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32 Posts authored by: rhallock Employee

Ultrathin notebooks are incredibly popular with laptop buyers, and it’s easy to see why: they’re not that much larger or heavier than an actual paper notebook, and they often have great battery life. Today, AMD is making the Ultrathin experience even better with the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics—the world’s fastest processor for Ultrathin PCs!

 

Let’s look at the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, one of our powerful new processors.

 

CPU Performance

The first characteristic of a great processor is, of course, fast CPU cores. The AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon graphics is designed for ultrathin notebooks and offers elite performance in lightweight tasks (“1T” below), alongside absolutely dominant performance in more challenging workloads (“nT” below).1 Long story short: whether you’re clicking buttons, loading up on browser tabs, or running demanding creative apps, this kind of performance can help your notebook stay snappy.

 

See endnote 1 for details.

 

Graphics Performance

And as the world’s digital artists continuously offer richer and more engaging movies or games, you also need graphics processing cores that can rise to the occasion. The graphics core built right into the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U and Ryzen™ 5 2500U processors are absolute beasts in their classes, offering up to 2.6X the graphics performance of its peers.2

 

See endnote 2 for details.

 

 

In fact, the Radeon™ Vega graphics on the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, for example, is fast enough to play the latest games on a thin and light notebook. That’s good news for road warriors who just want to unwind with some light gaming after a long day of travel and meetings. Sure, a desktop PC or a gaming notebook could offer even more performance, but your back and shoulders might be less pleased after carrying one all day long! Plus, the gaming is smooth: the chart below has 95th percentile frame times of 30 FPS+.

 

See endnote 3 for details.

 

Energy Efficiency

We’ve calculated that our new processor is 5.86X more energy efficient  than processors we were making three years ago, but what does that really mean at the end of the day? It means that we’re aiming to give you up to twice the battery life of our previous-generation mobile chips.

 

In the chart below, VP9 playback represents YouTube, H.264 is used by major streaming services like Amazon and Netflix, and MobileMark 14 is a good proxy for continuously using your PC to do work or browse the web.  These are practical, everyday tasks that we want you to enjoy a lot longer with your new AMD Ryzen™ processor with Radeon™ graphics.

 

See endnote 5 for details.

 

Putting it all together

Today’s laptop customers are working, playing, and creating on the road. I’m one of those customers, too. Like you, I want a snappy PC, I want my data to be secure, and I want it to be a while before I need to find a plug. AMD heard you loud and clear, and we are confident the Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics is exactly what you’re looking for.

 

But, as they say: a picture is worth a thousand words.

 

See endnote 6 for details.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


FOOTNOTES:

  1. Based on AMD testing as of 9/25/2017. System configuration(s): AMD Reference Motherboard (Ryzen™ 7 2700U), Acer Spin 5 (8550U), HP ENVY X360 (7500U), 2x4GB DDR4-2400, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, 1920x1080. Intel Graphics Driver: 22.20.16.4691. AMD Graphics Driver: 23.20.768.9. Cinebench R15 1t/nT scores: 144/719 (2700U) vs. 159/498 (8550U) vs. 147/325 (7500U). Cinebench R15 1t scores vs. Ryzen™ 7 2700U Baseline of 144: 7500U = 102%, 8550U = 110%. Ryzen™ 7 2700U Cinebench R15 nT score of 719 is 221% of 7500U and 144% of 8550U. Different configurations may yield different results.
  2. Based on AMD testing as of 9/25/2017. Common system configurations for HP ENVY X360 systems, Acer Swift 3, and AMD Reference Platform: Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, 1920x1080; Intel Graphics Driver: 22.20.16.4691; AMD Ryzen™ mobile APU Graphics Driver: 23.20.768.9; AMD FX-9800P Graphics Driver: 22.19.662.4; AMD FX-9800P configured in HP ENVY X360 (1x8GB DDR4-2133). AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U configured in AMD reference platform (2x4GB DDR4-2400). Core i7-8550U configured in Acer Swift 3 (2x4GB DDR4-2400). Core i7-7500U configured in HP ENVY X360 (2x4GB DDR4-2400). GeForce 950M configured in Medion D17KHN (2x8GB DDR3-1600, Core i7-7500U, S11-256G-PHISON-SSD 256GB) – GeForce 950M results are from 3rd-party testing, available on the 3DMark® database at https://www.3dmark.com/spy/1115646 but results have not been verified by AMD. Graphics results measured with 3DMark® TimeSpy. Core i7-8550U score (350) is baseline 100%. Core i7-7500U score (377) is 107% of baseline. AMD FX-9800P score (400) is 114% of baseline. GeForce 950M with i7-7500U score (900) is 261% of baseline. AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U score (915) is 261% of baseline. Different configurations may yield different results.
  3. Based on AMD testing as of 9/25/2017. System configuration(s): HP ENVY X360, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, 2x4GB DDR4-2400, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, Graphics Driver: 17.30.1025, BIOS F11.
  4. Netflix, Amazon, and MobileMark brands used for informational purposes only. Absolutely no endorsement is implied.
  5. Based on AMD testing as of 10/11/2017. Battery life targets for the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Graphics assume a 50Wh battery, a fully power-optimized software/hardware solution stack, and the following system configuration: AMD Reference Platform, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, 2x4GB DDR4-2400, graphics driver 17.30.1025, Windows 10 x64 (1703). VP9 battery life improvement of 4.5 hours to 9.2 hours represents 2.04. Actual battery life may vary with system configuration.
  6. Based on internal AMD testing as of 10/08/2017. Common system configurations: Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, 2x4GB DDR4-2400, 1920x1080; Intel Graphics Driver: 22.20.16.4691; AMD Ryzen™ mobile APU Graphics Driver: 23.20.768.9; AMD Reference Platform (2700U); Acer Spin 5 (8550U). All scores listed in order of 2700U vs. 8550U, with 2700U set as the 100% baseline. “3D Graphics” defined as 3DMark TimeSpy (915/100% v. 350/38%); “Data Security” defined as TrueCrypt 7.1a 1GB AES (4.6GBps/100% v. 3.3GBps/72%); “I/O Performance” defined as geomean of the eight Crystal Diskmark storage scores (218/100% v. 229/105%); Content Creation defined as POV-Ray 3.7 (1402/100% v. 1101/79%); Productivity defined as PCMark 10 Extended (3102/100% v. 2533/82%); Power Efficiency defined as Cinebench R15 nT score divided by 15W nominal processor TDP: Cinebench R15 nT scores (719 v. 498), nT Score/15W (47.93/100% v. 33.2/69%). Results may vary with configuration and driver versions. RVM-23

At AMD, we believe that technology plays a pivotal role in building a healthy planet for ourselves and our children. We do our part with more efficient computing architectures, energy management technologies, and smart manufacturing processes. Such innovations are our bread and butter, but we thought we could do a little more…

 

So, in 2014, AMD set an ambitious goal: compared to our processors at the time, we wanted our processors with integrated GPUs to be 25X more energy efficient by 2020. We called the goal 25x20, and we have charted our progress towards the goal with each new mobile processor release.

 

Our 2015 and 2016 processors, the 6th Generation (“Carrizo”) and 7th Generation (“Bristol Ridge”) AMD A-Series APUs, were each ahead of pace to achieve the 25x20 goal. And today, we’re celebrating that our latest such processor—the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics—is also ahead of the curve!

 

In fact, we can put a number on it: 5.86X greater energy efficiency since “Kaveri” in 2014.1

 

 

Staying ahead of the trend line represents thousands of hours from our talented engineers. And for you, our potential customer, the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics represents a marvelous step forward for thin and light notebooks:

 

  • Its CPU performance is up to 3X faster than our 2016 notebook processor.2
  • Its GPU performance is up to 2.29X faster than our 2016 notebook processor.3
  • And it uses up to 58% less power while reaching those extraordinary speeds.4

 

That’s the magic formula giving our tiny little chip everything it needs to outrun its predecessor, stay ahead of schedule on meeting our 25x20 goal, and give you a powerfully portable experience. Ready to bring home efficient performance for yourself? Learn more about the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics today.

 


FOOTNOTES:

  1. Based on AMD internal testing as of 10/12/2017. Relative energy efficiency based on a 50:50 weighted average of CPU+GPU performance (variable “C”), as evaluated by Cinebench R15 nT and 3DMark 11 scores, divided by typical energy usage (variable “E”) as defined by: ETEC (Typical Energy Consumption for notebook computers), Energy Star Program Requirements Rev 6.1 10/2014. AMD “Kaveri” represents the baseline of 1.0X for CPU, GPU, and ETEC. AMD “Carrizo” efficiency 1.23C/0.35E=3.51X. AMD “Bristol Ridge” efficiency 1.36C/0.34E=3.97X. AMD “Raven Ridge” efficiency 2.56E/0.44E=5.86X. Scores in order of Cinebench R15 nT/3DMark 11 P Score: “Kaveri” 232/2142 (100%), “Carrizo” 277/2709 (123%), “Bristol Ridge” 279/3234 (136%), “Raven Ridge” 719/4315 (256%). Results may vary with configuration and driver versions. RVM-21
    "Kaveri""Carrizo""Bristol Ridge""Raven Ridge"
    AMD Reference Platform
    AMD FX-7600P
    2x4GB DDR3L-1600
    Crucial CT256M4SSD2
    Windows 8.1 x64 9600
    Graphics Driver 13.350.0.0
    1366x768
    AMD Reference Platform
    AMD FX-8800P
    2x2GB DDR3-1866
    Crucial CT256M550SSD1
    Windows 10 x64 10586
    Graphics Driver 21.19.137.514
    1366x768

    AMD Reference Platform
    AMD FX-9830P
    2x4GB DDR4-2133
    Crucial CT256M4SSD2

    Windows 10 x64 10586
    Graphics Driver 21.19.137.514
    1366x768

    AMD Reference Platform
    AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U
    2x4GB DDR4-2400
    Samsung 850 Pro SSD
    Windows 10 x64 1703
    Graphics Driver: 22.19.655.2
    1920x1080
  2. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 10/05/2017.  PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Performance may vary with driver versions.  AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U: AMD Reference, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U with Radeon™ Vega 10 Processor Graphics, 8GB DDR4-2400 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SATA SSD, Windows 10 Pro RS2, Graphics driver 23.20.768.9, 26-Sep-2017. AMD FX™ 9800P: HP 81AA, AMD FX™ 9800P with Radeon™ R7 Mobile Graphics, 8GB DDR4-2133 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SATA SSD, Windows 10 Pro RS2, Graphics driver 22.19.662.4, 19-Jul-2017. Cinebench R15 nT is used to simulate CPU performance; the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U scored 719, while the FX 9800P scored 240 for a benchmark score comparison of 719/240 = 3.00X or 200% more. RVM-16
  3. Testing by AMD Performance labs. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Performance may vary with driver versions.  AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U: AMD Reference, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U with Radeon™ Vega 10 Processor Graphics, 8GB DDR4-2400 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SATA SSD, Windows 10 Pro RS2, Graphics driver 23.20.768.9, 26-Sep-2017. AMD FX™ 9800P: HP 81AA, AMD FX™ 9800P with Radeon™ R7 Mobile Graphics, 8GB DDR4-2133 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SATA SSD, Windows 10 Pro RS2, Graphics driver 22.19.662.4, 19-Jul-20173DMark® Time Spy is used to simulate graphics performance; the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U scored 915, while the AMD FX™ 9800P scored 400 for a benchmark score comparison of 915/400 = 2.29X or 129% more performance. RVM-17
  4. Based on AMD testing as of 9/28/2017. System configuration(s): AMD Reference Motherboard (2700U), HP ENVY X360 (FX-9800P/”7th Gen APU”), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, 1920x1080. AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U Graphics Driver: 23.20.768.9. AMD FX-9800P Graphics Driver: 22.19.662.4. 1x8GB DDR4-2133 (AMD FX-9800P). 2x4GB DDR4-2400 (AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U). Power Consumption defined as joules of power consumed during a complete run of Cinebench R15 nT:  AMD FX™ 9800P = 3782 joules (100%) vs. AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U =1594J (58% less). Different configurations may yield different results RVM-25

Over the last few weeks, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor has cemented a place in the world as today’s ultimate solution for creators and enthusiasts. It’s easy to see why: scores of cores, piles of PCI Express® lanes, plus powerful quad-channel memory support. And, today, we’re making the best a little better with a beta release of free support for bootable NVMe RAID!

 

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS

NOTICE: Any user that has an existing SATA RAID config must back up the array’s data and break down the current array before proceeding with driver install and BIOS upgrade. Please see additional details in our knowledgebase article.

 

  1. Download the latest AMD RAIDXpert2 package to obtain the NVMe RAID driver and management software.
  2. Update the BIOS for your AMD X399-based motherboard to add BIOS support for NVMe RAID.
  3. Install two or more NVMe SSDs to your system.
  4. Create a new NVMe RAID array:
    1. Method A: …Using your motherboard’s firmware. There will be a new menu in your BIOS, or a new menu accessible with a hotkey during POST. This will vary by model.
    2. Method B: …using the AMD RAIDXpert2 software.
    3. Make sure your disks do not contain important data!
  5. Just enjoy! No hardware activation keys, license fees, or arbitrary SSD restrictions apply. It’s that simple.

 

AMD RAIDXpert2 is a Windows GUI to create and monitor NVMe RAID arrays like the 6-disk RAID0 array above. Arrays can also be created through new menus in your motherboard’s firmware.

 

WHAT’S THE PERFORMANCE LIKE?

In a word: wow. In our own performance testing, we’ve been seeing some blistering results from our test systems—a monstrous 21.2GB/s from six disks in RAID0! But RAID users know that scaling matters, too, and X399 NVMe RAID still looked great in our lab: 6.00X read scaling, and 5.38X write scaling, from one to six disks (see chart below).

 

Performance will naturally vary based on the model and quantity of SSDs you use, plus the test pattern of your benchmark, but it’s clear that our free NVMe RAID solution can scale and scale fast.

 

 

Testing conducted by AMD performance labs as of 9/18/2017. Test configuration: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 1950X, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (16-16-16-36), ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399, 1-6x Samsung 960 Pro NVMe SSD (512GB ea.), default BIOS settings, Windows® 10 x64 RS2, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (driver 385.41), RAID Writeback Cache ENABLED, RAID Read Cache DISABLED, Write Cache Buffer Flush DISABLED.

 

COMMON QUESTIONS

Q: Do I need to buy some sort of activation hardware or license to enable NVMe RAID on the AMD Threadripper platform?

A: No. You only need to follow the steps 1-5 outlined in this blog.

 

Q: Is your NVMe RAID solution bootable?

A: Yes. Create the RAID array with the RAID management menu(s) in your BIOS, then proceed with Windows installation. Please ensure that your system is in pure UEFI mode by installing Windows with Compatibility Support Module (CSM) disabled in your BIOS. You will also need the NVMe RAID driver on a flash drive, as the Windows installer will ask for it before your array can be detected.

 

Q: What RAID levels are supported?

A: RAID0 (striping), RAID1 (mirroring), RAID10 (striping with mirroring). Please note that RAID10 requires four or six NVMe devices by design.

 

Q: How many simultaneous SSDs can I run?

A: The AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platform supports up to seven simultaneous PCIe® devices without adapters. Provided you have one GPU in the system, this sets a practical limit for most users of six NVMe SSDs.

 

Q: How are the NVMe SSDs electrically connected to the system?

A: NVMe SSDs are connected to the system over the PCI Express® bus. These PCI Express lanes come directly from the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor, rather than being routed through a relatively narrow link from the chipset.

 

Q: What AMD chipsets are compatible with NVMe RAID?

A: The AMD X399 chipset is compatible with our free NVMe RAID solution.

 

Q: Is hotswap supported in RAID1 and RAID10 arrays?

A: Yes.

 

Q: When will the required BIOS update be available for my AMD X399-based motherboard?

A: Please check with your manufacturer for the latest updates. We expect all AMD X399 motherboards to be updated imminently, though the exact date(s) of availability will depend on the motherboard vendor’s QA schedule.

 

Q: Do all AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ CPUs and motherboards qualify for NVMe RAID support?

A: Yes.

 

Q: What operating systems are supported?

A: Windows® 10 x64 (build 1703) is supported at this time.

 

Q: Can I use any NVMe SSD with this update?

A: Yes.

 

Q: If I already have a RAID array of SATA disks, can I just upgrade my driver and BIOS to add NVMe RAID support?
A: In-place upgrades of the RAID driver are not supported at this time. Please back up your data and break down your array prior to installing an NVMe RAID-ready BIOS or driver. AMD recommends that users start fresh with a new NVMe RAID array and a new install of Windows. To this effect, our knowledgebase article offers standalone drivers suitable for placing onto a flash drive for the Windows installer.

By now, many enthusiasts know the story of AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors: powerful creative performance, smooth gaming, and an uncompromising platform with tons of ports and lanes. The award-winning Threadripper 1950X and Threadripper 1920X CPUs proved that AMD is serious about HEDT performance, and that disrupting the status quo still matters in the most elite PC segment.

 

However, it’s a basic economic truth that not every creative user is able to spend up to $999 on a powerful processor. That does not diminish their appetite for a full complement of PCI Express® lanes, or quad-channel memory, or a feature-rich motherboard. But it did get us thinking about how to make that goodness more accessible, and we built the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X processor to answer the call. It’s available starting today with a manufacturer-recommended price of $549 USD!

 

About the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X CPU

“Just choose a core count” has been our mantra summarizing the consistent feature set of the Threadripper family, and that extends to the Threadripper 1900X, which has a lot in common with its big brothers: boost clocks up to 4.0GHz, Extended Frequency Range (XFR) clocks up to 4.2GHz, quad channel DRAM support, 64 PCIe® lanes, and a 180W TDP. In fact, you can count the differences on one hand:

 

  • The Threadripper 1900X has a higher base clock at 3.8GHz
  • There’s 20MB of L2+L3 cache
  • It has 8 cores and 16 threads

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900XAMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920XAMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X
Cores/Threads

8/16

12/2416/32
CCX Configuration4+0 (Die0) / 4+0 (Die1)3+3 (Die0) / 3+3 (Die1)4+4 (Die0) / 4+4 (Die1)
L2 Cache Configuration512K per core (4MB total)512K per core (6MB total)512K per core (8MB total)
L3 Cache Configuration8MB per die (16MB total)16MB per die (32MB total)16MB per die (32MB total)
Base Frequency3.8GHz3.5GHz3.4GHz
All Cores Boost FrequencyUp to 3.9GHzUp to 3.7GHzUp to 3.7GHz
Boost FrequencyUp to 4.0GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.0GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.0GHz (4 cores)
XFR FrequencyUp to 4.2GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.2GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.2GHz (4 cores)
PCIe® Gen3 Lanes646464
DDR Channels444
ECC SupportYesYesYes
TDP180W180W180W

 

The Threadripper 1900X for Content Creators

During the launch of the AMD Ryzen™ 7 1800X processor in March, we were pleased to see how digital content creators (DCC) especially took to an 8-core CPU as the new normal. But we did hear feedback from some that more lanes and more memory channels would be the perfect complement to that kind of CPU. We could only smile coyly at the time, knowing that one day the Threadripper 1900X would exist to answer those needs to a T.  And here we are!

 

The Ryzen Threadripper 1900X processor represents a tip of the scales towards the DCC side, enabling new performance upside and scalability over our most powerful CPU in the mainstream AMD AM4 Platform. For example: anyone with a thirst for GPU acceleration—Blender cycles or V-Ray, anybody? —can pack up to seven PCIe x8 accelerators into the Threadripper platform! That kind of expansion just can’t be found in any other HEDT platform today.

 

See footnote #1 for complete test configuration.

 

The Threadripper 1900X for Gaming

When work is done and it’s time to play, the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X packs a punch in the gaming department. In fact, it’s in the ballpark with the 8-core AMD Ryzen 7 processors, which are still winning awards for their excellent gaming performance. Naturally, we still recommend an AMD Ryzen 7/5/3 processor for anyone that just wants to game, but the Threadripper 1900X comfortably holds its own when it’s time to win some chicken dinners after a hard day’s work.

 

See footnote #2 for complete test configuration.

 

The “Threadripper Experience”

At AMD, we put a lot of thought into what it means to own an ultra-high-end PC platform, and made it our mission to cram all that goodness into AMD Ryzen Threadripper processor and the AMD X399 Chipset:

 

  • Powerful multi-threaded creative performance beyond the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X
  • A fully-featured chipset (e.g. 60 usable PCIe® lanes)
  • Quad-channel DDR4 infrastructure
  • ECC memory support up to 512GB per DIMM slot
  • Smooth and comfortable gaming at the important 60/120/144Hz thresholds
  • A soldered heatspreader with an indium alloy TIM for optimal heat exchange to your cooler
  • Top-5% die selection for higher clockspeeds at lower voltages
  • Unlocked voltage and multipliers for overclocking3
  • Premium motherboards with 10-layer PCBs, robust VRMs, and extensive I/O
  • A diverse selection of coolers designed for Threadripper
  • Can we brag? Have you seen the packaging?

 

For creators who game, and gamers who create, it’s hard to do any better than that. And starting today at $549 USD SEP with the new Threadripper 1900X model, the uncompromising Threadripper platform has never been more accessible.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


 

Footnotes:

1. Testing by AMD performance labs as of 8/22/2017. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith X399 (1900X), Asus Crosshair VI Hero (1800X), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1900X), 2x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1800X), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 384.94), Windows® 10 RS2, AMD Ryzen™ Balanced Power Plan. Raw Scores (1900X vs. 1800X): Cinebench R15 (1743 vs. 1646), Handbrake (8m44s vs. 9m09s) lower is better, POV-Ray (3550 vs. 3404), Blender (50m vs. 49m30s) lower is better, 7-Zip (44186 vs. 43539), VeraCrypt 1GB AES (14.7 vs. 13.6), Adobe Premiere Pro CC (12m19s vs. 12m17s) lower is better. Performance may vary with latest drivers. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. RZN-75

2. Testing by AMD performance labs as of 8/22/2017. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith X399 (1900X), Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming5 (1800X), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1900X), 2x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1800X), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 384.94), Windows® 10 RS2, AMD Ryzen™ Balanced Power Plan. Testing results are an average of 5 runs. Performance may vary with latest drivers. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Performance may vary based on the graphics card.

3. WARNING: AMD processors, including chipsets, CPUs, APUs and GPUs (collectively and individually “AMD processor”), are intended to be operated only within their associated specifications and factory settings. Operating your AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings, including but not limited to the conducting of overclocking (including use of this overclocking software, even if such software has been directly or indirectly provided by AMD or an entity otherwise affiliated in any way with AMD), may damage your processor, affect the operation of your processor or the security features therein and/or lead to other problems, including but not limited to damage to your system components (including your motherboard and components thereon (e.g., memory)), system instabilities (e.g., data loss and corrupted images), reduction in system performance, shortened processor, system component and/or system life, and in extreme cases, total system failure. It is recommended that you save any important data before using the tool.  AMD does not provide support or service for issues or damages related to use of an AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings. You may also not receive support or service from your board or system manufacturer. Please make sure you have saved all important data before using this overclocking software. DAMAGES CAUSED BY USE OF YOUR AMD PROCESSOR OUTSIDE OF OFFICIAL AMD SPECIFICATIONS OR OUTSIDE OF FACTORY SETTINGS ARE NOT COVERED UNDER ANY AMD PRODUCT WARRANTY AND MAY NOT BE COVERED BY YOUR BOARD OR SYSTEM MANUFACTURER’S WARRANTY.

When creators with the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ CPU are done designing the world around us, it’s only natural that they’d want to kick back and play some games. Today I wanted to give you a brief look at what to expect with the 2560x1440 resolution that has proven so popular in this high-end segment.

 

Testing by AMD labs as of 7/27/2017. All results an average of five runs using “high” graphics presets. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399 (BIOS 0303), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, Windows® 10 x64 Creator’s Update, Ryzen Balanced Performance Plan.

 

A picture says a thousand words: the Threadripper platform effortlessly transitions into making quick work of graphically demanding games. In the workloads we tested, we saw average framerates around 60, 120, and 144 FPS, depending on the title. That’s a great experience for today’s 1440p displays!

 

Seeing this level of performance on graphically challenging games makes me happy, because I know that represents plenty of horsepower for games like CS:GO and Rocket League where raw framerates are king.

 

Introducing Game Mode

Making a hugely multi-core CPU that’s ready for gaming is a challenging effort, because most PC games are designed for the typical 4-8 core processor. When greater core counts enter the picture, things can get squirrelly: poor thread scheduling can reduce performance, or (more rarely) the game may simply not run at all. The Threadripper team at AMD spent a long time thinking about how we can help our customers avoid these scenarios altogether, and we call it Game Mode.

 

Game Mode is a new feature in AMD Ryzen™ Master  that reconfigures the platform in two key ways:

  • It temporarily disables half of the CPU cores, which turns the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X into an 8C16T device (like the AMD Ryzen™ 1800X) and the 1920X into a 6C12T device (like the AMD Ryzen™ 1600X). For the truly technical, this is a 4+4 CCX configuration on one die. This ensures the game encounters the number of cores it was truly designed to handle. Please note that Game Mode does not disable SMT.
  • We tell the OS to use a Local Mode (NUMA) memory, which keeps a game and its memory footprint inside one CPU die and the locally-connected DRAM. This minimizes several key latency points in the system, which most games love.

 

Together, these changes can make a big difference for the games that weren’t designed with a beastly 12-core or 16-core processor in mind! When you’re ready for heavy threaded workloads, switching back to “Creator Mode” in AMD Ryzen Master effortlessly reverts these changes.

 

See footnote.

 

Game On

From the beginning, we envisioned the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platform as a do-it-all powerhouse built for the enthusiasts with demanding workloads that span work and play. With the powerful “Zen” architecture, tons of compute, and AMD Ryzen Master to optimize gaming performance, we think we got the recipe right for these users. We can’t wait to see what you do with Threadripper!

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


FOOTNOTES:

Testing by AMD Performance labs as of July 22, 2017 on the following systems. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used.

 

System Configurations: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X processors on an ASUS ROG X399 Zenith Extreme motherboard. All systems equipped with 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD, Windows 10 RS2 operating system, Geforce TX 1080 Ti graphics adapter, Graphics driver 384.76 :: 7/22/2017.

 

The Threadripper 1950X achieved average frame rates as follows in the following games at 1080p: In Gears of War Ultimate High (DX12), an average frame rate of 104.8 in default UMA mode and 121.11 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (121.11/104.8=1.14 or 14%) in legacy game mode; In Fallout 4 (Ultra), an average frame rate of 60.08 in default UMA mode and 72.29 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (72.29/60.08=1.17 or 17%) in legacy game mode; In Hitman Absolution (Ultra), an average frame rate of 76.54 in default UMA mode and 84.92 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (84.92/76.54=1.10 or 10%) in legacy game mode.  In Call of Duty: Modern Warfare an average frame rate of 91.27 in default UMA mode and 146.25 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (91.27/146.25=1.38 or 38%) in legacy game mode.

 

On average, with a sampling of over 60 actual games and settings as detailed in 1950X_LGM_vs_Mission.xlxs, performance uplift with Legacy Game Mode enabled is about 5% over Creator Mode. RZN-70

When I was a young lad, the first PC I ever built with my own money used the sensational 1GHz “Thunderbird” AMD Athlon™, ASUS A7V motherboard, and a GeForce 2 GTS. It was funded with my little paper route delivering the Tribune newspaper in Royal Oak, MI. My family had played PC games since the 486 era, but that system felt like an ascension to something truly special. Through it, I fell in love with the hardware, rather than just using the hardware. Ten years later, chance would have it that I’d come full circle to begin work at AMD.

 

I’ve been a PC enthusiast for a long time, and there are few things I love more than a great new piece of hardware that stands heads and shoulders above its peers. I think most enthusiasts know that feeling. There’s just something exciting about looking at “the best,” plus it’s fun to marvel at a giant leap forward within one generation of hardware. And though I am certainly biased, that’s how I feel about the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platform with the new AMD X399 chipset.

 

The exhaustiveness of it all just makes me giddy:

  • 64 PCI Express® lanes
  • Quad-channel DDR4
  • Up to 2 native USB 3.1 Gen2 ports
  • Up to 14 USB 3.1 Gen1 ports
  • Up to 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Up to 16 SATA ports

 

That is a lot of connectivity. In fact, it’s enough for me to comfortably run quad GPU, 3TB of NVMe storage, every USB device in my house, every SATA drive I’ve ever owned… and still have room to spare.

 

ASRock X399 MotherboardASUS MotherboardGigabyte X399 Motherboard ImageMSI X399 Motherboard

ASRock X399 Taichi

ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme

GIGABYTE X399 AORUS Gaming 7

MSI X399 Gaming Pro Carbon AC

 

Motherboards with the AMD X399 chipset are just beautiful, too: premium materials, great cooling, nice layouts, high-end controllers, LED readouts, exhaustive BIOSes, and lots of headers for fans and RGB. Precisely what I want out of a motherboard!

 

And unlike the other guy, the AMD X399 doesn’t have a confusing matrix of lanes, ports, and memory channels that go dark if you buy the wrong CPU. You always get the same connectivity with AMD X399, regardless of what Threadripper CPU you buy. That’s what enthusiasts deserve when committing to an HEDT platform.

 

There are often times in this industry when “best” is a nebulous decision filled with what-ifs and “well, it depends.” It sure didn’t feel that way with my “Thunderbird” Athlon, and it’s hard not to feel the same way about X399 today. When it comes to ultimate PC platforms, nothing else comes close.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

Proverb: “Time is money.”

 

Few know this more acutely than the creator, whose compile or render times could take hours, days… or even weeks. Every minute spent watching a progress bar is another minute—another dollar—squandered. 3D artists, video editors, and software developers know this problem especially well. But those creators also know that a powerful CPU can claw back those precious minutes to get things done. And when it comes to chips that laugh in the face of sluggish progress bars, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor is the definitive choice.

 

 


See footnote for raw scores and system configuration.

 

And there’s the picture to prove it. If your job or hobby depends on creative workloads like physically-based rendering, raytracing, or video editing, then a Threadripper CPU is easily your best defense against the pokey progress bars that cost you time and money.

 

It’s that simple.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


 

Footnote:

Testing conducted by AMD performance labs as of 7/31/2017. System configurations: 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399 (AMD), ASUS ROG STRIX X299-E (Intel), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 385.12), Thermaltake Water 3.0 Riing RGB 280, Windows® 10 x64 Creator’s Update. Raw scores (7900X vs. 1920X vs. 1950X): POV-Ray [4565,4845,5971]; Adobe Premiere Pro CC [9m06s,9m34s,7m48s] with 4K60 to YouTube 2160p preset (lower is better); Handbrake [6m55s,6m35s,5m43s] with 4K30 to 1080p AppleTV3 preset (lower is better); 7-Zip [57893,59899,73444]; VeraCrypt 50MB AES [15.6,18.5,24.2]; Corona Photorealism [90 sec,89 sec,71 sec] (lower is better). All tests an average of five runs.

Hey, everyone! Preorders for the crazy powerful AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors went live on July 31, and those with a CPU on the way may be wondering what cooler to buy for the 4094-pin sTR4 socket on the AMD X399 motherboards. Well, my friends, wonder no longer!

 

It's super simple: included with every AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPU is a free mounting bracket that enables compatibility with a wide range of premium closed-loop liquid cooling (CLC) solutions. These beautiful CLCs will keep your new Threadripper chip nice and chilly, and we maintain a list of over 20 solutions that are compatible with the included bracket. We'll be updating the list regularly for you!

 

There are also cooling solutions on the way that do not use AMD's provided bracket, and those will be added to the official list over time as well. Before purchasing such a solution, verify with the manufacturer or retailer that the cooler includes out-of-box sTR4 support. Some coolers pre-date the Ryzen Threadripper CPU, and are receiving mid-production updates after a certain date to include the compatible mounting hardware.

 


 

UPDATE NOTICE: The contents of this blog update have been migrated to the official Threadripper thermal solutions page on AMD.com at 3:47 PM Central on 2 August, 2017.

The release of AGESA 1.0.0.6 to mobo makers has resulted in a wave of fresh BIOS updates, each one packed with tons of new options for tweaking and overclocking memory.1 With so many options at your disposal, some have understandably asked: “what are the optimal settings for games?” Never one to leave an overclocking question unanswered, our illustrious overclocker Sami Makinen took his ASUS Crosshair VI and AMD Ryzen™ 1700 CPU for a spin to find the fastest combination of settings in a few different tests.2

 

Before we dig into the data, here’s what we analyzed:

  • The impact of the new BankGroupSwap (BGS) BIOS option
  • Single-rank DIMMs vs. dual-rank DIMMs
  • Automatic sub-timings vs. manually-tweaked subtimings
  • Max frequency vs. lower frequency at tighter timings
  • Geardown Mode (GDM) on vs. off

 

Digging into geardown mode

 

Let’s start with the impact of Geardown Mode (GDM), as it’s easy to address.

 

GDM is enabled by default for memory speeds greater than DDR4-2667 per the DDR4 spec. GDM allows the RAM to use a clock that’s one half the true DRAM frequency for the purposes of latching (storing a value) on the memory’s command or address buses. This conservative latching can potentially allow for higher clockspeeds, broader compatibility, and better stability—good for the average user.

 

But what about overclockers?1 For overclockers, Geardown Mode will be noteworthy because it also tells the memory subsystem to "disregard" the command rate set in the BIOS. As 1T command rates can be beneficial (though tough to maintain) for performance, the chart below is really asking whether it’s useful to run GDM if the desired memory clockspeed can be achieved.  Spoiler alert: probably not.

 

 

Our data points indicate that Geardown Mode should be disabled for gaming if you can achieve your desired memory overclock with a 1T command rate. The opposite holds true if 1T CR proves too aggressive to reach your desired clockspeed--leaving Geardown Mode enabled may get you there. Finally, when it comes to GDM vs. 2T CR (not shown), specific memory throughput testing should be conducted as the balance of power will come down to your other memory timings.

 

BankGroupSwap

 

BankGroupSwap (BGS) is a new memory mapping option in AGESA 1.0.0.6 that alters how applications get assigned to physical locations within the memory modules; the goal of this knob is to optimize how memory requests are executed after taking DRAM architecture and your memory timings into account. The theory goes that toggling this setting can shift the balance of performance in favor of either games or synthetic apps.

 

Our data seems to bear this out: our games got a little faster with BGS off, while AIDA64 memory bandwidth was higher with BGS ON.

 

 

 

Single rank vs. dual rank DIMMs

 

In the BankGroupSwap section, we alluded to “single rank” memory modules; that may have left some people scratching their head. That’s not surprising: memory ranks are largely unknown, not to mention cryptic. Starting from the top, PC enthusiasts know that a stick of memory is a circuit board with various memory chips attached. But have you ever thought about how a PC talks to those memory chips? That’s where ranks come in.

 

A “rank” is a group of memory chips that receive read and write commands as a group. Some memory sticks have all of their memory chips in one group, and those are single rank (SR) DIMMs. Other memory sticks split their memory chips into two groups, and those are called dual rank (DR) DIMMs.

 

DR modules can often be a smidge faster thanks to a capability called “rank interleaving,” wherein the second memory rank can still perform work while the first is being refreshed for use. However, DR modules are often harder for a system to drive to high frequency, which is why most high-performance memory kits use multiple 4GB or 8GB SR memory sticks. The extra frequency achievable by the SR memory modules is often enough to overcome the small performance benefit of DR DIMMs, too.

 

You can often tell single and dual rank memory apart by looking at the product code, which might say 1Rx4 or 1Rx8 for single rank, or 2Rx4 or 2Rx8 for dual rank. And though you should always verify with spec sheet, it’s a decent shortcut to assume an 8GB DDR4 DIMM is single rank, whereas a 16GB DIMM is almost certainly dual rank.

 

As we finally come to the data, our results lend credence that—all things being equal—DR memory configurations are a touch faster than SR configs for the purposes of PC gaming. But all things aren’t equal when it comes to overclocking memory, and we’ll explore that in the conclusion.

 

 

Automatic timings vs. manual tuning

 

Every overclocker knows that memory runs on “timings,” which are various wait periods PC memory must make as it completes a full cycle of reading or writing data. Lowering the timing values (making them more aggressive) can yield better performance by shrinking the wait periods. However, timings that are too aggressive can easily lead to instability and memory corruption as the memory struggles to accurately read and write its own data.

 

Motherboards generally take on all the heavy lifting of setting the complicated list of memory timings through mechanisms like SPD and XMP. These timings are configured to balance the fussy triangle of performance, compatibility, and stability. But was there something being left on the table? Sami intervened to find out, and his results couldn’t be clearer: overclockers with the wherewithal to hand-tune their memory timings can extract notably better performance in the PC games we looked at. Some games might be less sensitive to memory timings, but these tasks seem to love it.

 


Full timings for DDR4-3200 “maxed”: tCL = 12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60Ω.

 

The ancient debate: frequency or timings?

 

Last, but not least, Sami set out to find whether it was tighter timings or higher clockspeeds that mattered most on the AMD Ryzen™ processor. Sami pushed this combination of hardware up to DDR4-3520, DDR4-3466 with tighter timings, and DDR4-3200 with the tightest timings that could be achieved while maintaining stability with Memtest.

 

The verdict: tighter timings won. DDR4-3200 with aggressive timing adjustments outperformed the looser timings needed to hit DDR4-3520, while 3466 clearly split the difference with the right balance of timings and frequency.

 


DDR4-3200 “maxed” settings: tCL =12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60Ω. DDR4-3466 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDR/W = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 28, ProcODT = 60Ω, CR = 1T, GDM = Disabled, BGS = Disabled. DDR4-3520 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDW/R = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 30, tRC = 56, tWR = 14, tWCL = 12, tRFC = 312, ProcODT = 53.3Ω.

 

Putting it all together

 

Now that we’ve picked through the data in isolation, we thought it would prove useful to take a mile-high view and draw some conclusions about what we found from our data set, and how that might impact gaming on the AMD AM4 platform.

 


DDR4-3200 “maxed” settings: tCL =12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60Ω. DDR4-3466 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDR/W = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 28, ProcODT = 60Ω, CR = 1T, GDM = Disabled, BGS = Disabled. DDR4-3520 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDW/R = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 30, tRC = 56, tWR = 14, tWCL = 12, tRFC = 312, ProcODT = 53.3Ω.

 

  • Conclusion #1: Dual rank DIMMs (yellow) offered the best performance amongst “set and forget” (light blue, orange, yellow) memory configured automatically by XMP profiles.
  • Conclusion #1a: But the increased overclocking headroom of single rank modules was more than enough to overpower the benefits of rank interleaving, so manually-tuned single rank DDR4-3200 and 3466 won the day (dark blue and green).
  • Conclusion #2: BankGroupSwap should likely be disabled for users that want the best PC gaming performance. As always, test your specific use case.
  • Conclusion #3: Chasing the highest possible clockspeed required timings so relaxed that real world performance suffered versus lower frequencies with tighter timings. This is a fine balance, however, so testing on your platform is always helpful.
  • Conclusion #4: Geardown Mode should likely be disabled if your overclock is stable with a 1T command rate. As always, test your specific use case.

 

We hope these insights prove useful, and we’re looking forward to your feedback. Chat with us on Twitter @AMDRyzen or leave a comment.

As we swing into the summer months, the steady stream of application updates for the AMD Ryzen™ processor continue to flow in. This month we’re turning our attention to Rise of the Tomb Raider™ and Pixologic ZBrush, which now integrate major performance updates in public builds.

 

Rise of the Tomb Raider Performance Patch

Rise of the Tomb Raider has risen to both critical acclaim and widespread use in benchmark suites on the back of its excellent gameplay and beautiful graphics. Starting in version 770.1 of the game (now on Steam™), those beautiful graphics are now a whole lot faster for AMD customers!

 

Below, we’ve plotted the performance for Rise of the Tomb Raider before and after the patch in 1080p resolution with the medium and high presets applied. We chose the medium preset to minimize the influence of the GPU, but even the more GPU-bound “high” preset yields a healthy uplift.

 


Testing conducted as of 6/6/2017. System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ 7 1800X Processor, 2x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), GeForce GTX 1080 (382.33 driver), Asus Crosshair VI (BIOS 9943), Windows® 10 x64 build 1607, 1920x1080 resolution.

 

With an impressive performance gain of ~28% across the medium and high presets, we chatted with Rise of the Tomb Raider developer Crystal Dynamics for insight into what was changed. Here’s what they had to say:

 

“Rise of the Tomb Raider splits rendering tasks to run on different threads,” Crystal Dynamics said. “By tuning the size of those tasks – breaking some up, allowing multicore CPUs to contribute in more cases, and combining some others, to reduce overheads in the scheduler – the game can more efficiently exploit extra threads on the host CPU.”

 

Another win for the powerful multi-threading capabilities of the Ryzen™ processor!

 

With that in the bag, Crystal Dynamics also found a way to reduce GPU driver overhead, saying: “An optimization was identified in texture management that improves the combination of AMD CPU and NVIDIA GPU.  Overhead was reduced by packing texture descriptor uploads into larger chunks.”

 

If you’re interested in testing for yourself, it’s easy to test pre-patch performance by popping open the betas tab and rolling back to v767.2.

 

 

 

Pixologic ZBrush Update

And for the creators amongst us, the latest version of ZBrush (4R8) offers a substantial performance update related to placing lights in the real-time viewport. Hold on tight, because this one is a doozy.

Testing conducted as of 6/6/2017. System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ 7 1800X Processor, 2x8GB DDR4-2400 (17-17-17-39), GeForce GTX 1080 (382.05 driver), AMD Ryzen™ Reference Motherboard, Windows® 10 x64 build 1607, 1920x1080 resolution.

 

Yes, my friends, our test results show that it is now a stunning 204,772% faster to throw down a light source in ZBrush version 4R8 with the AMD Ryzen™ processor. This routine operation has shrunk from an agonizing 22.5 seconds to a blistering 11 milliseconds.

 

Users will also find that basic UI operations, such as the accessing the “Draw” and “Light” menus, are altogether snappier.

 

Until next time

What are you interested in hearing more about in our next AMD Ryzen Community Update? Let us know on Twitter @AMDRyzen!

 



Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

Welcome to the fourth installment of the Ryzen Community Updates! If you’re checking into this series for the first time, this is where we let our community know about all the exciting updates that are on their way for the AMD Ryzen™ processor. We’ve covered a lot of ground in a short amount of time: game updates, new Windows® power plans, stability improvements, feature additions and much more. Today’s update is the one many of you have been most excited about: the AGESA that focuses on overclocked memory. There’s some great news for IOMMU/ACS users, too!

 

What is an “AGESA”?

AGESA is an acronym that stands for “AMD Generic Encapsulated System Architecture.” As a brief primer, the AGESA is responsible for initializing AMD x86-64 processors during boot time, acting as something of a “nucleus” for the BIOS for your motherboard. Motherboard vendors take the core capabilities of our AGESA updates and build on them with their own “secret sauce” to create the BIOS files you download and flash. Today, the BIOS files for AMD AM4 motherboards are largely based on AGESA version 1.0.0.4.

 

Beginning this month, as we promised to you, we began beta testing a new AGESA (v1.0.0.6) that is largely focused on aiding the stability of overclocked DRAM (>DDR4-2667). We are now at the point where that testing can begin transitioning into release candidate and/or production BIOSes for you to download. Depending on the QA/testing practices of your motherboard vendor, full BIOSes based on this code could be available for your motherboard starting in mid to late June. Some customers may already be in luck, however, as there are motherboards—like my Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming5 and ASUS Crosshair VI—that already have public betas.

 

Starting With Virtualization

If you’re the kind of user that just needs (or loves!) virtualization every day, then AGESA 1.0.0.6-based firmware will be a blessing for you thanks to fresh support for PCI Express® Access Control Services (ACS). ACS primarily enables support for manual assignment of PCIe® graphics cards within logical containers called “IOMMU groups.”  The hardware resources of an IOMMU group can then be dedicated to a virtual machine.

 

This capability is especially useful for users that want 3D-accelerated graphics inside a virtual machine. With ACS support, it is possible to split a 2-GPU system such that a host Linux® OS and a Windows VM both have a dedicated graphics cards. The virtual machine can access all the capabilities of the dedicated GPU, and run games inside the virtual machine at near-native performance.

 

This is certainly a complicated setup for most users, but I have no doubt that there will be a whole lot of you enthusiastically nodding at this news. We’re grateful for your feedback and your patience, and we hope the new support for ACS serves you well.

 

What's Next For Memory

AGESA 1.0.0.6 officially adds 26 new parameters that can improve the compatibility and reliability of DRAM, especially for memory that does not follow the industry-standard JEDEC specifications (e.g. faster than 2667, manual overclocking, or XMP2 profiles).

 

The following table spells out all the new parameters, and provides a few words on what they do. Keeping in mind that this is overclocking territory, manual or automated control of these parameters should nevertheless make it a little more straightforward to use DDR4-3200 modules—or faster if you have the talent!1


ParameterFunctionValues
Memory clocksAdded dividers for memory clocks up to DDR4-4000 without refclk adjustment. Please note that values greater than DDR4-2667 is overclocking. Your mileage may vary (as noted by our big overclocking warning at the end of this blog).133.33MT/s intervals (2667, 2933, 3067, 3200, 3333, 3466, 3600, 3733, 3866, 4000)
Command rate (CR)The amount of time, in cycles, between when a DRAM chip is selected and a command is executed. 2T CR can be very beneficial for stability with high memory clocks, or for 4-DIMM configurations.2T, 1T
ProcODT (CPU on-die termination)A resistance value, in ohms, that determines how a completed memory signal is terminated. Higher values can help stabilize higher data rates. Values in the range of 60-96 can prove helpful.Integer values (ohms)
tWCL/tWL/tCWLCAS Write Latency, or the amount of time it takes to write to the open memory bank. WCL is generally configured equal to CAS or CAS-1. This can be a significant timing for stability, and lower values often prove better.Integer values (cycles)
tRCRow cycle time, or the number of clock cycles required for a memory row to complete a full operational cycle. Lower values can notably improve performance, but should not be set lower than tRP+tRAS for stability reasons.Integer values (cycles)
tFAWFour activation window, or the time that must elapse before new memory banks can be activated after four ACTIVATE commands have been issued. Configured to a minumum 4x tRRD_S, but values >8x tRRD_S are often used for stability.Integer values (ns)
tWRWrite recovery time, or the time that must elapse between a valid write operation and the precharging of another bank. Higher values are often beneficial for stability, and values < 8 can quickly corrupt data stored in RAM.Integer values (ns)
CLDO_VDDP

Voltage for the DDR4 PHY on the SoC. Somewhat counterintuitively, lowering VDDP can often be more beneficial for stability than raising CLDO_VDDP. Advanced overclockers should also know that altering CLDO_VDDP can move or resolve memory holes. Small changes to VDDP can have a big effect, and VDDP cannot not be set to a value greater than VDIMM-0.1V (not to exceed 1.05V). A cold reboot is required if you alter this voltage.

 

Sidenote: pre-1.0.0.6 BIOSes may also have an entry labeled “VDDP” that alters the external voltage level sent to the CPU VDDP pins. This is not the same parameter as CLDO_VDDP in AGESA 1.0.0.6.

Integer values (V)
tRDWR / tWRRDRead-to-write and write-to-read latency, or the time that must elapse between issuing sequential read/write or write/read commands.Integer values (cycles)
tRDRD / tWRWRRead-to-read and write-to-write latency, or the time between sequential read or write requests (e.g. DIMM-to-DIMM, or across ranks). Lower values can significantly improve DRAM throughput, but high memory clocks often demand relaxed timings.Integer values (cycles)
Geardown ModeAllows the DRAM device to run off its internally-generated ½ rate clock for latching on the command or address buses. ON is the default for speeds greater than DDR4-2667, however the benefit of ON vs. OFF will vary from memory kit to memory kit. Enabling Geardown Mode will override your current command rate.On/Off
RttControls the performance of DRAM internal termination resistors during nominal, write, and park states.Nom(inal), WR(ite), and Park integers (ohms)
tMAWMaximum activation window, or the maximum number of times a DRAM row can be activated before adjacent memory rows must be refreshed to preserve data.Integer values (cycles)
tMACMaximum activate count, or the number of times a row is activated by the system before adjacent row refresh. Must be equal to or less than tMAW.Integer values (cycles)
tRFCRefresh cycle time, or the time it takes for the memory to read and re-write information to the same DRAM cell for the purposes of preserving information. This is typically a timing automatically derived from other values.Integer values (cycles)
tRFC2Refresh cycle time for double frequency (2x) mode.  This is typically a timing automatically derived from other values.Integer values (cycles)
tRFC4Refresh cycle time for quad frequency (4x) mode. This is typically a timing automatically derived from other values.Integer values (cycles)
tRRD_SActivate to activate delay (short), or the number of clock cycles between activate commands in a different bank group.Integer values (cycles)
tRRD_LActivate to activate delay (long), or the number of clock cycles between activate commands in the same bank group.Integer values (cycles)
tWRWrite recovery time, or the time that must elapse between a valid write operation and the precharging of another bank. Higher values are often better for stability.Integer values (ns)
tWTR_SWrite to read delay (short), or the time between a write transaction and read command on a different bank group.Integer values (cycles)
tWTR_LWrite to read delay (long), or the time between a write transaction and read command on the same bank group.Integer values (cycles)
tRTPRead to precharge time, or the number of clock cycles between a READ command to a row and a precharge command to the same rank.Integer values (cycles)
DRAM Power DownCan modestly save system power, at the expense of higher DRAM latency, by putting DRAM into a quiescent state after a period of inactivity.On/Off

 

Until next time

What are you interested in hearing more about in our next AMD Ryzen Community Update? Let us know on Twitter @AMDRyzen!

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


1. WARNING: Overclocking memory will void any applicable AMD product warranty, even if such overclocking is enabled via AMD hardware and/or software.  This may also void warranties offered by the system manufacturer or retailer or motherboard vendor.  Users assume all risks and liabilities that may arise out of overclocking memory, including, without limitation, failure of or damage to RAM/hardware, reduced system performance and/or data loss, corruption or vulnerability.  GD-112

After fleshing out an impressive selection of nearly 100 ATX and mATX AM4 motherboards, our motherboard partners have started to turn their attention to more specialized small-batch designs like the mini-ITX form factor. Prized for its “power-to-weight” ratio, the diminutive mITX form factor—just 170x170mm—can pack a lot of hardware into systems not much larger than a shoebox. That’s tantalizing potential for gamers like Darrell, who just put the finishing touches on a hot new ITX rig built around the flagship AMD Ryzen™ 7 1800X processor.

 

AMD: Tell us a little bit about yourself!
Darrell: Hey, I’m Darrell! I live in Portland, Oregon and I've always had a passion for technology. I'm currently working as a network and systems engineer. I've been building custom PC's for the last 10 years, and I’ve recently spent more time dedicated to the building process.

 

AMD: Every good PC needs some good games. What are you into right now?
Darrell: I love love LOVE my HTC VIVE. VR changes everything. Tilt Brush, Space Pirate Trainer and SUPERHOT are great in VR! Outside of VR, I also enjoy some old school Runescape, Hearthstone, GTA V, Doom, Path of Exile and some Overwatch.

 

AMD: I understand you’re running an ITX system with Ryzen now. Give us the specs!
Darrell: That’s right! I built a blue AMD PC. It’s a little unorthodox, but it has a peaceful “Zen” feel to it. It’s packing a Ryzen 7 1800X overclocked to 4GHz, Biostar X370GTN ITX mobo, 32GB DDR4-2933, 1TB Samsung 960 EVO NVMe SSD, a Corsair SF600 SFX power supply, and a Radeon R9 Nano overclocked to 1.1GHz. I built the system into an NCASE M1, and then watercooled it. Most of the watercooling components are made by EKWB and Bitspower. There’s more work to do, but I really enjoyed building it!

 

AMD: You recently switched to AMD, is that right? What convinced you?

Darrell: Yes, that’s right. I’ve been following Ryzen since it was announced, and when I learned the price for what this chip offers, I knew I had to have it. I upgraded from a Core i7-6700K. That’s a pretty high-end processor, but it didn’t do everything I needed it to. The 16 threads on my 1800X gives me peace of mind—I know that I won’t experience a bottleneck while streaming or working on other things while gaming.

 

AMD: Since you just switched to AMD, is there anything you found surprising/interesting/different?

Darrell: I’ve always been a fan of AMD GPUs, but this is my first AMD processor. I am extremely impressed by how much community outreach AMD has compared to the other guy. I feel as if I am part of a helpful community. I never got that from my 6700K.

 

AMD: Has Ryzen’s performance surprised you on any workloads?

Darrell: Yes, actually. In my line of work, I need to run multiple [virtual machines] alongside some compute-intensive workloads. I know my 1800X is significantly faster than any quad core CPU for this kind of work. I’ve especially noticed huge gains in x264 encoding while streaming and recording my gameplay. File decompression is noticeably faster, too.

 

AMD: Why was the ITX form factor so important to you?

Darrell: I need small form factor. I cannot even envision building a large PC. Living in Portland, I attend PDXLAN as often as possible. It’s so convenient to have a desktop’s worth of performance in a system that’s easy to carry around. And since I’m limited to this form factor, I take it as a challenge to put the most powerful components I can find into the system.

 

AMD: When choosing an ITX board, what features do you look for?

Darrell: I want at least six USB ports and an S/PDIF connector for my DAC/Amp. I also look for smart placement for front panel, power, and fan connectors so it’s easier to install a water cooling loop. Depending on my use case, I also look for robust power phases to support overclocking.

 

AMD: And what do you think about the BIOSTAR X370GTN?

Darrell: I’m pleasantly surprised. I purchased the X370GTN due it being the first ITX board to market. It’s impressive that this little brand can push out such an anticipated design ahead of the major motherboard makers. I had initially planned to upgrade to a different ITX board later on, but now I’m not so sure. This little thing works really well.

 


 

Wrap-up

With ITX motherboards like the BIOSTAR X370GTN now for sale for around $110 USD, the enthusiast’s dream of serious multi-core CPU performance in a tiny box is quickly becoming a reality. And we’re only just getting started: more ITX designs for the AMD Ryzen™ processor are on the way over the summer!

 

Special thanks to Darrell for taking some time out of his day to chat with us about his new build. You can see more of his rig in his Reddit posts on /r/AMD and on /r/Watercooling. And if you’ve built your own ITX Ryzen rig, share it with us on Twitter @AMDRyzen. We’ll occasionally feature the most incredible builds right here on the AMD community blog.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


 

VIVE is a trademark of HTC Corporation in the United States and other jurisdictions. No endorsement is implied.

 

WARNING: AMD processors, including chipsets, CPUs, APUs and GPUs (collectively and individually “AMD processor”), are intended to be operated only within their associated specifications and factory settings. Operating your AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings, including but not limited to the conducting of overclocking (including use of this overclocking software, even if such software has been directly or indirectly provided by AMD or an entity otherwise affiliated in any way with AMD), may damage your processor, affect the operation of your processor or the security features therein and/or lead to other problems, including but not limited to damage to your system components (including your motherboard and components thereon (e.g., memory)), system instabilities (e.g., data loss and corrupted images), reduction in system performance, shortened processor, system component and/or system life, and in extreme cases, total system failure. It is recommended that you save any important data before using the tool.  AMD does not provide support or service for issues or damages related to use of an AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings. You may also not receive support or service from your board or system manufacturer. Please make sure you have saved all important data before using this overclocking software. DAMAGES CAUSED BY USE OF YOUR AMD PROCESSOR OUTSIDE OF OFFICIAL AMD SPECIFICATIONS OR OUTSIDE OF FACTORY SETTINGS ARE NOT COVERED UNDER ANY AMD PRODUCT WARRANTY AND MAY NOT BE COVERED BY YOUR BOARD OR SYSTEM MANUFACTURER’S WARRANTY.

It’s been about a month since the AMD Ryzen™ 5 processors launched, and we’re celebrating that anniversary with a brief little roundup of the greatest things said about these award-winning chips.

 

A little bit about Ryzen 5

Let’s face it: almost all of us multi-task while gaming. Browsing Reddit is just too interesting. There’s 10 seconds of downtime you can fill with dank memes and cute cats! You might even have more than one monitor on your desk to feed this appetite… some of your friends probably ask you what you do with all of those monitors. It’s hard to explain. They don’t understand.

 

But you know that multi-tasking life! And that brings us to today’s topic: with six cores and 12 threads, or four cores and eight threads, Ryzen 5 processors are fantastic gaming CPUs with a little extra “oomph” on the side for all those times you need to do anything beyond gaming.

 

Those core and thread counts just aren’t offered by any other CPUs at the same prices, so the benefit to you is simple: great performance in creative apps; beastly game streaming; scalability for DirectX® 12 and Vulkan®; and threads to spare when you inevitably fire up a movie, browse the web, and hang out on Discord alongside your game.

 

Even if you’re just going to sit down and game, because you have the superhuman focus that I do not, the Ryzen 5 CPUs are more than ready for the challenge:


Testing by AMD Performance Analysis Labs as of 4/24/2017. All games evaluated at 1920x1080 with the “High” in-game preset. System config: ASRock AB350 Gaming K4 (AMD), ASRock B250 Gaming M3 (Intel), GeForce GTX 1080 (21.21.13.7878 driver), Windows® 10 x64 (Build 1607), 16GB DDR4-2933 (16-16-16-36).

 

You don’t have to take our word for it

As independent reviewers dug into the Ryzen 5 lineup, I think it would be fair to say that they were impressed with everything these affordable processors can offer.

  • Proving that extra cores and threads make a difference, TechRadar said: “The extra processing power of the Ryzen 5 1600X puts Intel’s processors to shame, including both its closest competitor and a much higher-spec Broadwell-E part.”
  • Asserting that Ryzen 5 is the definitive midrange CPU, PC World wrote: “[…] Ryzen 5 is the way to go. It burns Core i5 to the ground in multi-threaded applications performance and doesn’t give up much in single-threaded performance.”
  • Noting that the extra cores and threads are great for gaming and creating, CG Magazine wrote: “the Ryzen 5 1600X is releasing as one of the best CPU’s to cater to both gamers and content creators alike.”
  • Speaking directly to creators who deserve an affordable option, Digital Trends said: “Whether you’re encoding video, streaming and recording while gaming, or compressing and uncompressing large files, you’ll see a benefit from the extra cores…”

 

Now that you know a little more about how beloved these fantastic chips really are, perhaps your curiosity is piqued. Maybe your credit card has even started to tingle a little (mine did). “But Robert,” you ask with skeptical eyes, “how much will all this performance cost me?”

 

Not much! AMD Ryzen 5 processors are now available from your favorite online retailers starting at around $169 US for the 8-thread 1400 model and $219 for the 12-thread 1600 model.1 Though you can buy any AM4 motherboard you like, boards based on the AMD B350 chipset are a great option starting around $80 US.2

 

And if you still need a little more help: let Paul’s Hardware guide the way with this awesome $1000 AMD Ryzen 5 PC!

 

 

 


Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his/her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

1. AMD suggested electronic retailer pricing as of April 31, 2017.

2. Prices from Newegg.com as of April 31, 2017.

Hi, everyone! Starting this week, AMD Ryzen™ customers can download a new version of the AMD Ryzen Chipset Drivers (version 17.10).

 

This release is primarily intended to make good on our promise to include the AMD Ryzen Balanced power plan in the chipset driver package. The 17.10 (or later) driver release will automatically install and activate the AMD Ryzen Balanced as a fourth power plan (shown below). This driver package is exclusively designed for systems with Windows 10 x64 and the AMD Ryzen CPU.

 

 

What does this power plan do?

The AMD Ryzen Balanced power plan allows your AMD Ryzen processor to more quickly raise clockspeeds. The plan also prevents your CPU cores from being "parked," an idle state that can negatively impact the performance of many (but not all) games. If you're interested in additional details, our original blog on the topic has lots more to offer.

 

In parallel, you should also pay a visit to LegitReviews' testing on the AMD Ryzen Balanced power plan. Nathan Kirsch noted "6-7 percent performance gains when gaming at both 1080P and 1440P screen resolutions" in a couple games, plus lots of test results for you to pore over. Thanks, Nate!


Until next time

As always, we sincerely appreciate the time you took to test the standalone plan and provide feedback on installation and usage. With your help, our final build should gracefully install for any user that previously installed (or attempted to install) the standalone plan.

Hey, Ryzen fans! Today we’re back with our third community update, once again focusing on several key topics you asked us to look at: power plans, game performance updates, and temperature monitoring software!

 

Balanced power plan optimized for AMD Ryzen™ processors


4/26/2017 Update:
The AMD Ryzen Balanced Power Plan is now included in the official AMD chipset drivers starting with version 17.10! Simply download and install the latest chipset driver package, and the new plan will be automatically configured for you. Windows 10 64-bit is required.

 

Throughout the launch of the AMD Ryzen™ processor, AMD has been clear that desktop PC customers should choose the “High Performance” power plan in Windows® 10. The reason is clear: testing conducted by AMD, and independent reviewers (e.g. Hardware.fr and Computerbase), have concluded that the High Performance power plan offers appreciable performance benefits to our customers. But the out-of-the-box power plan for Windows 10 is “Balanced,” so the community challenged us to find a compromise. We took that challenge seriously, committed to finding a solution by the first week of April, and today we believe we have the answer.

 

A little background is needed

AMD Ryzen processors feature AMD SenseMI technology, a sophisticated package of sensing and adapting features that (amongst other capabilities) allow the underlying microarchitecture to rapidly execute fine adjustments to voltage and frequency for peak performance. These changes can occur as quickly as 1 millisecond on an AMD Ryzen CPU. However, this intended functionality depends on the integrated power management in Ryzen being in absolute control. After all, nothing knows the hardware better than the hardware itself!

 

Transitions between frequencies and voltages are governed by “P-States.” P-states are frequency/voltage combinations requested by the operating system. Processors receive these requests all the time, and act on them by selecting matching states built into the hardware.

 

The Windows-default Balanced plan, in the interest of balancing power and performance, sets higher thresholds and longer timers for transitions into faster P-states than the High Performance plan. This can sometimes limit how quickly our processor responds to “go faster” promptings from high-demand applications.

 

Secondly, the default Balanced plan attempts to park all logical processors beyond the first 10% whenever possible. On an 8C16T AMD Ryzen 7 1800X, for example, logical processor 0 (physical core) and logical processor 1 (SMT core) stay awake, while the remaining 14 logical processors can be parked at any time. Resuming from a parked state has a latency cost that can affect performance, too.

 

The AMD Ryzen Balanced power plan

Because of these findings, the new AMD Ryzen Balanced power plan reduces the timers and thresholds for P-state transitions to improve clockspeed ramping. This lets the hardware take full control more often. We’ve also disabled core parking for more wakeful cores. As you can see in the chart below, the performance gains can be substantial—on par with the High Performance plan, in fact!

 


Testing conducted as of April 4, 2017. System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ 7 1800X, Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming5, 2x8GB DDR4-2933, GeForce GTX 1080 (378.92 driver), Windows 10 x64 (build 1607).

 

Other games that we’ve seen benefit from the new plan include: Total War™: WARHAMMER, Alien: Isolation™, Crysis™ 3, Gears of War™ 4, Battlefield™ 4, Project Cars™ and more. Though not every game behaves in a way where a change in power plans has an impact on the AMD Ryzen™ processor, we’ve long maintained that there are enough games to warrant a change. Today’s findings put a fine point on that, and we’re very excited to get these changes into the hands of our customers starting today!

 

Installation is simple: just install the latest AMD chipset drivers for Windows 10 64-bit!

 

 

After collecting feedback from this community preview, we intend to roll the final power plan into the AMD Chipset drivers for AMD Ryzen processors. The Ryzen Balanced plan will automatically be configured as the default power plan for Ryzen-based Windows 10 PCs. If you’ve already downloaded and installed our new power plan from this blog, the new chipset driver package will ensure you do not encounter duplicate entries.

 

Update @ 4/26/2017: The AMD Ryzen Balanced Power Plan is now included in the AMD Chipset Driver package starting with version 17.10. Simply download and install the bundle on Windows 10 x64, and everything will be taken care of automatically!

 

What about power?

Now that you know a little more about the performance of our new plan, let’s talk power. The AMD Ryzen Balanced power plan does not change how our processor handles low-power idle states called “CC-States.” These CC-States number cc1 through cc6, representing increasingly aggressive clock and power gating. In fact, cc6 represents a core that is essentially turned off. The core is sleeping so deeply that only its voltage can be detected by software.

 

The sophisticated power management technology in the “Zen” core can autonomously enter and exit these CC-States as quickly as 1ms. Software tools, unable to see through the sleep, will simply report the last P-state known to the OS before the core entered a CC-state. Don’t be alarmed! The effective frequency of a sleeping core is much lower (generally sub-1GHz).

 

In short:

 

  1. The AMD Ryzen™ Balanced power plan still permits aggressive power management. There should be little difference between the OEM Balanced and the Ryzen Balanced plan. We’re interested in your feedback!
  2. Performance of the AMD Ryzen™ Balanced power plan should be on par with the High Performance plan. We're interested in your feedback on this, too.
  3. Finally, if you see a third-party tool reporting “idle” clocks in the range of 3200-3400MHz, you can be virtually certain that the core is actually sleeping and the tool is simply reporting the last known P-State.

 

We’re very proud of the fast and granular power management in the “Zen” architecture, and we hope these explanations helps you better understand how our all-new processor functions.

 

Even more 1080p game performance updates

In our last community update, we brought you word of significant performance uplifts in Ashes of the Singularity™ and minimum framerate improvements in DOTA™ 2. Today we’re excited to share word of AMD Ryzen™ optimizations now available in Total War™: WARHAMMER with the game’s new “Bretonnia” patch—now available on Steam™!

 

The March 27th Bretonnia update helps the underlying game engine better understand the topology of Ryzen with respect to the number of logical vs. physical cores. Overall, this helps Total War: WARHAMMER better schedule threads on the processor to reduce resource contention.

 

Thanks to the great work from our friends over at Creative Assembly™ and SEGA®, we saw an uplift of up to 10.5% with the “High” preset and up to 7% with the more GPU-bound “UItra” graphics preset.

 

Testing conducted as of April 4, 2017. System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ 7 1800X, Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming5, 2x8GB DDR4-2933, GeForce GTX 1080 (378.92 driver), Windows 10 x64 (build 1607), 1920x1080 resolution.

 

An important update for AMD Ryzen Master

If you’ve not heard of AMD Ryzen Master, it’s a neat little tool we built for users to monitor and overclocking their Ryzen-based computer.1  You get real-time access to temperatures and fan speeds, memory timings, core voltage, and CPU frequencies, plus easy switchable profiles. Super convenient!

 

Image result for amd ryzen master

 

Today we’re pleased to announce that Ryzen Master version 1.0.1 will be available starting April 11th with two important updates:

 

  1. Ryzen Master now reports junction temperature, rather than tCTL, by automatically removing the tCTL offset on the AMD Ryzen 1800X, 1700X, and 1600X processors. See the “temperature reporting” section of this blog for more context on tCTL.
  2. The installer no longer enables or requires HPET when Ryzen Master is installed with a system running an AGESA 1.0.0.4-based BIOS. See the “let’s talk BIOS updates” section of this blog for more context on AGESA 1.0.0.4.

 

Until next time

What are you interested in hearing more about in our next AMD Ryzen Community Update? Let us know on Twitter @AMDRyzen!

 

 



Robert Hallock
is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.


Footnotes:

1. WARNING: AMD processors, including chipsets, CPUs, APUs and GPUs (collectively and individually “AMD processor”), are intended to be operated only within their associated specifications and factory settings. Operating your AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings, including but not limited to the conducting of overclocking (including use of this overclocking software, even if such software has been directly or indirectly provided by AMD or an entity otherwise affiliated in any way with AMD), may damage your processor, affect the operation of your processor or the security features therein and/or lead to other problems, including but not limited to damage to your system components (including your motherboard and components thereon (e.g., memory)), system instabilities (e.g., data loss and corrupted images), reduction in system performance, shortened processor, system component and/or system life, and in extreme cases, total system failure. It is recommended that you save any important data before using the tool.  AMD does not provide support or service for issues or damages related to use of an AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings. You may also not receive support or service from your board or system manufacturer. Please make sure you have saved all important data before using this overclocking software. DAMAGES CAUSED BY USE OF YOUR AMD PROCESSOR OUTSIDE OF OFFICIAL AMD SPECIFICATIONS OR OUTSIDE OF FACTORY SETTINGS ARE NOT COVERED UNDER ANY AMD PRODUCT WARRANTY AND MAY NOT BE COVERED BY YOUR BOARD OR SYSTEM MANUFACTURER’S WARRANTY.