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[Originally posted on 06/14/17.]

 

E3 is here, and so far it’s been pure gaming overload! I joined Annie Lee from Radeon Technologies Group to attend the major press conferences and now we’re hitting the show floor to capture the sights and sounds of the annual gaming convention.

 

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Come on down to Bethesdaland!

 

It all kicked off with the Bethesdaland showcase, a carnival split into themed areas modeled after Bethesda franchises like DOOM, Prey, and Quake Champions. We checked out flaming drinks, watched intricate balloon Vault Boys get created before our eyes, had caricature artists put our likeness into the world of Dishonored, and witnessed some intense after-dark Quake Champions matches.

 

The icing on the cake were reveals of The Evil Within 2, DOOM VFR, and Wolfenstein: The New Colossus on a massive outdoor screen.

 

Ubisoft Makes Us Cry

 

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The Ubisoft booth is absolutely massive.

 

The pre-E3 excitement ramped up at the Ubisoft conference, where we literally wept tears of happiness at the announcement of Beyond Good and Evil 2, saw some intense live gameplay from Far Cry 5, and even cheered on the legend himself – Shigeru Miyamoto – as he took the stage in a surprise appearance.

 

Alienware Lights Up The Warehouse District

 

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Later that night we headed to the Warehouse District and partied with Alienware at Alienware Live. Between the DJ, Radeon GPU giveaways, AMD-themed drinks, VR demos, a livestream of Square Enix Collective’s Oh My Godheads, 360 photos, and a customizable backpack creation station, it was an awesome way to spend the evening.

 

Hitting the E3 Show Floor

 

On Tuesday we loaded up on hand sanitizer, caffeine, and an iron will to survive the crowds, and navigated through the colossal billboards and unreleased games. You’ll see blogs featuring the sights and sounds from the show floor, so stay tuned because we have a lot more E3 goodies to show you.

 

Make sure you follow Radeon on our social media channels to get all the updates firsthand.

 

Find us on:

Facebook

Twitter

Instagram

 

 

Jason Evangelho, Sr. Technical Marketing Specialist for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 08/30/17.]

 

We were at QuakeCon last week and something caught our eye walking through the BYOC area: a wooden box, carved meticulously to let an orange glow seep into the dark convention center. A few people were standing around it and admiring the rig.

 

The PC belonged to John Lahtinen, a Red Team member. We asked him some questions about the build—check out the PC in more detail below and admire the stunning craftsmanship!

 

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Specs:

  • CPU: Ryzen™ 5 1500X
  • GPU: XFX Radeon™ RX 570
  • Motherboard: ASRock AB350 Gaming-ITX/AC
  • RAM: 16 GB GeIL EVO X RGB DDR4
  • Storage: 480 GB Radeon R7 SSD
  • Power supply: Corsair SF600
  • Fans: APEVIA CF12SL-SOG 120mm Orange (x3)

 

What inspired you to create this build?

 

When Ryzen 7 launched back in March, AMD Red Team Plus members received a sample kit packaged inside a wood box with the Ryzen logo etched on the door. The dimensions, hardware, and logo were almost begging to be converted into an ITX build. Once the AM4 ITX motherboards arrived at retailers, I knew what I wanted to take with me to Quakecon.

 

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What was the most difficult part of the process?

 

Motherboard and GPU mounting were a challenge. Motherboard mounting hole dimensions are just too precise for me to be comfortable with attaching them directly to relatively soft wood. After some determined Google searching, I managed to find what seemed to be a rather ideal solution on the SFF Network forums (https://smallformfactor.net/). An enterprising fellow out of Finland had fabricated a brilliant little modular aluminum ITX frame. I’ll be reviewing this frame (called the NATi Tray) soon, and will be using it again with future wood builds.

 

Unfortunately, it wasn’t smooth-sailing from there. The thickness of the wood in the rear of the case obstructed video cable connection, so out came the dremel! Which was a bit painful when you think you’re so close to completion. And then you discover it isn’t just the wood causing the obstruction, but the thickness of the metal GPU bracket frame as well. Out came the GPU frame.

 

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Where did you get help or what resources did you use?

 

The local Techshop was a fantastic resource for this project. I didn’t have access to or experience with a laser cutter, so I enlisted help from one of the many craftsmen there. I found some truly remarkable projects in the works over there that have spawned ideas for future builds.

 

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Do you remember your first rig? What made you want to put it together?

 

The first rig I built? That was a loooong time ago. It used an AMD K6-2 400 MHz and lasted me many years until I upgraded and passed it along to my sister. It was part desire to have a deeper understanding of the computer and part pragmatism (not wanting to pay someone to fix/upgrade it) that prompted me to go the DIY route. I’ve done DIY builds ever since.

 

What games are you playing on the rig right now? What games/franchises got you into PC gaming?

 

I’m a big FPS guy. The original Doom was the catalyst for my interest in PC gaming. Naturally my gaming last weekend at Quakecon was dominated by id Software games: Quake Champions, Doom, and even some good old Quake II. My obsessions have varied over time- Starcraft, Skyrim, Battlefield 4, and Fallout 4. But these days I typically play a lot of Overwatch and PUBG.

 

Why Radeon?

 

I’ve used so many Radeon GPUs over the years: HD 5770, HD 6950, R9 270X, R9 290, RX 480, and RX 570 – all of them have been outstanding. Supporting inclusive technologies like OpenCL, FreeSync, and Vulkan is important to me. They all equate to better experiences – playing Vulkan Doom on a Freesync monitor all last weekend is absolute proof of that. And of course top-notch Crimson Software with ReLive, which I use frequently for game recording/streaming.

 

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What upcoming PC games are you most excited for?

 

I’m really looking forward to a few that were showcased during this year’s E3: Wolfenstein II, Beyond Good and Evil 2 (for its impressive engine with real-time scaling of multiple galaxies), and Sea of Thieves (how can shooting yourself out of a cannon not be fun?).

 

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Got a Radeon-powered rig you’re proud of? Want to show off your modding skills? Tag us on social media to bring your rig to the spotlight!

 

Interested in joining the Red Team? Find out more about the Red Team community!

 

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Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 04/27/17.]

 

Real time strategy (RTS) games have a long and amazing history with PC gaming. Very few RTS titles have the depth and longevity of “Dawn of War™” games. The new sequel to the critically acclaimed “Dawn of War” titles, “Warhammer® 40,000™: Dawn of War® III”, pits Orks, Eldar and Blood Raven Space marines against each other in on the war-torn battlegrounds of the 41st millennium. Radeon™ graphics kicks up this fast paced gameplay to new levels. Here is our performance at a glance:

 

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  • Up to 7% more performance using Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.4.4 and Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III on Radeon™ RX 580 (8GB) graphics than Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.4.31.

 

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  • Up to 75% more performance using Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.4.4 with Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III on the Radeon™ RX 570 (8GB) graphics card than with Nvidia GeForce GTX1050TI (4GB) on NV 381.89 with DirectX®11 at 1920×1080 (1080p)2.

 

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  • Up to 24% more performance using Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.4.4 with Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III on the Radeon™ RX 580 (8GB) graphics card than with Nvidia GeForce GTX1060 (6GB) on NV 381.89 with DirectX®11 at 2560×1440 (1440p)3.

 

Download Radeon™ Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.4.4 today and experience “Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III” like no other.

 

 

Gurman Singh, Software Product Marketing for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of April 24, 2017 on the Radeon™ RX 580 (8GB) graphics card, on a test system comprising Intel i7 5960X CPU, 16GB DDR4-2666 Mhz system memory, Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition driver 17.4.3 and Radeon Software Crimson Edition 17.4.4 and Windows 10 x64 using the game Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III™ At 2560x1440, Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.4.3 scored on average 58.1 frames per second and Radeon Software Crimson Edition 17.4.4 scored on average 61.9 frames per second using the Radeon RX 580 8GB graphics card, which is 7% faster performance. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-131
  2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of April 25, 2017 on the Radeon™ RX 570 8GB and the NVidia GTX1050TI 4GB graphics card, on a test system comprising of Intel 5960k CPU (3.0 GHz), 16GB DDR4-2666 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64 using the game Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III on maximum graphics preset with DirectX®11. The Radeon test system used Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.4.4. The NVidia test system used NV 381.89. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 1920x1080 with the Radeon Software driver 17.4.4, the 8GB Radeon RX570 running Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III had 83.4 frames per second and the NV 381.65 and the 4GB 1050TI had 47.7 frames per second which is 75% more average frames per second on the 8GB Radeon RX 570 when comparing the 8GB Radeon RX570 to the 4GB NVidia GTX1050TI. Performance may vary based on use of final driver. RS-133
  3. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of April 25, 2017 on the Radeon™ RX 580 8GB and the NVidia GTX1060 6GB graphics card, on a test system comprising of Intel 5960k CPU (3.0 GHz), 16GB DDR4-2666 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64 using the game Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III on maximum graphics preset with DirectX®11. The Radeon test system used Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.4.4. The NVidia test system used NV 381.89. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 2560x1440 with the Radeon Software driver 17.4.4, the 8GB Radeon RX580 running Warhammer 40,000: Dawn of War III had 63.2 frames per second and the NV 381.89 and the 6GB 1060 had 51.1 frames per second which is 24% more average frames per second on the 8GB Radeon RX 580 when comparing the 8GB Radeon RX580 to the 6GB NVidia GTX1060. Performance may vary based on use of final driver. RS-132

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[Originally posted on 01/24/17.]

 

With the release of Resident Evil 7: Biohazard, gamers are certainly in for a treat.

 

Resident Evil 7: Biohazard gameplay is completely refreshed to take the survival horror genre to the next level. To match this experience, Radeon™ graphics cards are certainly up to the challenge. Here is our competitive performance at a glance:

 

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Up to 22% faster performance using Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.1.1 and Resident Evil® 7: Biohazard on the Radeon™ RX 480 graphics card than with NVidia GTX1060 on NV 378.49 with DirectX®11 at 2560×1440 (1440p).1

 

Download Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition today and experience gameplay like no other!

 

 

Gurman Singh, Software Product Marketing for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of January 24th, 2016 on the Radeon™ RX 480 8GB, Radeon™ RX 470 4GB, NVidia GTX1060 3GB and the NVidia GTX 1060 6GB and the NVidia GTX1050TI graphics card, on a test system comprising of Intel 5960k CPU (3.0 GHz), 16GB DDR4-2666 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64 using the game Resident Evil 7: Biohazard on graphics preset ultra with DirectX®11. The Radeon test system used Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.1.1. The NVidia test system used NV 378.49. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 2560x1440 with the Radeon Software driver 17.1.1, the 8GB Radeon RX 480 and 4GB Radeon RX470 running Resident Evil 7: Biohazard had 73.5 and 59.0 frames per second, respectively, and the NV 378.49 and 6GB NVidia GTX1060 and the 4GB 1050TI running Resident Evil 7: Biohazard had 60.2 and 39.8 frames per second, respectively, which is 22% lower average frames per second when comparing the 8GB Radeon RX480 to the 6GB NVidia GTX1060. Performance may vary based on use of final driver. RS-111

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[Originally posted on 07/18/17.]

 

Throughout my years as a GPU reviewer, I’ve enjoyed having a front row seat to some great advancements in 3D graphics.

 

Some of them were extremely complex. You could tell it took years for talented engineering teams to refine the foundations leading to these leaps forward in rendering and performance. Understanding and explaining in simpler terms the inner workings of those technologies often proved quite challenging, but most of the time revealing the benefits was straightforward: “Here’s your performance increase” or “Here’s your higher quality screenshot.”

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LG 34UC79G

 

Then came adaptive/variable refresh rate (A/VRR). For once, the theory behind it was simple. Traditional synchronization controlled by the monitor at a fixed rate causes well-known issues such as screen tearing and stuttering because it doesn’t match the GPU’s “rhythm”. So why not let the GPU run the show? Though it’s a simple and elegant technique, it still requires advanced display engines, smarter drivers, and an extensive validation effort.

 

The results, however, were remarkable. After two hours gaming with ARR, I realized this was a true leap forward. Going back to a traditional monitor was painful.

 

The concept of ARR is easy enough to explain and understand, but showing the tangible benefits isn’t so easy. No illustration can show you the real thing. No words can describe the buttery smooth experience. You just have to try it.

 

If you’re gaming on a traditional 60 Hz monitor, to reach the ideal stutter-free and tearing-free experience you’ll want your system to be able to run well over 60 fps (65? 70? 75 fps on average?) and set it up with vertical synchronization (V-Sync). With ARR you could get a similar experience at 50 fps. Too good to be true? Can Radeon™ FreeSync technology give you the same experience as a faster graphic card? Yes it can.

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Samsung CHG70

 

Giving away such a feature for free is not an easy decision to make. ARR breathes new life into a mid-range graphics card, which could mean you could upgrade your monitor now and upgrade your GPU later and get noticeable results. And while we’d love you buy a new graphics card, we also we believe in strongly in Radeon FreeSync.

 

I’m glad the Radeon FreeSync architects saw things through this lens. In the long run, what’s beneficial for PC gaming is good for the industry surrounding it. That’s why early on we decided to develop Radeon FreeSync in such a way that ARR could be implemented in as many monitors as possible – we don’t charge a license fee, so there’s no any extra hardware cost to manufacturers or consumers. We want every PC gamer to enjoy stutter-free and tear-free displays.

 

Radeon FreeSync is arguably one of the fastest growing visual technologies for gaming today, and we’re proud to have planted this seed that received tremendous support from the display industry. From entry-level 1080p monitors, to the gorgeous high-resolution curved ultrawides, there is a Radeon FreeSync monitor for every gamer.

 

Today there are over 200 Radeon FreeSync, Radeon FreeSync with LFC and Radeon™ FreeSync 2 monitors covering a wide range of prices, sizes, resolutions and features. This list grows weekly, and only a Radeon graphics card can provide the best gaming experience on these monitors.

 

 

If you aren’t convinced yet, I can only encourage you to try a Radeon FreeSync system yourself. At your friends’, at your retailer, during LAN parties. You won’t be disappointed. We also have a lot of work to do on our side to put this goodness in front of you. That’s why we’ve organized community events this month where you can experience what’s possible with the combination of Radeon FreeSync, an AMD Ryzen™ CPU, and the new Radeon™ RX Vega graphics card:

  • Budapest
  • Portland

It’s a great combo of the most amazing technologies available this summer. Come check it out if you are in the area!

 

We know that a lot of gamers upgrade their systems one component at a time. Graphics cards enjoy premium treatment as they traditionally offer the most direct benefit to gaming performance, but Radeon FreeSync changes this. Sometimes the best choice for you may be to upgrade your monitor first, and enjoy the Radeon FreeSync goodness on your current Radeon graphics card.

 

And that’s fine with us, because from now on your journey to smooth high quality gaming starts with the glass.

 

 

Damien Triolet, Technical Marketing Manager for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 08/24/17.]

 

Gamescom 2017 opened up to the public yesterday in Cologne, Germany and it’s been nothing short of amazing. Thousands of gamers from across the world are already flooding the halls to experience the latest and greatest in gaming.

 

AMD and HTC’s dazzling booth stands at the entrance of Hall 10.1. The booth is stocked full of beautiful hardware and unique PC builds that have you doing a double-take every time you pass. The In Win X-Frame stocked with the Radeon™ RX Vega 64 and the BIRD Customs casemod equipped with the Radeon™ RX 580 caught the eyes of many Gamescom attendees.

 

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We also showcased Quake Champions Special Edition PCs from Overclockers UK, Alza, Fierce PC, Caseking, ONE.de and Chillblast.

 

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Attendees were able to run benchmarks, play games and have some fun on AMD’s stage with League of Legends face-offs for prizes and free swag. On the HTC VIVE side of the booth is the opportunity to jump into some immersive VR, including Fallout 4 VR.

 

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Gamescom 2017 has only just begun and we can’t wait for it to get crazier with everything we love about gaming. We look forward to exploring the rest of the event and sharing it with you. Make sure you’re following us on Twitter for show floor updates!

 

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Daniel Skrba, Marketing and Communications Specialist for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 06/09/17.]

 

There are very few racing games as iconic as Dirt®. Fast-paced rally-car racing with sharp turns and split-second wins is always sure to get the adrenaline going. Add in nearly infinite race tracks due to procedurally generated stages, brand new sounds to immerse you in the audio and amazing visuals to make you feel like you’re in the driver’s seat, Dirt® 4™ is shaping up to be a classic. Radeon™ Software 17.6.1 pushes these visuals into high gear. Here is our performance at a glance:

 

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  • Up to 18% faster performance using Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.6.1 with Dirt 4 on the Radeon™ RX 580 (8GB) graphics card than with Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.5.2 with DirectX®11 at 1920×1080 (1080p)1.

 

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  • Up to 94% faster performance using Radeon Software 17.6.1 using Dirt 4 DirectX®11 on 8GB Radeon RX 580 multi-GPU than with 8GB Radeon RX 580 single-GPU at 2560×1440 (1440p) 2.

 

Download Radeon™ Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.6.1 today and experience the thrill of Dirt® 4™.

 

 

Gurman Singh, Software Product Marketing for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of June 8, 2017 on the 8GB Radeon RX 580 with Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.6.1 and Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.5.2, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 7700X CPU (4.2 GHz), 16GB DDR4-3000 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64 using the game Dirt 4 on the ultra settings at 8X MSAA. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 1920x1080, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.5.2 and 8GB Radeon RX 580 running Dirt 4 scored 52.6 FPS, and Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.6.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 580 scored 61.9 FPS, which is 18% faster performance. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-144
  2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of June 8, 2017 on the 8GB Radeon RX 580 in multi-GPU or 8GB Radeon RX 580 in single-GPU, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 7700X CPU (4.2 GHz), 16GB DDR4-3000 Mhz system memory, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.6.1 and Windows 10 x64 using the game Dirt 4 on the ultra settings at 8X MSAA. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 2560x1440, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.6.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 580 single-GPU running Prey scored 40.6 FPS, and Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.6.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 580 multi-GPU scored 78.5 FPS, which is 94% faster performance. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-145

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[Originally posted on 07/13/17.]

 

SS Rajamouli’s Baahubali 2: The Conclusion is the highest grossing Indian film of all time, but it also had a monumental global impact. Consider this: the film’s initial trailer is currently the 15th most viewed online trailer in history during its initial 24 hours, raking in 59.8 million views. By comparison, Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens pulled in 55 million views.

 

Once Baahubali 2: The Conclusion arrived in the United States, it landed at #3 in domestic box office totals. It actually surpassed The Circle, which boasted immense star power in the form of Tom Hanks and Emma Watson.

 

The Sword of Baahubali

 

When we first announced The Sword of Baahubali VR experience alongside our talented collaborators Arka Media Works, our ambition was — and is — to create the most exciting and photo-realistic virtual reality experience possible. To create an indelible adventure using the finest technology we can get our hands on. When the film it’s inspired by turned out to be a critically-acclaimed global phenomenon, we were overjoyed. And we are driven to expand the scope of our original vision to reflect the surging interest in this franchise.

 

Beyond just expanding our original vision, our team remains resolute in our desire to make The Sword of Baahubali VR experience one of the most compelling and captivating VR experiences to date.

 

This means pushing back the release of The Sword of Baahubali VR experience to Fall 2017, but we’re going to have some very exciting updates for you along the way. So stay tuned and thanks for joining us on this adventure!

 

 

James Knight is Visual Effects Director for AMD, based in Los Angeles, CA. James was Performance Capture Supervisor on Columbia Pictures’ The Amazing Spiderman. Additionally, he spent four years managing the motion capture for James Cameron’s Avatar. He has done Performance Capture and Virtual Production for films including I Am Legend, 2012, Hulk and Prince Caspian and various video games including, Batman Arkham City, Scene It, Star Wars: The Old Republic, and Project Gotham Racing. He is an active member of the Visual Effects Society (VES), and on the Board of Directors at the British Academy’s Los Angeles chapter (BAFTA-LA). James is also an Executive Member on the BAFTA VR Advisory Group.

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[Originally posted on 08/28/17.]

 

Gamescom 2017 is already over and we had an absolute blast being able to share it with gamers across the world. AMD’s booth was stocked with the latest systems powered by Radeon RX and AMD Ryzen. Outside of AMD’s booth was a whole world of upcoming gaming titles and immersive experiences.

 

We can’t wait for next year’s Gamescom 2018, but until then we have a photo gallery of this year’s event. For those that missed our event recaps, check them out below!

 

GAMESCOM 2017: DAY ONE

GAMESCOM 2017: DAY TWO

 

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Daniel Skrba, Marketing and Communications Specialist for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 09/01/17.]

 

They’re Radeon™ fans, they’re hardcore gamers and they’re enthusiast builders—and they’re the few lucky gamers who won a Radeon RX Vega and had one in their hands before anyone else.

 

From the massive Vega giveaway back in January and our RX Community Tour, four gamers opened their prize packages to see the glimmer of the silver-plated, liquid-cooled Radeon RX Vega 64.

 

We asked them how they felt about winning the Radeon RX Vega before the cards arrived at their doorstep, and they were eager to share their thoughts on the high-end graphics cards.

 

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“The possibilities are endless. Thanks to Vega I can play smoothly in 4K but that’s the obvious part. Then I can choose a 4K monitor much easier because of the FreeSync support. Another thing that I would never try without a proper card is VR but now I have a reason to do that. There are just so many things I could write about and more after I try it with my new build.” –Yan Buyko, Hungary

 

 

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“The most exciting thing about receiving a Radeon RX Vega card is being able to be a part of the technology wave that AMD has unleashed over the past few months. The disruption AMD is bringing to the video and computing arena brings much needed competition in both technology and pricing, it’s a great time to be an AMD fan.” –Breck Anderson, USA

 

 

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“I am extremely excited about not only FINALLY building a computer of my own, but also building one with incredible VR capabilities! We will have a fantastic GPU that will be viable for many years to come and I will never have to borrow a computer again for PDX LAN!” –Ashley Bocaniciu, USA

 

 

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“This is an amazing gift. I’m excited to new Radeon RX Vega graphics technology and performance. I can’t wait to unpack it. :)” –Mateusz Pokrywka, Poland

 

We love seeing gamers so thrilled. If you want to show off your rig, be sure to follow us on our social channels and tag us—we want to see your build!

 

FOLLOW RADEON

LIKE RADEON ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 10/10/17.]

 

Summary

 

THE HP OMEN 15 IS A PORTABLE GAMING MACHINE READY TO DELIVER SMOOTH E-SPORTS AND AAA GAMING STRAIGHT OUT OF THE BOX.

 

HP OMEN is back with the 2017 OMEN 15 gaming notebook featuring Radeon™ RX 550 graphics. With a beautiful aluminum and carbon fiber chassis, fully lit chiclet keyboard, and integrated Bang & Olufsen speakers, the OMEN 15 lets you bring a fantastic gaming experience anywhere you go.

 

Key Hardware Specs:

  • 15 Inch, 1080p Radeon FreeSync™ Display
  • Intel-i7 processor (7700HQ)
  • Radeon RX550 Graphics
  • 8GB of DDR4 Memory
  • 1TB HDD
  • 2.58 kg (5.68 lbs)

 

Build & Physical Features

 

The first thing I noticed when taking my OMEN 15 out of it’s box is the signature OMEN dual texture design and red accents. The lid is plated with brushed aluminum and carbon fiber panels, which are great for attracting a few head turns. With an absence of plastic parts, the build quality feels nice and solid. The dual fan exhausts at the back accentuate the OMEN 15’s aggressive look, making the notebook feel ready to take on anything that you throw in its way.

 

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Lifting up the lid of the laptop reveals a black and red chiclet keyboard with a full num pad surrounded by a black brushed aluminum surface. The WASD keys are highlighted in bright red. The keyboard has red backlit keys for all the keys except for WASD which have white backlights. I find this keyboard helpful when playing shooters, as I never have to fumble around much to get my fingers in the right position. I especially like the fact that the backlight on the keys also lights up the text on each individual key face instead of surrounding the square so that I have no problem distiguishing the letters in dimly lit environments.

 

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The notebook features a powerful set of Bang & Olufsen notebook speakers found on the front right and left corners of the notebook. The angular design of the notebook help direct more of the sound outwards as opposed to downwards like many other notebooks do. I was able to fill a small room with crisp and consistent sound at around 80% volume.

 

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Attached to the chassis with a large single hinge design is the 15.6’’ Full HD FreeSync display of the OMEN 15. This well-lit display shows great saturation, and it’s anti-glare finish allows it to be viewed at a wide variety of angles without washing out the colors. Screen tearing was non-existent during my gaming tests.

 

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In a bright indoor office environment, I used 80% brightness which still left additional headroom to push the display brighter when watching dark videos.

 

Using the laptop outside on a sunny day, I noticed that although the anti-glare screen works well, it isn’t perfect. I still felt that the display was losing some color consistency within the darker color palette, even after maxing out the brightness settings. Bright and colorful games like Overwatch and League of Legends are fine, but this display struggles a bit if you are planning on watching dark movies under the sun.

 

Cracking open the OMEN 15 was a little difficult, which gives some credit to the solid construction of the notebook. Once I removed the back plate, I immediately noticed a dual heat pipe design and 2 rear exhaust fans which provide sufficient cooling for the CPU and GPU. Although the fans are large, they are quiet enough to be inaudible most of the time. Taking up a large chunk of the laptops interior space is a hefty 70Wh battery, giving the OMEN 15 enough juice to handle those on-the-go gaming sessions.

 

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As for the ports offered by this notebook, OMEN 15 has you covered with all the essentials integrated into the sides. The USB-C port on the left side of the laptop is always nice to see in the ports suite. The Ethernet interface allows me to hook up a wired connection, which is vital for games where every millisecond of ping counts.

 

While we’re on the topic of internet connectivity, I’ll quickly mention the inclusion of the 802.11ac WiFi standard on the OMEN 15, allowing me to connect onto those 5 GHz internet bands that are becoming ever more popular. I never have to fight for WiFi bandwidth at the 2.4 GHz frequency, which is so important for reducing ping.

 

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Ports:

  • Power Connector
  • 3x USB 3.0 Type-A
  • Network Port
  • SD Slot
  • USB-C
  • Headphone and Microphone input
  • HDMI
  • Mini-DisplayPort

 

PERFORMANCE

 

Benchmarks and Gaming

 

All tests were done on the latest driver and plugged into the wall. I saw a 15-20% drop in gaming performance if the laptop was not plugged in. For all new laptops, I recommended updating to the latest driver for the best performance.

 

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The gaming experience is very smooth on the OMEN, consistently staying above 60 FPS for all the tested titles. It looks like this notebook is ready to play all of your AAA titles straight out of the box without a problem.

 

Synthetic

 

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Pretty decent gaming score, as expected of a dedicated gaming laptop like the OMEN 15. I’m pleasantly surprised to find that the Digital Content Creation score is higher than I thought it would be.

 

Boot Time

 

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To measure the speed of this system I measured boot time from power up to the time my cursor no longer showed the spinning icon. Admittedly, the boot time is on the slow side, and a lot of the blame can be pointed to the fact that this particular notebook I tested used a hard-drive as its storage device. If you want those lightning fast boot times, you should definitely consider getting an SSD.

 

Hard Drive

 

CrystalDisk Mark was used to measure Hard Drive Performance:

 

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Unsurprisingly, the long boot times are reflected in the poor disk read/write scores. Get. An. SSD.

 

Productivity

 

Discrete Radeon 550 graphics provided a significant performance uplift in Adobe Photoshop and Premiere.

 

I tested this by comparing the amount of time it takes to run a sequence of filters and effect in Adobe Photoshop (2017). A 4K image (300 dpi) was rotated 180 degrees, crystallized by a factor of 10, blurred using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix, sharpened using the Smart Sharpen tool and rotated again by 180 degrees.

 

On Adobe Premiere, I tested with a 30 second 1080p mp4 video. The clip was flipped vertically, lens distortion was applied, and then a blur using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix.

 

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BATTERY

 

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The battery life on the OMEN 15 was decent. The 70Wh battery powered the PCMark 8 Mainstream gaming test for 2 hours and 17 minutes. Idling with the screen on at 80% a comfortable indoor brightness resulted in a little more than 4 hours before auto shutdown.

 

Charge time was quick on the laptop. I fully drained the battery, plugged it in and within 1 hour and 40 minutes the battery was back to 100%.

 

CONCLUSION

 

Powered by the Radeon RX 550, the OMEN 15 is a laptop that is designed with the gamer in mind. The sleek red chiclet keyboard and the beautiful aluminum and carbon fiber paneling makes the OMEN 15 feel like a proper gaming laptop. Although the read/write speeds could be improved, the Radeon™ Freesync display paired with the Radeon RX 550 delivers smooth gameplay across a variety of E-Sports and AAA titles. OMEN 15 is a laptop balances portability and performance, allowing me to bring my games with me anywhere I go.

 

Buy Now:

 

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Detailed Specs

Radeon RX 550 Graphics
Boost Clock1287 MHz
Peak Performance1.65 TFLOPs
Memory Size2 GB GDDR5
Memory width128 bit
Effective Memory Speed6 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth96 GB/s

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[Originally posted on 02/03/17.]

 

We’ve talked a lot about the RX 460 lately, concentrating on using it as the building block for a surprisingly affordable AAA gaming PC. What’s not to love about a ~$100 graphics card that can handle everything from eSports to AAA shooters? Well, sometimes choice is great. But sometimes it’s paralyzing! So today we wanted to steer you toward an awesome feature at Hexus.net that guides you to the RX 460 variant that’s just right for you.

 

 

In their comparison, Hexus takes a deep dive into the following heavy-hitters:

 

Hexus does a terrific job rounding up crucial specs for each card — PCB length, build quality, cooling style, power requirements, notable extra features — and then puts each one through a battery of tests measuring gaming performance, temperature, noise, overclocking potential, and power consumption.

 

I also appreciate that their test bench reflects the kind of system most gamers interested in buying a Radeon RX 460 would own, versus using absurd amounts of RAM and a $1000 CPU.

 

So if you’re in the market for an affordable 1080p graphics card, check out their feature here, and let us know which one is your favorite!

 

 

Jason Evangelho, Sr. Technical Marketing Specialist for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 02/14/17.]

 

Rebellion has released the newest title in their acclaimed Sniper Elite series, Sniper Elite 4. Each mission can be completed differently as there are so many ways to get through a level. Whether you’re using traps, your sniper rifle or just being super stealthy, the game always feels fresh. Most importantly, the animation when getting a long distance snipe is incredible. As you shoot, the camera pans out to follow the trajectory of your bullet, making every shot feel impactful. The mechanics of the game are the main reason why I love this tactical shooter.

 

As much as I like the mechanics, the performance of this game really puts it together.

 

DirectX® 12 highlights several features supported in Sniper Elite 4, enhancing the experience from DirectX® 11:

 

Asynchronous Shaders—the Asynchronous Compute Engines in AMD’s GCN and Polaris architectures can submit commands without waiting for other tasks to complete. The result is vastly improved GPU efficiency that boosts graphics processing performance, helps reduce latency, and enables consistent frame rates.

 

Multi-GPU experiences have been redeveloped for DirectX® 12, pushing for greater utilization of each GPU in a multi-GPU configuration. AMD’s GCN and Polaris architectures lead with greater performance and scalability in multi-GPU DirectX® 12.

 

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  • Up to 24% faster performance using Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.2.1 using Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 on 8GB Radeon RX 480 graphics GPU than with DirectX®11.1

 

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  • Up to 100% faster performance using RSCE driver 17.2.1 using Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 on 8GB Radeon RX 480 multi-GPU than with 8GB Radeon RX 480 single-GPU.2

 

With an average of 60 FPS and up to perfect 2X multi-GPU scaling, this game performs like a dream. If you’re looking for an amazing tactical stealth shooter with a great PC experience, get Sniper Elite 4 and download Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.2.1 today!3

 

Make sure you’re following Radeon on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to keep up to date with game performances and Radeon news.

 

 

Gurman Singh, Software Product Marketing for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of February 8th, 2016 on the 8GB Radeon RX 480, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 5960X CPU (3.0 GHz), 16GB DDR4-2666 Mhz system memory, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.2.1 and Windows 10 x64 using the game Sniper Elite 4 on the ultra settings PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 2560x1440, Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition driver 17.2.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 480 running Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®11 scored 48.5 FPS and Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.2.1 running Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 scored 60.0 FPS, which is 24% faster performance. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-110
  2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of February 8th, 2017 on the 8GB Radeon RX 480 in multi-GPU or 8GB Radeon RX 480 in single-GPU, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 5960X CPU (3.0 GHz), 16GB DDR4-2666 Mhz system memory, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.2.1 and Windows 10 x64 using the game Sniper Elite 4 on the ultra settings PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 2560x1440, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.2.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 480 single-GPU running Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 scored 60 FPS, and Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.2.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 480 multi-GPU running Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 scored 120 FPS, which is 100% faster performance. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-111
  3. The Rebellion name and logo, the Sniper Elite name and logo and the Sniper Elite Eagle are trademarks of Rebellion and may be registered trademarks in certain countries. © 2017 Rebellion. All rights reserved. DirectX is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other jurisdications.
adam.kozak

Prey: Recommended Settings

Posted by adam.kozak Employee Oct 31, 2018

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[Originally posted on 05/04/17.]

 

Prey is the newest first person action adventure game from Arkane Studios, built upon a highly optimized version of CryEngine. Set aboard a space station in an alternate timeline, Prey is a beautiful, smooth running title, with some really cool shape-shifter effects, and an intriguing story line.

 

Arkane Studios have spent a lot of time working on the PC version of the game, and I’ve been lucky enough to be playing it for a while since it is the first title released under AMD’s large partnership deal announced earlier this year.

 

Performance looks great across most Radeon RX graphics cards, and with my Ryzen 5 1600X system, you can really push up the settings and resolution.

 

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To play this game at decent settings, the recommended requirements are:

  • OS: Windows 10 64bit
  • Processor: AMD FX 8350 or Intel Core i7 2600K or greater
  • Memory: 16 GB RAM
  • Video card: AMD Radeon R9 290 or greater

 

Testing was done after the basic tutorial and first major story twist occurs. I wanted to be able to see the shape shifters and integrate them into the testing.

 

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One thing to note is there are a wide variety of options for PC users, including a few different AA settings that can help push performance, if you really need it. For those of you with widescreen monitors and a RX 580 – this game runs really well. On my new Asus MQ34VQ (3440×1440), I was able to knock down the setting one level to HIGH and still get smooth framerates without FreeSync enabled. With FreeSync enabled, I was able to enjoy smooth gameplay by switching to Very High settings.

 

If you are looking for a few extra frame-rates, consider playing with Screen Space Directional Occlusion, and Screen Space Reflections in the Advanced Settings menu.

 

Here are the recommended settings for 60+ fps across the latest Radeon RX graphics cards.

 

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As always, update to the latest Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver HERE to take advantage of the latest optimizations for Radeon™ graphics cards.

 

 

Adam Kozak, Sr. Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 11/02/17.]

 

A few weeks ago, we sent out this tweet:

 

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Then, proud GPU owners’ photos came flooding in—and we went on a nostalgia trip with these “retro GPUs”. Some of them are only a few years old, but it’s still nice to look back at the cards that once seemed mint and brand-new.

 

Take a look the photos the owners sent of the cards they kept around.

 

@matteopey:

 

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Jarrod (@JarrodsTech)’s MSI R5870:

 

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Stefan (@Misel)’s Rage 128:

 

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Camilo (@MrFusterCluck)’s Sapphire HD 3850:

 

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@Beccdoor‘s HD 3870:

 

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Josh (@joshdalemon)’s HD 4850 Toxic:

 

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Richard (@schlegelrichard)’s MSI X850 XT:

 

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Harry (@cuttsharry123)’s HD 7990 and 9200:

 

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Emilio (@Emilio_ARG)’s HD 5770:

 

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Dave (@Leviathanprim3)’s Radeon 9550:

 

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Øyvind (@Mastromical)’s collection:

 

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Alexander (@grafptitsyn)’s Sapphire HD 4870:

 

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Clint (@Icebug)’s Mach 32:

 

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Stephen O’Brien (@TPJerematic)’s Sapphire HD 2600 Pro:

 

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*All photographs are property of the tagged owner and have been shared with us for this blog.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.