cloud instances in the hands of more customers, and we’re excited to continue to work with our amazing cloud partners like Microsoft Azure.

This is just the beginning for AMD EPYC processors in 2019. We will continue to set an even higher bar for performance, cost savings, and flexibility of choice as we bring our next generation products to market later this year.

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Scott Aylor is the CVP & GM of  the AMD Datacenter Solutions Group. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

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dtjong
Staff
Staff

Accelerated Learning, Creation and Consumption for Students and Teachers

Inspire students and teachers with incredible visuals for the interactive classroom. Chromebooks™ powered by AMD A-series processors offer students the quick performance and responsive experience needed to accelerate learning at K-12 educational environments. AMD A4-9120C and A6-9220C processors with built-in premium Radeon™ Graphics, provide students the performance to create video, audio and 3D model designs. Or consume highly visual content like videos or interactive online content easily while in the classroom, at home or on the go.

Simple and Easy to Use Chrome OS

Fast system boot-up and quick login with single sign-on, identity model with Chrome OS powered by AMD A-series processors. And customize learning with built in accessibility settings sync across any Chrome OS device, so as students switch between shared devices or log in at home with their G Suite for Education account, their accessibility settings automatically update.

Chromebooks™ Powered by AMD A-series processors

From educational web apps, G Suite for Education productivity tools, to web browsing – These new Chromebooks™ powered by advanced and efficient AMD A-series processors unlock premium processor performance for a fast and responsive Chrome OS experience.

HP Chromebook™ 11A G6 EE

Thin and rugged 11.6” Chromebook™ powered by AMD A4-9120C processors

Chromebook_HP11A-1.jpgChromebook_HP11A-2.jpg

Acer Chromebook™ 311

Impact-resistant body to stand up to daily wear and tear powered by AMD A4-9120C processors

Chromebook_Acer_311-1.jpgChromebook_Acer_311-2.jpg

Acer Chromebook™ Spin 311

Versatile Chromebook™ that can be used in clam shell, tablet, display and tent mode powered by AMD A4-9120C processors

Chromebook_Acer_Spin311-1.jpgChromebook_Acer_Spin311-2.jpg

David Tjong, Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

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dtjong
Staff
Staff

Accelerated Learning, Creation and Consumption for Students and Teachers

Inspire students and teachers with incredible visuals for the interactive classroom. Windows devices powered by AMD A-series processors offer students the quick performance and responsive experience needed to accelerate learning at K-12 educational environments. AMD A4-9120C and A6-9220C processors with built-in premium Radeon™ Graphics, provide students the performance to create video, audio and 3D model designs. Or consume highly visual content like videos or interactive online content easily while in the classroom, at home or on the go.

Notebooks Powered by AMD A-series processors

From everyday note-taking using Microsoft Office 365 to group collaboration using Microsoft Teams and Skype – These new AMD powered notebooks with Windows 10 are engineered to provide students and teachers premium processor performance for a fast and responsive Microsoft Office 365 experience, powerful multi-core performance to handle programming in Visual Studios and Radeon™ graphics to accelerate creative designs in Paint3D.

Acer Travelmate B1

Tough and sturdy 14” notebook powered by AMD A6-9220C processors

Windows_AcerB1-2.jpgWindows_AcerB1-1.jpg

Lenovo 14w

Thin and light 14” notebook, at just 17mm thin and weighing 3.3 pounds (1.5kg) powered by AMD A6-9220C processors*

Windows_Lenovo-14w.jpg

David Tjong, Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

*AMD has not independently verified this information.

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scott_aylor
Staff
Staff

What a year for the AMD and HPE teams! Only six months ago, I blogged about the AMD EPYC™ team heading to HPE Discover in Las Vegas and now we’re finishing up with HPE Discover in Madrid. It’s been a fantastic year for both companies with much more to come.

Before Las Vegas, we announced the HPE ProLiant DL325 Gen10 no compromise, single-socket server. This powerhouse platform from HPE is designed to tackle dense virtualization and software-defined storage workloads. With up to 32 cores, two terabytes of memory and 40 terabytes of NVMe storage in a 1U chassis, the DL325 is a fantastic machine for highly virtualized, on-premise workloads. The HPE ProLiant DL325 Gen10 delivers up to 27 percent lower cost per virtual machine (VM) than the leading dual-processor competitor for virtualization for those workloads[1].

Beyond the enterprise, we’ve seen some great wins for AMD and HPE in the high performance computing space, where AMD EPYC processors provide the necessary memory bandwidth and I/O lanes for memory intense workloads. At ISC in June 2018, HPE launched the new Apollo 35, a high density AMD EPYC™ compute solution that is ideal for memory bandwidth or capacity bound HPC workloads, such as computational fluid dynamics, weather simulation, and oil and gas exploration.

At SC18 in Dallas, HPE and AMD announced support for a new supercomputer from the High Performance Computing Center in Stuttgart, Germany. It will be the world’s fastest supercomputer for industrial production, powering computational engineering and research across science and industrial fields to advance applications in energy, climate, mobility, and health. Called Hawk, the supercomputer will be based on HPE’s next-generation high-performance computing platform running a next generation AMD EPYC™ processor code named “Rome.”

It's been a fantastic year for AMD and HPE. If you’re at HPE Discover Madrid, this is where you can find myself and the team on the show floor:

  • Stop by our booth, #230, to meet AMD experts and to see demos of AMD EPYC processors and HPE servers for virtualization, software-defined storage and more.

  • Tuesday, November 27 from 9:00 – 9:30 AM CET: HPE Live Interview with myself and Tom Lattin, VP, HPE ProLiant and Cloudline Systems.

  • Tuesday, November 27 from 10:00 – 10:30 AM CET at Theater 6: Olivier Suinat, CVP Sales, AMD Datacenter Solutions Group, will be on a panel discussing Cloud 28+ and AMD’s participation in it.

  • Wednesday, November 28 from 11:00 AM – 12:00 PM CET at N116, NCC Level 1: Tom Lattin, VP, HPE ProLiant and Cloudline Systems, will join me in a breakout session where we will talk about how HPE servers with AMD EPYC processors can redefine virtualization, software-defined storage and high-performance computing.

  • Wednesday, November 28 from 2:00 – 3:00 PM CET at N118, NCC Level 1: Isidro Gonzalez, senior GPU market development manager, AMD, will discuss AMD GPUs in an HPE GPU-enabled data center.

[1] Based on a comparison of the SPECvirt_sc2013 results of the ThinkSystem SR650 with 2 Intel Xeon Platinum 8164 processors versus the HPE ProLiant DL325 Gen10 with 1 AMD EPYC 7551P. SPEC and the benchmark name SPECvirt_2013 are registered trademarks of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). The stated results are published as of 06-05-18; see spec.org. Lenovo pricing from Lenovo site as of 05-14-18. HPE pricing is internal as of 06-05-18. Based on HPE testing, not independently verified by AMD.

The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and is subject to change without notice. Timelines, roadmaps, and/or product release dates shown in these slides are plans only and subject to change. “Rome is a code name for AMD architecture, and is not a product name. GD-122

Scott Aylor is the CVP & GM of  the AMD Datacenter Solutions Group. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

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High-performance computing (HPC) has grown to a point where it is a critical component of new technology advancements in academia and a wide array of industries in both the public and private sectors. Scientific research, public health, climate modeling, as well as oil and gas exploration are just a few examples where HPC is the driving force behind new innovations and knowledge discovery.

Utilizing the x86-architecture, the AMD EPYC™ processor, brings together high core counts, large memory capacity, extreme memory bandwidth and massive I/O with the right ratios to enable exceptional HPC workload performance.

AMD is committed to creating a broad partner ecosystem with collaborative engineering to provide tested and validated solutions that are tuned for specific workloads. As a result, AMD EPYC processors are now certified with software vendors providing some of the most popular HPC solutions. Examples include: computational fluid dynamics (CFD), crash simulation, and finite element analysis (FEA).

For computational fluid dynamics (CFD), AMD partnered with ANSYS® to take advantage of the AMD EPYC processor’s ample memory bandwidth to enable exceptional performance with their Fluent® software. ANSYS Fluent is used by the automotive, aerospace, consumer goods, energy, and healthcare industries for modeling flow, turbulence, heat transfer, and reactions in applications ranging from air flow over an aircraft wing to combustion in a furnace.

Altair Radioss is a leading structural analysis solver for non-linear problems under dynamic loadings, like automotive crash analysis, drop and impact analysis, terminal ballistics, blast and explosion effects, and high velocity impacts. AMD collaborated with Altair to create an optimized solution for Altair’s PBS Professional, a fast, powerful workload manager designed for HPC clusters, clouds and supercomputers. PBS Professional maximizes the utilization of an AMD EPYC processor cluster and increases the job throughput of Radioss.

OpenFOAM®, is free, open source computational fluid dynamics software. OpenFOAM is used across numerous engineering and science organizations, most notably in automotive, energy and aerospace. It’s designed to solve a wide range of problems, from complex fluid flows involving chemical reactions, turbulence and heat transfer, to acoustics, solid mechanics and electromagnetics. OpenFOAM takes advantage of the AMD EPYC processor’s ample memory bandwidth and large memory capacit....

For finite element analysis (FEA), AMD collaborated with LSTC. LS-DYNA® is a general-purpose multi-physics, finite element analysis program capable of simulating complex real-world problems. Widely used by the automotive industry to analyze vehicle designs, LS-DYNA® can accurately predict a car's behavior in a collision and the effects of the collision upon the car's occupants. These workloads are complex requiring a balance between floating point performance, memory bandwidth and network bandwidth. AMD EPYC processor’s eight lanes of memory bandwidth enable the system to more efficiently use the c.... With LS-DYNA® and AMD EPYC processors, automotive companies and their suppliers can test car designs without having to tool or experimentally test a prototype, thus saving time and expense.

In addition, AMD is investing heavily in high-performance computing for weather related codes. WRF, IFS and HYCOM are all sophisticated applications used in research and operational forecasting. All require a balance of computational power, large volume data ingestion and memory bandwidth. Initial testing of AMD EPYC processor-based systems by the HPC and AI Innovation Lab showed impressive results on memory bandwidth and core density per socket making AMD EPYC processor-based servers a good choice for many applications. AMD is continuing to collaborate with the community to optimize the entire stack for all weather-related codes.

AMD is committed to continually expanding our partner ecosystem to create jointly engineered, optimized solutions for our customers that lower implementation risk and improve total cost of ownership.

Raghu Nambiar is the CVP & CTO of Datacenter Ecosystems & Application Engineering at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

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jerrygadbois
Staff
Staff

Previously, I covered the arrival of the AMD EPYC processor era in the channel and the commencement of a revolutionary journey in the datacenter. Today I’m pleased to give an update and highlight a few of the key areas of advancement in the AMD EPYC channel journey.

The Time is NOW for an On-Premise Virtualization Refresh!

AMD is gaining momentum by offering our partners more options to solve their customers’ problems and driving a refresh of their aging virtualized on-premise server platforms.

According to IDC1, the average two-socket server is now more than 5 years old, bringing lower performance, more overhead in maintenance costs, and increased downtime of an outdated datacenter. These servers can also be more susceptible to security vulnerabilities with potential costly mitigation. IDC further states that 6 out of 10, two-socket servers in the industry are due for an upgrade in the next 12 months, and this is an immense opportunity for a modern EPYC solution.

Many of these refresh opportunities will encompass older, 8-10 core dual-socket products which now can easily be replaced with a single-socket, EPYC 16-32 core processor at a similar price point. This is the game changer that should make a CIO with an aging and expensive two-socket system consider an upgrade. For example, a Dell PowerEdge 7415, is a vSAN ready node that can reduce your TCO by up to 20% and cut your licensing costs in half2.

In a VMware virtualized environment, a move to AMD EPYC processors can reduce total server count and reduce TCO over three years by up to 45% with up to 2.8 times greater VM density3 supported with industry leading 2 TB’s of memory per socket4.

And our Commercial Channel Partners are Listening …

AMD has worked closely with our OEM and Channel Partners globally to help drive EPYC solutions in the Commercial Channel. To further entice our partners to continue the momentum as they engage in the refresh opportunity, AMD has introduced the EARN EPYC™ Rewards incentive program for select HPE ProLiant servers. Initially, it will be implemented in North America and Europe with plans to expand to Greater China and across Asia. EARN EPYC™ Rewards provides incentives to our Distributor and Value-Added Reseller (VAR) partners selling select HPE ProLiant DL325 and DL385 servers to help maximize marketing and sales activities. We are focused on solving the customers’ need to refresh their virtualized servers and our partners are fully on-board!

Giles Norris, vendor relations and marketing manager at Bechtle Direct Ltd., says it best “The Earn EPYC Rewards program gives us a unique opportunity to simultaneously boost our margins, save our customers money, and recommend a best-fit solution. We’re very pleased to be part of the program.”

Stay tuned for more information as we introduce Dell EMC PowerEdge and other partner platforms into similar incentive programs.

If you want more information on the Global EARN EPYC™ Rewards Program, click here. 

EPYC System Integrator Partner Program reaching around the world

In the Component channel over 40 System Integrators in North America and Europe have enrolled into our inaugural System Integrator Partner Program and are enjoying benefits such as earning incentives for deploying EPYC processor solutions.

Peter Chen, President of Elite partner Exxact Corporation, says, “Our valued partnership with AMD and the AMD EPYC Partner Program has enabled Exxact to provide a new portfolio of innovative and scalable HPC platforms that are equipped for industry-leading performance.”

And, as EPYC continues to make its mark globally, we are expanding our channel program with System Integrator partners in South Korea and China! Stay tuned for more!

If you want more information on the Global EPYC System Integrator Partner Program, click here

Educating, enabling, & promoting the revolutionary benefits of EPYC across the channel

Continuing our dedication to supporting AMD’s valued channel partners, we have released two value proposition tools to partners and are evangelizing the undeniable value of an EPYC single- and dual-socket solutions.

The Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) tool compares a complete EPYC processor solution to a competitor for a given workload, including server, socket, core and memory. The comprehensive analysis also includes power & cooling, space, and IT administration costs and can be easily emailed & shared in presentations. Click here for AMD's EPYC TCO Tool!

The new CPU Selector Tool offers a price, core and SPECrate CPU-to-CPU comparison suggesting the optimum AMD EPYC processor versus an equivalent competitor product. This includes recommending AMD’s “No Compromise” single-socket options head to head vs competing dual-socket solutions.

If you happen to be at Canalys in Barcelona next month sign-up for my “Liberate your customers!” workshop to learn more about EPYC processors in the channel.

I hope you find these additions to the AMD Channel Program for datacenter products helpful. Please join us in bringing the sea-change that AMD EPYC offers to the world!

1Based on AMD Analysis of IDC Quarterly Server Tracker historical shipments and revenue of 2 Socket Systems applying an average server lifespan of 3.7 years assuming 60% of 2 socket servers are virtualized and 60% of those servers are on premise or not “public cloud based.”

2Up to 20% Lower TCO and Lower Licensing Costs: Demartek test report commissioned by Dell: Dell EMC PowerEdge R7415 AMD EPYC VMware vSAN Mixed Workloads Performance – April 2018 www.demartek.com/Demartek_Dell_EMC_PowerEdge_R7415_vSAN_Mixed_Workloads_Evaluation_2018-04.html

3 Compares 3-year total cost of ownership for 320 virtual machines of 1 virtual machine per core with 8GB of DRAM per core with similar performance. VM Density of 2.8X is calculated based on 320 VM’s via 14 2U rack mount servers (first configuration below) for a total of 320/28U versus the same 320 VM’s via 10 1U rack mount servers (second configuration below) for a total of 320/10U.

Configuration comparisons include

(14) PowerEdge R740 Configuration Chassis with up to 8 x 3.5" SAS/SATA Hard Drives for 2CPU Configuration, with (2) Intel® Xeon® Gold 5118 2.3G, 12C/24T, 10.4GT/s, 16.5M Cache, Turbo, HT (105W) DDR4-2400, Performance Optimized Memory Capacity of (12) 16GB RDIMM, 2666MT/s, Dual Rank Dimms, Hard Drives including (1) 120GB SSD SATA Boot 6Gbps 512n 2.5in Hot-plug Drive & (6) 480GB SSD SAS Mix Use 12Gbps 512n 2.5in Hot-plug Drives, No Operating System 3 Years Basic Hardware Warranty Repair: 5x10 HW-Only, 5x10 NBD Onsite Deployment Services, No Installation.  Configuration priced on 8/30/2018 at www.dell.com for $14,271 per server; $199,794 total Hardware Acquisition Cost.  Facilities and administration costs include $16,004 for power and cooling, $540 for space, and $42,880 for IT administration costs for a total of $59,424 over 3 years - calculated based on AMD EPYC™ TCO calculator at https://uatfast.valuestoryapp.com/AMD/sales. SW Licensing costs include (10) vSphere with Ops Manager Ent Plus, 2 CPU License,5Yrs ProSupport + Subscription for $12.163 each for a total SW licensing costs of $121,638.  Pricing obtained at www.dell.com on 8/30/18.  Total 3 yr. Cost of Ownership of $429,511.

10) PowerEdge R6415 Configuration Chassis with up to 8 x 3.5" SAS/SATA Hard Drives for 2CPU Configuration, with (1) AMD EPYC™ 7551P 2.00GHz/2.55GHz, 32C/64T, 64M Cache (180W) DDR4-2666, Performance Optimized Memory Capacity of (8) 32GB RDIMM, 2666MT/s, Dual Rank Dimms,  Hard Drives including (1) 120GB SSD SATA Boot 6Gbps 512n 2.5in Hot-plug Drive & (6) 400GB SSD SAS Mix Use 12Gbps 512n 2.5in Hot-plug Drives, No Operating System 3 Years Basic Hardware Warranty Repair: 5x10 HW-Only, 5x10 NBD Onsite Deployment Services, No Installation.  Configuration priced on 8/30/18 at www.dell.com for $13,585 per server; $135,850 total Hardware Acquisition Cost.  Facilities and administration costs include $5,438 for power and cooling, $540 for space, and $34,304 for IT administration costs for a total of $40,282 over 3 years - calculated based on AMD EPYC™ TCO calculator at https://uatfast.valuestoryapp.com/AMD/sales. SW Licensing costs include (10) vSphere with Ops Manager Ent Plus, 1 CPU License,5Yrs ProSupport + Subscription for $7,820 each for a total SW licensing costs of $60,810.  Pricing obtained at www.dell.com on 8/30/18.  Total 3yr Cost of Ownership of $236,942

4 A single AMD EPYC™ 7601 processor offers up to 2TB/processor (x 2 = 4TB), versus a single Xeon Platinum 8180 processor at 768Gb/processor (x 2 = 1.54TB).  NAP-44.

Jerry Gadbois is the World Wide Channel Market Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

©2018 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, EPYC, and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

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scott_aylor
Staff
Staff

This week at the Open Compute EU Summit in Amsterdam I had the pleasure of rolling out along with ZT Systems and Microsoft, a powerful new addition to the AMD EPYC processor ecosystem. A leading provider to hyperscale datacenters, ZT Systems delivers outstanding performance and value for GPU computing and Virtual Desktop Infrastructure (VDI) with their new expansion system built on AMD Radeon Instinct GPUs. The support of Microsoft and its Project Olympus platform is the underlying foundation that ties the solution together.

Scott Aylor_ZT Systems.jpg

Enterprises are quickly moving some or all visualization workloads to the cloud.  Be it classic workstation workloads delivering design and manufacturing applications for CAD/CAE or just plain old Windows 10. Being able to deliver high-end applications and Windows desktops from servers in the cloud lets modern business bemore efficient and nimbler, with greater control.

The XPO200 3U PCIe Expansion System is designed to deliver outstanding flexibility and scale-out GPU computing, as well as highly cost effective VDI solutions, via AMD Radeon Instinct MI25 GPUs and EPYC CPUs.

AMD’s GPUs for the cloud have been purpose-built to optimally virtualize and deliver these workloads.  Using a built-in virtualization engine, based on the PCI spec SR-IOV (Single Root IO Virtualization), the GPUs deliver persistent quality of service making it easier to deploy and manage.

With up to 32 cores and 64 threads, 8 memory channels with up to 2 TB of memory per socket, and 128 PCIe lanes, AMD EPYC CPU is designed  to deliver the connectivity, memory capacity and VM density for GPU accelerated workloads.

To learn more about the XPO200 3U PCIe Expansion System as an attractive option for an array of modern datacenter applications please visit www.ztsystems.com/ocp.

The information contained in this blog represents the view of AMD or the third-party presenter as of the date presented. AMD and/or the third-party presenters have no obligation to update any forward-looking content in the above presentations. AMD is not responsible for the content of any third-party presentations and does not necessarily endorse the comments made therein. GD-84

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-97

©2018 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, EPYC, Radeon, and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.​

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dan_bounds
Staff
Staff

The complexity of the technology and the pace of innovation in the datacenter can be dizzying for anyone working in the space. What really excites me about AMD EPYC™ processors is that the tangible benefits of our products are part of that story. It is our unique feature set that creates an opportunity to drive exceptional performance and low TCO for our customers. At its core, there are three pillars to the EPYC proposition, each comprised of both engineering and economic considerations. First, a refresh is needed for a true datacenter transformation to occur. Second, speed is everything when it comes to data analytics and, thirdly, you don’t have to sacrifice performance for costs in the cloud. I took a shot at distilling this down in more detail below.

Refresh Needed for Datacenter Transformation

No question that the move to off-premise mega-datacenters to support entire IT operations for large enterprises is one of the most significant transformations in business (more on that below.) However, the company owned datacenter is still alive and well. There are processing needs and applications that an enterprise may want to keep close to home and under their own management. That doesn’t mean the on-premise infrastructure should stay locked into the past. The AMD EPYC single-socket platform is the game changer that should make a CIO saddled with an aging, underutilized and expensive two-socket system sit up and take notice. Disconnect those old SANS, move to a hyperconverged infrastructure and add secure encryption to your VMs. For example, a Dell PowerEdge 7415, is a VSAN ready node that can reduce your TCO 20% and cut your licensing costs in half1. Let AMD EPYC processors make you the hero with that next infrastructure upgrade.

Big Data Needs to be Fast

We have all been at the keynote or analyst seminar where the “growth in generated data” chart is the first slide (not surprisingly, it goes up and to the right). Our technology creates it and our technology must manage it, too. Having data isn’t an advantage anymore. Rather, analyzing it quickly and better than someone else is how you get ahead. Accelerating innovation and unlocking the next discovery cannot be memory bound by your processors’ limitations. AMD EPYC processors free high-performance computing from those constraints. And, paired with our AMD Radeon GPU products, we can apply the right architecture to the problem at hand, be it in inference or deep learning for machine intelligence. Notre Dame and The National Institute of Nuclear Physics in Italy are doing more with AMD EPYC processors, and so can you.

Redefining the Economics and Security of Cloud Services

The only reason cloud-based services exist is to deliver at scale a less costly alternative to owning and maintaining your own datacenter. IT customers buy capacity at a certain cost point – either on premise or off premise – it’s that simple. AMD EPYC processors are disrupting the incumbent in this market by being able to deliver more service at the same cost point, or equivalent service more affordably1. Tencent, Microsoft Azure, Baidu, Dropbox and more have picked AMD EPYC processors to support their offerings for the unique set of features and value AMD delivers. And in a world where data security seems to make the headlines every week, AMD EPYC can help deliver secure encryption to virtualized machines across more threads and more cores. You don’t have to choose between losing performance by shutting off hyperthreading or risking data loss between VMs.

By providing the right balance of compute, memory, I/O and security for high density environments AMD EPYC is a winning formula. It is changing the dynamics of the datacenter today and it deserves a closer look. The momentum we are seeing across our customers proves these points and we are just getting started. With a strong roadmap in place, I encourage you to begin your journey toward the future with AMD today.

Daniel Bounds, senior director, Datacenter Products for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

120% Lower TCO and 50% Lower Licensing Costs: Demartek test report: Dell EMC PowerEdge R7415 AMD EPYC VMware vSAN Mixed Workloads Performance – April 2018 www.demartek.com/Demartek_Dell_EMC_PowerEdge_R7415_vSAN_Mixed_Workloads_Evaluation_2018-04.html

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As the world of console, PC and handheld gaming evolves with higher resolution displays, more intense rendering and more vibrant colors, the casino gaming market is following suit. The new normal for a typical casino or slot machine game is multiple, high resolution (up to 4K) screens displaying intricate, 3D graphics that show players their standings amongst others, highlight video content, display engaging ads, and more.

This is what the market is demanding. A truly visually engaging experience that helps casinos around the world compete with the likes of console, online, and handheld games.

In February 2018, we announced the Ryzen™ Embedded V1000 processor family, which brings together breakthrough performance of the pioneering AMD “Zen” CPU and “Vega” GPU architectures in a seamlessly integrated SOC solution. This provides the ability to deliver high end 3-D graphics on up to four, 4K, 60Mhz refresh displays. This is exactly what the casino gaming industry needs to enable a new higher levels of processing power for next-generation embedded designs, delivering superior graphics and multimedia processing, and compute performance.

Companies like Quixant, Advantech, iBase Gaming, Sapphire and Axiomtek have all signed on as Ryzen embedded V1000 customers, and will be showing off their systems at this year’s Global Gaming Expo in Las Vegas at the AMD Booth, number 3814.

AMD’s support of the casino gaming industry spans more than a decade. With Ryzen Embedded V1000 and portfolio of discrete graphics processors, a bright future for casinos by enabling engaging, theme-based entertainment presented on multiple large 4K displays, with vibrant 3D graphics. It’s what will keep patrons engaged and trying for the jackpot!

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john_morris
Staff
Staff

When AMD CEO Lisa Su told BARRON’S what it takes to be successful in the IT industry, she said: “What you need to be successful is, you need to execute, you need to have attractive markets, you need to have that product roadmap, and you need to keep up with the cycle.”

This is even more true when it comes to commercial client business, a very attractive market that you can win only by offering the right product but even more importantly by demonstrating the capability to respond to business users’ needs and optimizing customer’s ROI.

When we first launched our Ryzen PRO CPUs for the commercial market in the summer of 2017, we revitalized the commercial market. In May this year, we expanded our offering with our new Ryzen PRO processors powered by built-in Radeon™ Vega graphics.

In just 8 months we launched 20 new Ryzen processors– including seven of Ryzen PRO processors built for the modern commercial user. The Ryzen PRO 2700U, 2500U and 2300U for mobile, and the 2400G, 2400GE, 2200G and 2200GE for desktop, and we are not stopping there. Earlier this month we announced availability of three new desktop Ryzen PRO CPU models and the return of Athlon™ products to the commercial space. It’s our largest commercial portfolio ever, but even more notable is the broad offering of AMD-based commercial systems from industry top players like Dell, HP and Lenovo.

Unique needs, massive opportunity

The market for PC processors is estimated as being a $30 billion,1 one third of which is commercial.

So, our goal with Ryzen PRO was to unlock that $10 billion opportunity of the $30 billion market. And we are succeeding because we focused intensely on three areas of utmost importance to business users: Security, Reliability, and Performance. By delivering high-performing, premium PCs with excellent ROI and low TCO, focusing on the quality of the end-user’s experience for productivity and business-critical applications, we’re seeing unprecedented adoption in the commercial market.

Too many of today’s leading products end up being tomorrow’s paperweights. Not so with AMD Ryzen PRO processors, which include technology specifically designed for future demands, so our customers don’t have to worry about early obsolescence.

Industry recognition from the analyst community

It’s been particularly rewarding to witness the positive response, acknowledgment and recognition from respected technology industry analysts’ firms on our momentum in the commercial client space.

Canalys, a leading global technology market analyst firm with a distinct channel focus, said in one of its notes “Ryzen and EPYC have shined in the consumer and server spaces by hitting three critical targets: better than expected performance, greater core counts and lower pricing relative to Intel Core… there is a real possibility that AMD will surpass Intel in performance in 2019 with its third-generation Ryzen processors.”

As well as:

“Ryzen PRO processors are particularly competitive for mobile professionals who require GPU performance for industrial and graphic design workloads.”

And: “Security is paramount for many businesses, and across its lineup AMD can argue greater hardware security than Intel.”

Another market note from IDC, analyzing the Ryzen Pro APU launch, commented:

“By embedding GuardMI technology with the standout feature of Secure Boot Process which ensures BIOS level security from power-on to power-off, AMD addressed one of the crucial needs of current enterprise solutions - security.

And also, that:

“SenseMI technology, offering processor-level machine intelligence, and DASH (Desktop and Mobile Architecture for System Hardware) manageability are some of the additional features baked into the processor to boost performance and enhance controllability aspects most suitable for various business usages.”

Gartner has listed AMD Ryzen PRO based solutions in its July 2018 “Recommended Configurations for Notebooks and Desktop PCs, 2018” report in the Mainstream user, Price-Driven user, and Technology-driven user profiles categories. They are listing 8 AMD PR0 processors out of a total of 15 processors they recommend for both notebook and desktop solutions for different users’ scenarios.

We’re just getting started

At AMD, we’re working hard to develop business solutions for the challenges professional users face every day. We don’t create technology for technology’s sake – we’re focused on meaningful innovation that delivers real value, with real world productivity in mind. For enterprise customers who need flexible client PCs, we’re committed to providing a flexible, no-compromise experience, through AMD Ryzen PRO APUs with Radeon Vega Graphics.

As encouraging as our success is, with these new enterprise platforms from the likes of Dell, HP and Lenovo representing an important milestone for AMD - we’re really just getting started. In 2018 and beyond, we’ll strive to lead this space, and address the needs of the premium commercial market - from top-to-bottom.

John Morris, Sr. Director and General Manger Commercial Sales and Workstation Business at AMD

  1. AMD actuals and internal estimates.

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As companies ramp up IoT and Edge Compute endeavors, the AMD Embedded product portfolio is well positioned to help customers solve the challenges presented by the increasing complexity of today’s edge environment. The same qualities that the AMD EPYC™ 3000 and AMD Ryzen™ V1000 embedded processors apply to other vertical markets can translate into benefits for IoT solutions for edge gateways, servers and interconnected products.

We’ve had great conversations with customers and they are sharing their insights as they build out their IoT and Edge Compute system.

  1. Security: Making sure all devices on the network, no matter how far away from the data center, have security.
  2. Performance: Getting high performance at great cost to enable use cases such as data analytics and machine intelligence at the edge.
  3. Ease of use: Interoperability and flexibility to work across a variety of platforms and ecosystems

Luckily for our customers and potential customers, our Embedded processors provide a combination of elegant solutions to address these challenges and more.

Security

In the new IoT world, there is an explosion of connected products working at the edge of the network, which creates an increased security vulnerability. Embedded processors from AMD implement features that validate root of trust at the chip level while also fortifying the integrity of other platform facets. An on-chip security processor, in tandem with hardware-validated boot capabilities, helps protect data and helps ensure systems boot up based on trusted software. Security measures are bolstered even further with Secure Memory Encryption to help protect systems against unauthorized physical memory access and Secure Encrypted Virtualization for encrypting virtual machines in memory. These security capabilities are leveraged in IoT systems to deliver “stronger” edge to cloud security.

Performance

The AMD EPYC Embedded 3000 Series processors provide the performance and power efficiency to enable a variety of Edge computing platforms; bringing computation analytics and intelligence closer to the customer and even on premises with a compelling feature-set for such solutions. As an added benefit, with a common architecture between the AMD EPYC Embedded 3000 series and the EPYC 7000 SOC for data centers, customers can share common security and RAS features from the edge to the core allowing for seamless migration of functionality and compute tasks to where they are most efficient in the network.

The AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 processors provide an ideal balance of performance and power. High performance CPU cores coupled with integrated graphics enable bring more processing and decision making at the edge enabling a new level of service with lower latency and secure connectivity, ultimately helping to enable lower costs and enhanced data security.

Flexibility

AMD is a supporting member of EdgeX Foundry, a group of ecosystem partners with the common goal of improving IoT interoperability. Collaborating with more than 70 participating members towards a quality open environment and framework for building and accelerating IoT deployments. We are using EdgeX as one of our anchors in our IoT strategy and have developed more than a dozen close partnerships with members of EdgeX, including companies like Device Authority, DellEMC, ClearBlade and more, all developing IP in an open, easy and interoperable framework that accelerates IoT adoption.

Whatever the future brings for IoT and Edge Computing, AMD embedded products will be ready to support with performance, flexibility and security.

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After years of attending the Strata Data Conference, this is my first year at the show in my new role as Vice President and CTO of the Datacenter group for AMD. It’s also the first year for AMD’s new server processor, EPYC™, which only increases my excitement about the conference this week. The AMD EPYC processor is designed specifically for the modern datacenter with high core counts, access to large amounts of memory, ample memory bandwidth and massive I/O. All brought together with the right ratios to create an incredibly flexible workhorse able to meet the needs of a wide variety of workloads.

The big data revolution began with the ability to harness many computers in order to process large amounts of data (far larger than ever before). This was an innovative use of software that turned under-utilized smaller servers into a single data processing engine that unleashed the latent power of the data that is the beating heart of every business.

The next innovative leap provided the ability to process this huge volume of data in real-time. Advances in networking, storage and software technology enabled real-time streaming processing of huge volumes of data. We are now entering the next stage of innovation: real-time analysis. Analysis is what turns data into insight, and the combined efforts of the global community are making analysis of big data in real-time a reality. The AMD EPYC processors are perfectly matched to support the hardware underpinning all of the computation needed to support this effort.

We are proud to be part of a large and growing ecosystem of partners, many of them here at Strata New York: Hortonworks, MapR, DataStax and Couchbase to name just a few; all of whom are actively participating in this ongoing innovation. AMD’s most recent contribution is the EPYC SoC which employs a truly innovative design -  the “no compromise, single socket” system is now a viable choice to replace two-socket systems. This in turn drives down cost, improves energy usage and makes better use of space in the datacenter.

Business innovates with data. With AMD EPYC processors, that innovation extends all the  way down the stack into the processor itself. Stop by our booth (#954) at the conference to see some of the more than 50 server platforms that the AMD EPYC processor has been designed into, as well as information on our growing list of partnerships with independent software vendors.

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dtjong
Staff
Staff

What type of computer user would you consider yourself?

  • Are you an entry-level user that just needs their computer for basic word processing or web browsing?
  • Are you a mainstream user that will do all the above plus some light content creation, spreadsheet analysis or heavy multi-tasking?
  • Or are you a power-user that needs premium performance for software development, VR or 3D modeling?

Regardless of whichever type of user you identify with, you need a computing system that matches your performance requirements. With the launch of the AMD Athlon™ PRO and 2nd Gen Ryzen™ PRO processors, AMD offers a complete top to bottom stack of commercial-grade desktop processors designed for each of these types of users.

Slide1.JPG

Performance for Commercial Desktop User Workloads

The 2nd Gen Ryzen™ PRO desktop processors have been amped up from the 1st Gen Ryzen PRO CPUs, moving to the 12nm process and improved “zen+” architecture. The 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO processors also feature the latest Precision Boost 2 and XFR2 technology3 to allow these CPUs to reach even higher clock speeds than their predecessors. This ultimately means 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO CPUs are generationally faster and continue to provide leading multi-threaded performance versus the competition.1

Slide2.JPG

see footnote #1

Slide3.JPG

see footnote #1

The Athlon™ PRO 200GE desktop processor is designed to target entry-level users. This CPU combines the modern “Zen” core architecture with premium Radeon™ Vega graphics to provide the reliable and responsive performance entry-level users need for tasks from word processing, web browsing to video conferencing.2

Slide4.JPG

see footnote #2

Slide5.JPG

see footnote #2

Reliability, Manageability & Security for all user workloads

In enterprise environments, Security and Reliability is critical regardless of whether you’re an entry-level or power user. That’s why all AMD Ryzen™ PRO and Athlon™ PRO processors support the same reliability and manageability features (such as 18 month image stability and DASH manageability) and security features (such as Transparent secure memory encryption and Secure boot process) demanded by IT professionals.

Slide6.jpg

Desktop System from the leading OEMs

So where can you get a desktop system with these new processors? The 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO and Athlon PRO 200GE model will be available with the major global OEMs including Dell, HP and Lenovo systems, dependent on respective OEM launch schedules4, so you can choose the right solution you need regardless if you’re an entry-level, mainstream or power-user.

Slide7.JPG

David Tjong, Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

“Zen” and “Vega” are codenames only and not AMD product names.

1. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 8/24/2018 on the following system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used.

AMD 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO System Config:  AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X, 2700, Ryzen 5 PRO 2600 ‘Turpan’ reference motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system. AMD 1st Gen Ryzen PRO System Config: AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 1700X, 1700, Ryzen 5 PRO 1600 X370 Xpower Gaming Titanium motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system.

Multiprocessing performance represented by Cinebench R15 nT multiprocessing performance. System performance represented by PCMark10 extended. Each processor achieved the following scores:

AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X, 1720, 7607; AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700, 1577, 7472; AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2600, 1311, 7758; AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 1700X, 1557, 7290; AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 1700, 1355, 7123; AMD Ryzen 5 1600, 1153, 7143.

The Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X achieved a multiprocessing score of 1720 (1720/1557= up to 10% faster than the Ryzen 7 PRO 1700X).  The Ryzen 7 PRO 2700 achieved a multiprocessing score of 1577 (1577/1355=up to 16% faster than the Ryzen 7 PRO 1700).  The Ryzen 5 PRO 2600 achieved a multiprocessing score of 1311 (1311/1153= up to 14% faster than the Ryzen 5 PRO 1600).

The Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X achieved a system score of 7607 (7607/7290= up to 4% faster than the Ryzen 7 PRO 1700X).  The Ryzen 7 PRO 2700 achieved a system score of 7472 (7472/7123=up to 5% faster than the Ryzen 7 PRO 1700).  The Ryzen 5 PRO 2600 achieved a system score of 7756 (7756/7143= up to 9% faster than the Ryzen 5 PRO 1600).

RZP-31

Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 8/24/2018 on the following system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. AMD System Config:  AMD Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X, Ryzen 5 PRO 2600 ‘Turpan’ reference motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system. Intel System Config:  Intel Core i7-8700, i5-8600 Gigabyte Z370 AORUS Gaming5 motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 Graphics Card, Graphics driver 390.77, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 RS3 operating system.

Benchmarks used: Cinebench R15 nT (multiprocessing performance), PCMark10 Extended (system performance)

Each processor achieved the following scores:

Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X: 1720, 7607; Ryzen 5 PRO 2600: 1311, 7758; Core i7-8700: 1393, 8581; i5-8600: 1024, 7733.

(1720/1393=up to 24% faster multiprocessing performance on Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X vs the Core i7-8700), (7607/8581=up to 11% slower system performance on Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X vs the Core i7-8700)

(1311/1024=up to 28% faster multiprocessing performance on Ryzen 7 PRO 2600 vs the Core i5-8600), (7758/7733=0% or similar system performance on Ryzen 5 PRO 2600 vs. the Core i5-8600)

RZP-32

2. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 8/24/2018 on the following system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. AMD System Config:  AMD Athlon PRO 200GE MSI B450 Tomahawk motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-2666, Radeon Vega 3 Graphics, Graphics driver AMD Software version 18.7.1, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 Pro operating system. Intel System Config:  Intel Pentium G4560 MSI B250 Gaming M3 motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-2400, Intel HD Graphics 610, Graphics driver 24.20.100.6194, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 Pro operating system.

Benchmarks used: Cinebench R15 nT (multiprocessing performance), PCMark10 Extended (system performance), 3DMark11 Performance (graphics performance)

Each processor achieved the following scores:

Athlon PRO 200GE: 357, 2547, 2039; Pentium G4560: 368, 2143, 1222.

(357/368=up to 3% slower multiprocessing performance on Athlon PRO 200GE than the Pentium G4560), (2547/2143=up to 19% faster system performance on Athlon PRO 200GE than the Pentium G4560)

(2039/1222=up to 67% faster system performance on Athlon PRO 200GE than the Pentium G4560)

RZP-35

General office workloads represented with the AMD Office 2016 Productivity Script by AMD performance labs as of 8/24/2018.  PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. Athlon™ PRO 200GE vs.  Pentium G4560 Office Productivity Script Time to Complete: 148 vs. 149 seconds (0% faster or similar).

AMD System Config: AMD Athlon PRO 200GE MSI B450 Tomahawk motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-2666, Radeon Vega 3 Graphics, Graphics driver AMD Software version 18.7.1, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 Pro operating system. Intel System Config:  Intel Pentium G4560 MSI B250 Gaming M3 motherboard, 16GB of dual-channel DDR4-2400, Intel HD Graphics 610, Graphics driver 24.20.100.6194, and a Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD using the Windows 10 Pro operating system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used.

RZP-36

3. AMD SenseMI technology is built into all Ryzen processors, but specific features and their enablement may vary by product and platform. Learn more at http://www.amd.com/en/technologies/sense-mi. GD-126

4. THE 2ND GENERATION RYZEN PRO DESKTOP PROCESSORS AND ATHLON PRO 200GE MODEL WILL BE AVAILABLE WITH MAJOR GLOBAL OEMS INCLUDING DELL, HP, AND LENOVO SYSTEMS, DEPENDENT ON RESPECTIVE OEM LAUNCH SCHEDULES. A COMPLETE LIST OF PARTICIPATING RETAILERS AND LAUNCH INFORMATION CAN BE FOUND AT WWW.AMD.COM

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Over the last 30 years, industry standard bodies like the TPC and SPEC have developed many standards for performance benchmarking. The motivation behind these standards is to create technically rigorous, vendor-neutral methods of comparison. These standards have enabled buyers to make more informed decisions about their purchases and have given designers and engineers baselines to better understand their systems, ultimately driving innovation and the development of faster, less expensive, and more energy efficient systems.

Looking back, the most influential and widely adopted standards were the SPEC CPU Benchmark Suites at the system level, and at the application level, the TPC-C (industry standard for benchmarking transaction processing systems), and the TPC-D and its successor, TPC-H (industry standards for benchmarking decision support systems). These were the forerunners to hundreds of benchmark results, appearing in publications and research papers, and driving an ever-expanding list of innovations.

Time marches on and technology-driven innovation continues its relentless advance. Let’s take a closer look at benchmark standards from the TPC in recent years. The TPC has kept pace with the technology, developing and releasing appropriate benchmark standards such as the TPCx-HS and TPCx-BB (benchmark standard for Hadoop based big data analytics), TPCx-DS 2.0 (benchmark standard for decision support on relational and non-relational database systems), and the TPCx-IoT (benchmark standard for IoT gateway systems). In line with the increasing use of virtualization in both private and public clouds, the TPC developed a complete end-to-end virtualization benchmark, TPCx-V.

So, what is TPCx-V designed for? It measures the performance of a server running virtualized databases, and models many properties of virtualized servers including: multiple virtual machines (VMs) running at different load levels, online transaction processing workloads, and decision support system workloads. It uses databases of different sizes and load levels, and simulates large fluctuations in the load levels within virtual machines mirroring real-life load elasticity.

I am a big fan of talking about the industry’s best and first-ever. For those who follow the evolution of database technologies and industry standards, I want to highlight some historical data: the first TPC-C1 and TPC-D2 results were published by IBM; the first TPC-H3 was published by Sun; more recently, the first TPCx-HS4 and TPCx-IoT5 were published by Cisco.

Today, it is my great pleasure to jointly announce the industry’s first ever TPCx-V result. The result was produced using an AMD EPYC™ processor in a Dell EMC server running VMWare.

The benchmark configuration consists of one Dell EMC PowerEdge R7415 with one AMD EPYC 7551P processor (32 core/64 threads), 256 GB DDR4 RAM (2400 Mhz) running VMware ESXi 6.5.0 U2 GA. The TPCx-V throughput performance is 541.5 tpsV and price/performance is 57.31 tpsV/$. The results were audited by a TPC certified auditor. The full disclosure report can be found here.

Standards-based architectures continue to be the platforms of choice in both private and public clouds, and now AMD has brought choice back to the marketplace. AMD EPYC™ processors offer not only an industry standard based architecture, but many innovations for performance, density and security. I encourage you to learn more about AMD EPYC™ processors in virtualized environments and consider AMD for your next datacenter upgrade cycle.

Click here for more information about AMD’S innovative new EPYC™ processors

Click here for more information about TPC

Footnotes:

  1. First TPC-C publication: 54 tpmC, $188,562/tpmC, 12/1995, IBM. Fastest as of today: 30,249,688 tpmC, $1.01/tpmC, 12/2010, Oracle
  2. First TPC-D publication: 84 QthD, $52,170/QphD, 09/1992, IBM
  3. First: TPC-H publication 1,280 QthH, $816/QphD, @100GB, 09/1999, Sun. Fastest as of today: 11,612,395 QphH, $0.37/QphH @100TB, 9/2014, Dell
  4. First TPCx-HS publication: 5.07 HSph,$121,231.76/HSph @1TB, 1/2015, Cisco. Fastest as of today: 23.42 HSph, $36,800/HSph @30TB, 10/2015, Cisco
  5. First TPCx-IoT publication: 142,493.85 IoTps,$0.94/ IoTps, 11/2017, Cisco

Raghu Nambiar is Corporate Vice President & CTO, Datacenter Ecosystem & Application Engineering for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

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scott_aylor
Staff
Staff

As vast as the datacenter market is, it’s a relatively short list of companies working together in the day-to-day business. I don’t typically have the pleasure of engaging closely with a company that literally has hundreds of millions of customers like Dropbox. With over 500 million users and 300,000 Dropbox Business customers accessing its global collaboration platform, Dropbox is the latest big name in cloud to deploy the AMD EPYC™ processor in their custom-built infrastructure. 

“AMD EPYC is a compelling processor option for our compute technology, providing Dropbox with the technical specifications required to support the workloads that matter to teams and our individual users,” said Rami Aljamal, Head of Hardware Engineering and Supply Chain at Dropbox. “We are excited to deploy EPYC processors and look forward to working closely with AMD in the future.”

Dropbox.png

Dropbox will leverage AMD EPYC™ 7351P one-socket processor platforms to support future growth beyond its current capabilities and refresh its existing infrastructure for its most demanding compute workloads.

The AMD EPYC™ 7000 series delivers compelling options for the Dropbox offering, meeting performance demands throughout evaluation, qualification and deployment.  With 16 high-performance cores on the EPYC 7351P processor and leading-edge memory bandwidth, AMD continues to drive a strong balance of compute and connectivity while eliminating the need for a second socket. 

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dtjong
Staff
Staff

P1011584.jpgP1011588.jpgP1011585.jpgP1011587.jpg

The 14” Dell Latitude 5495 is a mobile workstation designed for work on the go. Powered by a 4 core, 8 thread AMD Ryzen™ Pro processor, you can multi-task through several productivity applications at the same time. The Ryzen Pro processor also features the premium Radeon™ Vega Graphics to handle visually demanding tasks such as graphics design

Here is the system configuration for the unit I’m testing (Your configuration may vary. Contact your Dell sales representative for an up-to-date configuration list)or 3D rendering. This professionally styled business laptop fits in any office environment and speeds through your work day.

  • AMD Ryzen™ 5 PRO 2500U processor with Radeon™ Vega 8 Graphics (Also available with Ryzen 7 PRO and Ryzen 3 PRO processor configurations)
  • 14 Inch, 1920x1080 Display
  • 16GB DDR4 memory
  • 512GB SSD
  • 68WHr Battery

Utilitarian Professional Design:

The Dell Latitude 5495 is designed to fit any business environment with its simple clean design and matte black color scheme. I find this laptop very portable with its 14 inch screen and measures in at about 13.1” x 9.0” x 0.9” (229mm x 333mm x 22mm) and weighs 1.75 kg, which is perfect size and weight to store in my laptop bag.

While this laptop is portable, it still retains the typical connectors I would need during my typical work day. The left side of the laptop includes a USB Type-C, USB Type-A, SD card reader and smartcard reader.

P1011581.jpg

On the back side you’ll find the Ethernet, HDMI, a second USB Type-A and power connector.

P1011582.jpg

And finally, on the right side there’s a headphone jack, third USB Type-A, VGA connector and a Noble Wedge Lock slot. The Dell Latitude 5495 has pretty much every connection I require without me needing to carry additional adapters.

P1011583.jpg

Performance Underneath the Hood:

The Dell Latitude 5495 I’m testing here uses an AMD Ryzen 5 PRO 2500U processor but it’s also available in Ryzen 3 and 7 options. Combined with the premium Radeon Vega Graphics, the Dell Latitude is ready to handle everything from word processing to content creation.

Chart.jpg

All Day Battery Life:

Battery life is critical to me unless I plan on being plugged in all day long. For battery testing I ran the MobileMark 2014 Office Productivity test on my unit, which is configured with a 68WHr battery, AMD Ryzen 5 PRO Mobile 2500U processor and a 1080p touch screen. The resulting score I got was 615 minutes for the battery life. That’s over 10 hours of battery, which is more than enough to get me through an entire day of work without needing to recharge.

Security and Manageability:

The AMD Ryzen PRO processors are based on the same powerful “Zen” core architecture found in consumer laptops and desktops but these PRO variants are built with an emphasis on reliability, and offer additional security and manageability features.

For extra security, the Dell Latitude 5495 uses the Ryzen Pro processor’s Secure Boot feature to verify only authorized drivers and operating system are running on the laptop to prevent threats right from power on.

For IT professionals needing to manage a fleet of laptops, they can easily do so with DASH manageability support on Ryzen Pro processors. This allows IT professionals to manage, monitor, and deploy multiple computer systems easily.

So that’s a quick look at the Dell Latitude 5495 laptop powered by AMD Ryzen™ PRO processors with Radeon™ Vega graphics; A laptop that delivers serious performance, security and reliability.

P1011592.jpgP1011591.jpgP1011579.jpgP1011589.jpg

David Tjong, Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

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What system-on-chip (SoC) provides the ability to run four independent displays in 4K resolution, handle AAA gaming and provide client-side 3D rendering? The AMD Ryzen™ Embedded V1000 SoC.

The AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 processor family has won over customers from a variety of industries with its ability to deliver up to 2X boosti in processing performance while reducing the design, form factor and thermal management challenges common in discrete CPU and GPU configurations. Not to mention the up to 3X increase in GPU performance over competitive solutionsii. By coupling a high-performance CPU and GPU on a single die, this marks a new age of embedded processors in terms of performance and graphics capabilities.

I’d like to talk about two customers of ours that are taking full advantage of the AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 feature set to bring truly unique and engaging experiences to the gaming and maker industries.

The UDOO BOLT – The Ultimate Maker Board

I’m an engineer at heart and anytime I get the chance to tinker, create or make a computer from scratch, I always love it. And that’s what the people behind the UDOO BOLT want their customers to do, in a really powerful way! Using the full power of AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 processors, the UDOO BOLT is a really cool maker board that allows customers to do all kinds of creating. Maurizio Caporali, product manager at UDOO, knows how great the BOLT is for any kind of tinkerer “The UDOO BOLT represents the highest level of graphics, processing power and flexibility in the field of maker boards, giving makers the chance to play AAA quality games, or drive Client-Side 3D rendering, or even create Virtual and Augmented Reality experiences.”

The UDOO BOLT was launched on crowdfunding site Kickstarter and has more than 1,100 “backers” contributing more than $500,000 U.S. – beating handily the $100,000 goal for the Kickstarter campaign. If you want to experience the power of AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 SoC in a “maker-package” this is your chance.

The Power of a Console in the Palm of your Hand

Showing the power of AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 processors and AMD Radeon™ Vega 8 Graphics, the SMACH Z, a handheld console to play PC games on the go, gives players the ability to immerse themselves in portable HD gaming at silky smooth frame rates.

“The introduction of the SMACH Z handheld console will create new opportunities for portable gaming devices, enabling users to play AAA titles at HD framerates, delivering desktop-quality power and graphics in the palm of players’ hands,” said Daniel Fernandez, CEO, SMACH. “By leveraging the new AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 with superior graphics capabilities and mega processing power in our console, we are ready to revolutionize the on-the-go consumer gaming experience.”

SMACH Z raised more than $740,000 via Kickstarter and Indiegogo crowdfunding campaigns. If you haven’t had a chance to check out SMACH Z, you can view their trailer from E3.

The Many Applications of AMD Embedded

What’s most impressive to me is that in a short period of time, customers from a variety of industries have come to understand the power and capabilities of the transformative AMD Ryzen Embedded V1000 processors. They understand that whatever their solution is, whether gaming, creating, or high-definition displays, AMD provides a seamlessly-integrated SoC solution that sets a new standard in processing power for next-generation embedded designs.

We can’t wait to see what else our customers will do with the AMD Embedded family of products. Stay tuned here for more.

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Testing done at AMD Embedded Software Engineering Lab. The AMD R-series Embedded SOC formerly codenamed "Merlin Falcon" scored 2399 and the AMD V-series V1807 scored 4978, when running 3dMark® 11P benchmark which measures GPU performance. (4978/2399=2.075) The AMD R-series Embedded SOC formerly called "Merlin Falcon" scored 273 and the AMD V-series V1807 scored 665 on Cinebench R15 nT which measures multi-threaded CPU performance. (665/273= 2.435). AMD Embedded R-Series RX-421BD used a AMD “Bettong” Platform, with a 2x8GB DDR4-2400 RAM, 250GB SSD Drive (non-rotating), TDP 35W, STAPM and ECC Disabled, Graphics Driver 17.40.2011-171026a-320350C-AES, BIOS RBE1306A. AMD Ryzen Embedded V-Series V1807B used the AMD “Dibbler” Platform with 2x8GB DDR4 3200 RAM, 250GB SSD Drive (non-rotating), TDP 35W, STAPM and ECC Disabled, Graphics Driver 17.40-171114a-320676E-AES-2-wRV-E9171, BIOS TDB1100EA.   Both systems ran Microsoft Windows® 10 Pro. EMB-144.

[ii]Comparison is based on performance measured using the 3dMark® 11P benchmark.  The AMD V-series V1807B scored 5618; the Intel Core i7-7700HQ scored 1783. The score for the Intel Core i7-7700HQ was measured using HP Omen with 8GB, Intel® HD 630 Graphics, 1x8GB DDR4 2400 RAM, 1TB 7200rpm HD, Microsoft Windows 10 Pro, Graphics Driver 21.20.16.4627, BIOS F.24. The score for AMD Ryzen Embedded V-Series V1807B was measured using the AMD “Dibbler” Platform, 2x8GB DDR4 3200 RAM, 250GB SSD Drive (non-rotating), TDP 45W, STAPM Enabled, ECC Disabled, Microsoft Windows 10 Pro, Graphics Driver 17.40-171114a-320676E-AES-2-wRV-E9171, BIOS TDB1100EA. EMB-146.

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We just celebrated the one year anniversary of the introduction of the AMD EPYC processor. As exciting as it is to look back, in this industry we must continue to look forward.

The world is undergoing unprecedented change driven by technology advances that are connecting billions of people to the internet and to each other, creating enormous amounts of data in the process. These connections and data represent an opportunity for companies to improve their business, create new revenue streams, even invent whole new models to solve the world’s most challenging problems.

Whole industries are being transformed as state-of-the-art software running on innovative processors demonstrate both the collective and personalized power of analytics harnessing big data. Healthcare systems that leverage the totality of medical data for personalized diagnosis; recommendation systems for targeted marketing to better serve the customer; transportation systems that reduce traffic and improve routing are just a few examples. There are many more: education, smart cities, genomics, drug discovery, energy efficiency, safety, security, etc.

Many of these systems use services that are now easily accessible to anyone through cloud providers. These providers run huge storage and server farms all built on a foundation of massive compute power with the flexibility to handle a wide variety of workloads.

The revolutionary AMD EPYC processor has gained significant momentum in the industry this year. It is truly exciting to see it being adopted by major server vendors and cloud service providers. With its high core count, large memory capacity and memory bandwidth, and vast I/O density, AMD EPYC is helping customers meet their performance needs without breaking the bank. By offering a choice in x86 architecture, AMD EPYC provides the flexibility, performance and security for the evolving needs of modern data center applications translating directly to more performance per dollar.

Partnerships are critical to bringing the potential of EPYC to anyone who wants to leverage its unique blend of performance and features. Big Data Analytics (BDA) are now commonly used on-premise, in the cloud, and in hybrid environments. An integral part of BDA is the Hadoop ecosystem.  At AMD, we’ve been working diligently to expand our software ecosystem partnerships with the industry leaders in this space: Cloudera, Hortonworks, MapR and Transwarp. Today, we are focusing on partnerships and reference designs, both single-socket and dual-socket, with these partners providing the flexibility, performance and scalability needed to meet the requirements of modern data processing.

The “no compromise” single-socket design ensures you are only paying for the processing power the application needs. Single-socket servers support all of the I/O and memory bandwidth available to a dual-socket server without the extra cost. The versatile dual-socket design offers the highest available AMD EPYC core density and memory capacity, enabling our highest performance. Comprehensive offers based on these reference designs will soon be available from our server partners.

The advent of big data has revolutionized analytics and data science by allowing enterprises to store, access and analyze massive amounts of data of almost any type from any source. The AMD EPYC processor family has arrived at the perfect time as the underlying hardware solution to provide the perfect mix of flexibility and scalability of resources. I look forward to continuing to work with our ecosystem partners to bring the AMD EPYC processors to their customers.

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jerrygadbois
Staff
Staff

At AMD, the impact of our products is only as strong as the partners and ecosystem that surrounds and supports them. That concept was not lost on us when we introduced the EPYC 7000 series, our next-generation server processor that has redefined the datacenter environment. Since its launch last June, EPYC has appreciated the backing of a strong cast of OEMs/ODMs, cloud leaders, integrators and hardware/software suppliers that have embraced this long-awaited alternative to power their datacenters.

Driving long-lasting change also requires a dedication to the sales channel that underpins everything we do for the customer and end-user. EPYC is already fueling a resurgence of value and innovation in the server market, and today we are pleased to provide an update on AMD EPYC in the channel.

Setting a Strong Foundation for the Channel

AMD has prioritized two channel segments that are critical to our mutual success in the coming quarters.

The Commercial Channel supports a full system approach to EPYC-based servers. We work closely with the industry’s leading OEMs to optimize their EPYC processor-based platforms and provide some of the best server options on the market to national service providers, Value-Added Resellers (VARS), and distributors. The HPE ProLiant DL385 Gen10 is an excellent example of a strong product brand that tightly collaborates with the Commercial Channel to deliver and support its products.

System integrators, distributors and barebones providers are enabled through our Component Channel, integrating the performance of EPYC processors into the systems they design for their end customers’ needs.   Penguin Computing’s Altus® EPYC processor-based servers are one example of the high-performance computing, enterprise datacenter, and cloud services solutions available in this segment.

Only with our channel partners can AMD solidify its reputation as a supplier that provides groundbreaking hardware for competitive systems, while fostering synergistic relationships that deliver exceptional returns on investment for all.

AMD Channel Strategy and Goals for EPYC

The AMD channel program did not start and end with the launch of EPYC processor. From distributors to system integrators and resellers, AMD is underscoring our desire to educate, enable and market the benefits of actively collaborating on EPYC processor-based solutions.

AMD offers a variety of Reseller Partner programs from distributors to System Integrators (SIs).   As an example, our System Integrator Partner Program provides tier-based incentives and support to identify, close and deploy EPYC solutions.

Why EPYC processor is Right for the Channel

Seven years ago, AMD explored what the next decade held for the future of data processing and its dependent industries. Since that time, and from the ground up, AMD designed and developed EPYC processor to meet those needs. The result is a processor perfectly suited for the demands of today’s end-users that excels in workloads and configurations for high-performance computing, cloud, virtualization, machine learning, data analytics, and software-defined storage. Excellence in these areas translates to more opportunity for partners to build no-compromise single-socket and record setting dual-socket systems that serve customers across a range of workloads and deployments.

EPYC Agenda for the Future

As we approach the one-year anniversary of EPYC processor in the datacenter market, AMD sees a path for even more growth and innovation through strong channel relationships.

Prior to the introduction of the EPYC processor, the server channel devolved with a lack of competition that allowed prices to increase and partnerships to suffer. Bringing a competitive solution to the market is driving not only technological change, but also redefining and deepening synergistic partnerships in the ecosystem that are equally as valuable.

AMD’s channel business is only successful with, and through, our solution-ready partners. We are dedicated to educating, enabling, and marketing the revolutionary benefits of EPYC across the channel. The EPYC era has begun and is available in the channel today; we look forward to the journey.

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High Performance Computing (HPC) is one of the most important and fastest growing markets in the datacenter. It’s perhaps an overused term, but HPC as referring to applying massive computing resources to solve complex problems has become critical well beyond its start in scientific research. Multiple workloads from finance, retail, oil and gas, weather, engineering, and education leverage HPC today. Common to many of these applications is the importance of memory, and I/O bandwidth.

A large percentage of HPC workloads are dependent on memory bandwidth as the problems being addressed often don’t fit into caches like other applications can. Insufficient memory bandwidth or insufficient memory capacity can result in CPU compute engines waiting idle. You can have the most CPU cores in the world, but if they aren’t fed the right data in an efficient manner, they can’t do useful work. The situation is analogous to race cars - you can have the biggest engine ever made under the hood, but if you have a tiny fuel line that can’t provide enough fuel to the engine, the car won’t go very fast.

Beyond memory bandwidth, you also need enough Input/Output (I/O) bandwidth to ensure that data can get in and out of the CPU and memory. Critical I/O interfaces to storage and the network – be it Ethernet or Infiniband-  are usually connected via PCIe. Bandwidth and latency on those interfaces can quickly become the bottleneck in systems with overloaded PCIe links. When balanced optimally, jobs are loaded and run faster, you can do deeper analysis to get better results, and/or the number of systems to achieve this analysis is reduced.

In recent years the PCIe connections are also being increasingly used to extend the compute capability of the system by connecting to GPUs or FPGA-based accelerators. Many applications scale well with the vector math capabilities of GPUs or by dedicating logic in FPGAs to the inner loops of critical algorithms.  Perhaps the most important emerging applications in machine learning are where “heterogenous” systems with high-performance CPUs and accelerators are the right answer.

All of this thinking went into the design of the AMD EPYC™ processor, and it shows. EPYC is an architecture built for the workloads and applications of current and future datacenters.

  • AMD EPYC has up to 33% more memory bandwidth per core than the competition to keep data flowing to the processors1;
  • A 2P AMD EPYC 7601 processor offers up to 2.6x the memory capacity than a 2P Intel Xeon Platinum 81802;
  • All AMD EPYC processors have the ability to support up to 128 PCIe lanes so that I/O does not become a bottleneck3;
  • EPYC has outstanding floating point capabilities with world record performance in multiple floating-point benchmarks and real HPC applications4;
  • Single and dual-socket EPYC-based server solutions allows up to six GPUs or FPGAs to be attached to the CPU with enough lanes left over for high-speed storage devices and high-speed Ethernet or InfiniBand connections.

Many AMD EPYC platforms on the market today deliver outstanding performance on memory bound workloads. For virtualized and memory-centric solutions, both HPE and Dell offer 2U rack-based systems – the HPE ProLiant DL385 Gen10 and the Dell PowerEdge R7425. For ultra-dense compute solutions, Supermicro, Cray and Cisco have 4 nodes in a 2U (4N/2U) solutions. The Supermicro AS -2123BT-HNC0R, Cray CS500 and Cisco UCS C4200/C125.

AMD EPYC has been met with great excitement by the market, and its balanced architecture delivers world record performance. And looking ahead, we have a strong roadmap that is primed to deliver premium performance and innovation for years to come.

Endnotes

1 AMD EPYC™ 7601 processor supports up to 8 channels of DDR4-2667, versus the Xeon Platinum 8180 processor at 6 channels of DDR4-2667. NAP-42

2 A single AMD EPYC™ 7601 processor offers up to 2TB/processor (x 2 = 4TB), versus a single Xeon Platinum 8180 processor at 768Gb/processor (x 2 = 1.54TB). NAP-44

3AMD EPYC™ processor supports up to 128 PCIe® Gen 3 I/O lanes (in both 1 and 2-socket configuration), versus the Intel® Xeon® SP Series processor supporting a maximum of 48 lanes PCIe® Gen 3 per CPU, plus 20 lanes in the chipset (max of 68 lanes on 1 socket and 116 lanes on 2 socket). NAP-56

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Cautionary Statement

This blog contains forward-looking statements concerning Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) including, but not limited to, the strength, expectations and benefits regarding AMD’s technology roadmap, which are made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are commonly identified by words such as "would," "may," "expects," "believes," "plans," "intends," "projects" and other terms with similar meaning. Investors are cautioned that the forward-looking statements in this blog are based on current beliefs, assumptions and expectations, speak only as of the date of this blog and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations. Such statements are subject to certain known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond AMD's control, that could cause actual results and other future events to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. Investors are urged to review in detail the risks and uncertainties in AMD's Securities and Exchange Commission filings, including but not limited to AMD's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2018.

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