Skip navigation

Radeon Pro Graphics

3 Posts authored by: bsavery Employee

For today’s release of Blender 2.81, we've updated our Radeon ProRender plug-in to support this new version of Blender (don’t worry, the plug-in still works fine with Blender 2.80). This brings some great new updates for artists, helping with the dream of creating reality in their renders!

 

Full Spectrum Rendering

Radeon ProRender enables physically-based GPU rendering through OpenCL. Now with our Full Spectrum Rendering modes, it also brings Vulkan-based ray tracing to Windows and Linux users. This allows the user to set the quality level to a wide spectrum from rasterized to fully path-traced (in OpenCL) render quality, enabling everything from fast viewport previews to accurate final renders.

 

 

Better User Documentation

Rendering software is complicated. There are many shader nodes, light parameters, and sampling settings to keep track of. For all users, novice to expert, good documentation is key. We have invested significantly in updating the documentation for our Radeon ProRender plug-ins to help you out with this: https://radeon-pro.github.io/RadeonProRenderDocs/plugins/blender/about.html

 

Here you will find detailed explanations of the plug-in settings, as well as images to throw light on software features, and in many cases, example scenes to illustrate concepts. Check out the documentation today.

 

 

Easy Volumes and Fog

Adding realism to scenes for rendering can be a challenging task for an artist. One phenomenon in the real world that helps with this is fog. Very few atmospheres are completely clear and adding fog to your scene will cause distant objects to fade just like the real world. We’ve added a simple button in the Blender World panel to quickly create a fog effect. 

 


 

Layered Textures and Shaders

Complex materials lead to a complex Material Node Graph. We added two new nodes to simplify the artist’s life. Layered Textures let you blend up to 8 textures in a single node. Similarly, the Layered Shader lets you blend multiple Uber or Principled nodes to create complex materials with masks.

 

 

Other material improvements

We are constantly working to improve other materials as well. This includes:

  • Glass materials, roughness for glass, and glossy BSDFs
  • Better matching Cycles in the Principled BSDF
  • Close matching of Blender displacement
  • Better light intensity matching
  • And more!

 

Download and check out our updated plug-in for Blender 2.81 (and 2.80) now!

 

DOWNLOAD THE PLUG-IN NOW

 

 

Brian Savery is a Professional Graphics Software Development Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third-party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

 

Title image created by Valentin Surdila using AMD Radeon ProRender for Blender.

 

Blender Car demo scene created by Mike Pan.

 

Blender is a registered trademark of the Blender Foundation in EU and USA. OpenCL is a trademark of Apple Inc. used by permission by Khronos Group Inc. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. Vulkan and the Vulkan logo are registered trademarks of the Khronos Group Inc. Linux is the trademark of Linus Torvalds in the US and other countries. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

Just in time for Autodesk University 2019 and the exciting release of the new AMD Radeon Pro W5700 workstation graphics card, our Radeon ProRender physically-based rendering plug-ins have been updated with new features and tools including Full Spectrum Rendering Vulkan ray tracing for the Autodesk Maya v2.8 plug-in and some helpful new user documentation.

 

 

3ds Max Plug-In Updates

While many of the below updates are for the Maya plug-in, the Radeon ProRender plug-in for Autodesk 3ds Max v2.6 has received many core updates to the rendering software and denoisers. Also, there are updates to the .rpr export functionality. These exported files can be used to pass data between plug-ins or rendered from the command line with the “RPRSRender64.exe” utility.

 

 

 

Full Spectrum Rendering

For Maya, we added Full Spectrum Rendering modes for rendering (Windows only). This brings Vulkan-based ray tracing for fast viewport and final renders. It is especially useful for quick “playblast” style previews. The render settings allow the user to set the quality level to a wide spectrum from rasterized to fully path-traced (in OpenCL) render quality, enabling everything from fast viewport previews to accurate final renders. 

 


 

 

Support for Maya MASH Instances

Adding complexity to a scene greatly helps with realism. For example, pieces of dust on a floor or thousands of trees in a forest. However, it would be extremely overwhelming to manually place each tree in a forest yourself. Maya’s MASH system makes rendering these instances easy, and now Radeon ProRender supports them as well!

 

 

 

Improved User Documentation

Rendering software is complicated. There are many shader nodes, light parameters, and sampling settings to keep track of. For all users, expert to novice, good documentation is key. We have invested significantly in updating the documentation for our Radeon ProRender plug-ins to help with this.


Here you will find detailed explanations of the plug-in settings, as well as images to throw more light on software features, and in many cases, example scenes to illustrate concepts. Check them out today at https://radeon-pro.github.io/RadeonProRenderDocs/plugins/maya/about.html

 

 

 

Better Support for Various Material Nodes

Lastly, we have invested serious effort in better supporting the Maya Material Nodes. This is an ongoing effort, so please if you see an issue with a specific shader network you are using, please let us know in our community forum. Here are a few details of what we changed:

  • Expedited export of layered texture nodes
  • More math operations in the RPR Arithmetic node
  • The Shadow Catcher Node is now called the “Matte” node and includes reflection catching
  • And more! (please see the release notes)

 

 

Download and check out our updated plug-ins for Autodesk 3ds Max and Maya today!

 

DOWNLOAD THE PLUG-INS NOW

 

 

Brian Savery is a Professional Graphics Software Development Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third-party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

 

Title image created by Serghei Nenov using AMD Radeon ProRender for Maya

Autodesk, the Autodesk logo, 3ds Max, and Maya are registered trademarks or trademarks of Autodesk, Inc., and/or its subsidiaries and/or affiliates in the USA and/or other countries. OpenCL is a trademark of Apple Inc. used by permission by Khronos Group Inc. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. Vulkan and the Vulkan logo are registered trademarks of the Khronos Group Inc. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

Today, we are providing a preview of Radeon ProRender with Full Spectrum Rendering in a beta Windows 10 plug-in for Blender 2.80. This gives artists a viewport that can be scaled from super-fast rasterized to fully ray-traced, all with physically accurate materials and lighting. You can download the beta plug-in from here.

 

 

What is Full Spectrum Rendering?

In essence, Full Spectrum Rendering is an extension of Radeon ProRender beyond "just" a path-traced renderer using OpenCL. We use the same Radeon ProRender SDK but have a different rendering backend for Full Spectrum Rendering. This new rendering backend uses rasterization to render the scene like many game engines or the EEVEE viewport renderer in Blender. However, it uses Vulkan for faster rendering and then can add ray-traced effects such as reflection, refraction, and ambient occlusion. These effects are achieved using compute shaders and smart denoising.  The end effect of the renderer is to harness all the power of the GPU, including taking advantage of GPU ray tracing acceleration where available. Dialing up or down these effects is what allows Full Spectrum Rendering to scale for speed and quality.

 

The other great part here is for developers. Minimal changes to the Blender plug-in were made to take advantage of this. And using the universal Radeon ProRender SDK allows the developer and user to change the quality and speed of rendering in only a few lines of code.

 

 

Why do I need Full Spectrum Rendering?

There are two huge benefits for artists with this implementation of Radeon ProRender: it is an all-in-one solution, and it helps to fill a wide gap between OpenGL viewports (such as EEVEE) and full path-tracers (like Cycles). Most of these benefits are realized in the viewport, for lookdev: setting up scenes, and changing lighting, shaders, etc. Now users can get a more interactive experience like EEVEE with more physically correct soft shadows and reflections and refractions. Furthermore, these are done without the user having to set up light probes or do any other manual tasks. Finally, the quality/speed settings can be changed for more interactive or physically correct lighting and shading based on the user's needs.

 

How to use it.

For now, the beta plug-in only support Windows 10 with Full Spectrum Rendering (Linux is supported in the Radeon ProRender SDK). Download and install the plug-in and select Radeon ProRender as your default renderer in Blender. Switch your viewport to rendered mode, and the rendering will start. There will be an "RPR" menu in the viewport which, if you click on it, will offer the options for Low, Medium, High and Full render settings. (Full uses the OpenCL full path-tracer, while all the others are using Vulkan).

 

For best results, use Blender's Principled material on your models. A few interesting things to try are:

  • Interacting with the scene, moving, scaling objects around
  • Changing shaders
  • Changing lighting
  • Changing the RPR quality settings and observing differences in interactivity and in lighting quality.

 

Thanks for trying it out, and as this is a new product, we look forward to your feedback!

 

DOWNLOAD THE BETA PLUG-IN NOW

 

 

Brian Savery is a Professional Graphics Software Development Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third-party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

 

Blender is a registered trademark of the Blender Foundation in EU and USA. OpenCL is a trademark of Apple Inc. used by permission by Khronos Group Inc. OpenGL and the oval logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Hewlett Packard Enterprise in the United States and/or other countries worldwide. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. Vulkan and the Vulkan logo are registered trademarks of the Khronos Group Inc. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.