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38 Posts authored by: rhallock Employee

From the size of a credit card to the size of a small refrigerator, today’s PCs come in all shapes and sizes. Some of those PCs just do homework, while others help us understand the mysteries of the cosmos. And it goes without saying that you can buy a PC for practically any price, too. The point is: there’s a lot of choice out there. Which one is right for you?

 

Digging through all those choices to find the right one can be a hassle. But it doesn’t have to be. A computer powered by the reimagined AMD Athlon™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics can be the perfect all ‘rounder: snappy, quiet, reliable, and ready to handle work or play.

 

AMD Athlon processors have been trusted for nearly 20 years to enable a satisfying experience in computers used by families, offices, and anyone else who just needs an affordable and uncomplicated PC that gets things done. This year, we redesigned Athlon with 2018 technologies to make it better than ever, and you can experience it for yourself starting September 18th with the AMD Athlon 200GE CPU.

 

So, what makes the AMD Athlon 200GE so great? Let's take a look.

 

Picture1.pngAMD “Zen” Architecture

Every automobile has a motor that was thoughtfully designed over many years by hundreds of engineers, and every processor has an architecture. Ours is called “Zen.” The AMD Athlon processor with the “Zen” architecture was built according to high-performance design principles that will help you avoid unwanted lag, slowdowns, freezes, or sluggishness in the latest applications.

 

Radeon™ Vega Graphics

Smooth scrolling in a browser, quick editing of photos, a responsive user interface in Windows®, and fluid video playback are just some of the graphically rich things we expect our PCs to do these days. Such tasks require a strong graphics processor, and AMD Athlon has one inside: the Radeon Vega graphics processor. Athlon’s Radeon Vega graphics naturally breeze through the tasks you expect, but it truly shines when asked for more: like playing modern PC games enjoyed by 150,000,000 other gamers!1 The AMD Athlon 200GE processor represents an affordable and performant way to start with top games like DOTA® 2, League of Legends™, Overwatch™, or CS: GO™.

 

Reliability and Security

Current market research suggests that the average consumer will own a PC for about 4.5 years before considering an upgrade. Consumers need a PC filled with trusted components ready for the years ahead. At AMD, we’re doing our part with the Athlon™ processor.

 

Cool and Quiet: The 2018 AMD Athlon processor is five years in the making, with an eco-focused design that enables responsive performance with very little energy usage. That low energy usage can help your PC run cooler and quieter, giving you a reliability edge.

 

Security Features: AMD Athlon™ Processors support security-first technologies like AMD Enhanced Virus Protection (EVP), Windows® Defender Antivirus, and Windows® Secure Boot to shrink your PC’s exposure to viruses and malicious applications. These “peace of mind” capabilities block certain types of harmful programs at the source to transparently enable a more secure operating environment from the moment you start your system.

 

Get AMD Athlon™ Today

If you need an affordable and modern PC for your kid, the family, a home theater, or a small office, you can a get a leg up on that build starting September 18th with the AMD Athlon™ 200GE Processor and an AMD A320-based motherboard for around $100 USD at your favorite PC parts retailer.2  But if you’re not comfortable building your own PC, that’s okay: affordable pre-built systems with the AMD Athlon 200GE are on the way, too.

 

Regardless of what you choose, the AMD Athlon Processor with Radeon Vega Graphics will bring 2018’s best technologies to your PC with plenty of performance to handle work or play.

 

Learn more at amd.com/athlon

 


 

Robert Hallock is a senior technical marketing guy for AMD's Processor division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

Footnotes:

1. 12.6 million players for DOTA® 2, 100 million players for League of Legends™ via SUPERDATA “Market Brief – 2017 Digital Games & Interactive Media Year In Review”. Rocket League™ player count of 40 million users via official Rocket League Twitter account.

2. AMD Athlon 200GE SEP of $55 USD, plus AMD A320 motherboard starting at $49.99 on Newegg.com and Amazon.com, as of 8/23/2018.

Precision Boost Overdrive (PBO) is a powerful new feature of the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ CPUs.1 Much like traditional overclocking, PBO is designed to improve multithreaded performance. But unlike traditional overclocking, Precision Boost Overdrive preserves all the automated intelligence built into a smart CPU like Ryzen: Precision Boost 2 remains enabled for on-demand performance, XFR 2 still enables higher performance with better cooling, and the CPU still lowers clocks and voltages to save power at idle. As you can see, Precision Boost Overdrive is sort of a “best of all worlds” approach to overclocking that manual mode usually doesn’t offer. But how does PBO work? Let’s find out in three easy steps.

 

Step 1: What Controls Boost

All 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen-branded Processors use Precision Boost 2, which intelligently leverages a large network of sensors built into the CPU to determine whether it’s okay to boost. These sensors measure and react in a very fast loop: up to 1000 times per second. Though there are many data points being measured, the most important are:

 

  • SoC Power (“PPT Limit”): measured in watts, the amount of power the CPU can draw before boost levels off
  • VRM Current (“TDC Limit”): measured in amps, the amount of current we let the motherboard deliver to the CPU before boost levels off
  • Temp (°C): measured in degrees Celsius, the temperature the CPU can reach before boost levels off

 

If the sensors detect that the CPU isn’t close to one of these limits, Precision Boost 2 sees opportunity to raise clockspeeds on as many cores as it can.

 

It is useful to imagine these three thresholds (“platform limits”) as a triangle, shown below, where the labeled corners are something like the RPM redline on your car. Inside of that, a safer and more reliable triangle that represents the factory configuration of your CPU.

 

Figure 1: Precision Boost 2 leverages extra thermal and electrical capacity to enable higher performance. The CPU’s factory configuration is aggressive, without pushing the CPU to the red line in power or temperatures.

 

 

Step 2: More Room to Play

If the size of the imaginary triangle largely determines whether or not the CPU can boost, what if the triangle were simply larger? In the previous diagram, you may have noticed that there’s some empty space between the factory CPU configuration and the platform limits. That empty space is what users are filling up when they overclock their CPU, and it’s the same space the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPU consumes when PBO is enabled. Let’s see how that new triangle might look!

 

Figure 2: Precision Boost Overdrive gives Precision Boost 2 more "room to play" before pulling back on boost. More cores, more frequency, more often!

 

 

As you can see, the PPT and TDC Limits have been embiggened to let the platform draw more power. That extra power is directly converted into higher average clockspeeds on more cores for a longer period of time. PBO even communicates with your motherboard to understand how much extra VRM current capacity (TDC) it can provide!

 

Step 3: The Benefits of Precision Boost Overdrive

By now we know that Precision Boost Overdrive unleashes a more aggressive version of Precision Boost 2 that preserves the smart frequency and voltage management that users like. The performance upside for PBO can be significant: up to 13% more multithread performance!2 That’s not dissimilar to what a user might gain with manual overclocking, but PBO can accomplish it at the touch of a button in the latest version of AMD Ryzen™ Master.

 

 

Precision Boost Overdrive: A Smarter Way to Overclock

Taking your feedback seriously is a critical objective for us, as is using the Ryzen CPU's intelligence in new and beneficial ways. We knew we could bring those two goals together with Precision Boost Overdrive! The result is awesome: a new type of overclocking that combines smart boost control, idle power savings, factory max boost clock, and higher nT performance. We hope you enjoy!

 


Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

Footnotes:

1. Precision Boost Overdrive requires a 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper processor with AMD X399 chipset motherboard. Because Precision Boost Overdrive enables operation of the processor outside of specifications and in excess of factory settings, use of the feature invalidates the AMD product warranty and may also void warranties offered by the system manufacturer or retailer. GD-128

2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/16/2018. “Multithread performance” defined as Cinebench R15 nT. Results presented in order of Precision Boost Overdrive OFF vs. ON: 5096 vs. 5795 (%13 faster). AMD System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2990WX, Enermax 360 CLC @ 20°C ambient temperature, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), Asus Zenith X399 Extreme (BIOS 0008), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD. Results may vary with system configuration. Precision Boost Overdrive requires a 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper processor with AMD X399 chipset motherboard. Because Precision Boost Overdrive enables operation of the processor outside of specifications and in excess of factory settings, use of the feature invalidates the AMD product warranty and may also void warranties offered by the system manufacturer or retailer. 

From the beginning, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor was designed for the world’s fastest and most premium desktop systems. But it also started small: a small skunkworks team of enthusiasts at AMD believed that the users of such systems needed and wanted more than an 8-core AMD Ryzen CPU. The rest is legend. The pace of progress for AMD—and the HEDT market—since that little idea has been breathtaking.

 

Where 10 cores once cost $1723 USD (Core i7-6950X), the 1st Gen Ryzen Threadripper CPU delivered 16 cores at half the cost (a 2.5X price/perf leap in one generation).1  It was also the world’s first 16-core HEDT processor, and we challenged our competitor to step it up. Where PCIe® lanes once pointlessly varied with the CPU in the socket, Threadripper made an always-on 64 lanes table stakes. All of that fed into phenomenal acclaim: Ryzen and Threadripper collected 550+ industry awards and accolades.

 

Now it’s time for the best HEDT CPU to have a sequel: the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processor. It’s the biggest, heaviest, fastest desktop processor 2018 technology can build.2,3,4  And today you can learn about two exciting new models:

 

 

Threadripper X Series Processors & Customers

Dovetailing off last year’s success in the 16-core market, the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X is the crucial “missing link” for customers who create by day and game by night. With 16 cores and 32 threads, plus new technologies like Precision Boost 2 and AMD StoreMI technology, Threadripper X Series CPUs stand strong in gaming while flying through creative workloads up to 41% faster than the competition.5

 

Threadripper WX Series Processors & Customers

New for 2018: Some customers want to double down on their content creation performance to tear through their work as quickly as state-of-the-art technology will allow. Time is money, after all. Those users are Threadripper WX Series customers. Whether it’s 3D rendering, media encoding, or cinema mastering, the first-of-its-kind 64-thread architecture of the Threadripper WX Series is a specialized weapon that makes even the biggest projects seem smaller than ever. In fact, it’s up to 51% faster than its more expensive competitor!6

 

Together, the 2018 Ryzen Threadripper X and WX Series CPUs set the standard for performance, flexibility, features, and value for gamers and creators shopping in the HEDT market. And lest I forget: they’re drop-in compatible with any AMD X399 motherboard, tapping into an awesome ecosystem of great hardware. That’s HEDT done right!

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX

TDP180W250W
Core Count16 Cores, 32 Threads32 Cores, 64 Threads
Topology8 Cores ea. in Dies 0,18 Cores ea. in Dies 0,1,2,3
L2 Cache512K Per Core (8MB Total)512K Per Core (16MB Total)
L3 Cache16MB Per Die (32MB Total)16MB Per Die (64MB Total)
Base Frequency3.5GHz3.0GHz
Boost Frequency4.4GHz4.2GHz
PCIe Gen3 Lanes64 (4x reserved for chipset)64 (4x reserved for chipset)
Memory ChannelsQuadQuad
Extended Frequency Range 2 (XFR2)EnabledEnabled
Precision Boost 2EnabledEnabled
Precision Boost Overdrive (OC)7AvailableAvailable
Transistor Count~9.6 Billion~19.2 Billion
Die Size(s)2x 213mm24x 213mm2
AMD Suggested Online Price$899 USD$1799 USD

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

Footnotes:

1. Testing by AMD performance labs as of June 27, 2018. Performance per dollar evaluated by dividing the Cinebench R15 nT multithread score by the $USD SEP of the processor. I7-6950X: 2061/$1723 = 1.2 per $ (100% baseline). 1950X: 3042/$999 =  3.0 per $ (150% or 2.5X faster). Intel pricing via ark.intel.com as of 7/24/2018. Intel results obtained from official Cinebench R15 benchmark database on 7/24/2018, results not verified by AMD: https://us.rebusfarm.net/en/tempbench?view=benchmark / https://us.rebusfarm.net/images/benchmarks/1466540143_438.jpg. AMD System Configuration: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X, Asus ROG Zenith X399, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Samsung 960 EVO SSD, Windows 10 x64 RS3. Results may vary with system configuration and drivers. RPM-24

2. AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors are AMD’s largest desktop processors, with external dimensions of 3.1”x 2.2” x 0.25”. Intel’s largest desktop processors, the Core i9 series, have external dimensions of 2.1” x 1.8” x 0.2”, smaller than the AMD Ryzen Threadripper in every dimension. FP2-4

3. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 6/26/2018 on the following system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. Test configuration: AMD ‘Whitehaven’ X399 Socket sTR4 Motherboard + AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2990WX + Gigabyte X299 AORUS Gasming9 + Core i9-7980XE. Both systems feature GeForce GTX 1080 (driver 24.21.13.9793), 4x8GB DDR4-3200, Windows 10 x64 Pro (RS3), Samsung 850 Pro SSD. "Power” defined as computational processing power as represented by the Cinebench R15 processor benchmark The Core i9-7980XE achieved an average of 3335.2 points in the benchmark, while the Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX achieved an average of 5099.3, or (5099.3/3335.2=153%) 53% faster than the Intel Core i9-7980XE. RP2-1.

4. AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors are AMD’s heaviest desktop processors, with a weight of 136 grams. Intel’s heaviest desktop processors, the Core i9 series, weigh 52 grams., which is lighter than the AMD Ryzen Threadripper. FP2-5

5. Performance testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/16/2018. “Multithread” performance defined as Cinebench R15 nT. “Single thread” performance defined as Cinebench R15 1T. Cinebench R15 nT Results: 7900X vs. 2950X: 2183 vs. 3092 (+41% faster); 7900X vs. 1950X: 2183 vs. 3022 (38% faster); 1950X vs. 2950X: 3022 vs. 3092 (1.6% faster). Cinebench R15 1T results: 7900X vs. 2950X: 188 vs. 177 (5.8% slower); 7900X vs. 1950X: 188 vs. 167 (11% slower); 1950X vs. 2950X: 167 vs. 177 (6% faster). AMD System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2950X and 1950X, Corsair H100i CLC, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), Asus Zenith X399 Extreme (BIOS 0008), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD. Intel System Configuration: Core i9-7900X, Asus PRIME X299-Deluxe (BIOS 1401), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD. Results may vary with system configuration and drivers. RP2-6

6. Performance testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/16/2018. “Multithread” performance defined as Cinebench R15 nT. “Single thread” performance defined as Cinebench R15 1T. Cinebench R15 nT Results: 7980XE vs. 2990WX: 3365 vs. 5089 (51% faster). Cinebench R15 1T results: 7980XE vs. 2990WX: 183 vs. 175 (4.3% slower). AMD System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2990WX, Corsair H100i CLC, 4x16GB DDR4-2667 (16-18-18), Asus Zenith X399 Extreme (BIOS 0008), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD.  =Intel System Configuration: Core i9-7980XE, Asus PRIME X299-Deluxe (BIOS 1401), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD. Results may vary with system configuration and drivers. RP2-9

7. Precision Boost Overdrive requires a 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper processor with AMD X399 chipset motherboard. Because Precision Boost Overdrive enables operation of the processor outside of specifications and in excess of factory settings, use of the feature invalidates the AMD product warranty and may also void warranties offered by the system manufacturer or retailer. GD-128

As an enthusiast, I keep a shortlist of must-haves when it’s time to buy a new processor.

 

  • I want exceptional gaming performance with my 1440p monitors
  • I don’t want a processor that’s only good at gaming: video encoding, streaming, and number crunching (SimC, for example) are important to me
  • And I want a fully-featured platform that feels thoughtfully designed for people like me

 

The list is short and sweet, but few processors in PC history have risen to the occasion. I upgrade to the ones that do! As I sit here and consider my next upgrade, I’m lucky to have an inside scoop: the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Processors—especially the AMD Ryzen 7 2700X—easily ticks all the boxes.

 

I’ve seen that with my own eyes over the last few months, and I want to share my experiences with you.

 

Gaming Performance

 

At home, I have two rigs:

 

  • A Radeon™ Vega64 GPU with a Nixeus NX-EDG27 (2560x1440 + 144Hz Radeon FreeSync™)
  • A GeForce GTX 1080 with an Alienware AW3418DW (3440x1440 + 120Hz G-SYNC)

 

That kind of hardware shows you that gaming performance is what matters most to me. So, when I objectively consider the results from an AMD Ryzen 7 2700X versus the Core i7-8700K on a system like mine, the performance is virtually identical. In fact, across the 12 games you see below, the average difference is only 1%.1 I play Overwatch regularly, and I just (finally!) started Rise of the Tomb Raider, so I know the Ryzen 7 2700X will enable the gaming performance I want on the high-end hardware that I already have.

 

Click to enlarge image. Results may vary with system configuration.

 

Non-Gaming Performance

 

However, gaming is not the only type of performance that matters to me. I occasionally (and badly) try my hand at 3D rendering, I do some streaming for Sea of Thieves and Rocket League, and I run gear combo simulations for World of Warcraft with the Simulationcraft tool. These tasks benefit from cores and threads, and oftentimes they take a long time to run, so every second saved can really add up over the course of a week.

 

The Ryzen 7 2700X shines with this kind of work, dominating the 8700K by an average of 21%.2  That adds up to a lot of seconds.

 

Click to enlarge image. Results may vary with system configuration.

 

A Thoughtful Platform

 

A PC is so much more than the processor, though! The drivers, the motherboard, the chipset, overclocking, and cooling all play a hugely influential role in my overall satisfaction with the PC. Here are a few of the things that make me especially happy about the 2nd Gen Ryzen CPUs:

 

wraith.png

  • Every 2nd Gen Ryzen processor comes with a nice cooler in the box, and the Ryzen 7 2700X includes with the new Wraith Prism. The Prism is quiet, has three different RGB lighting areas, and has healthy overclocking headroom. The 8700K doesn’t come with a cooler at all.

  • The heatspreader is soldered to the processor die with an indium alloy. This reduces CPU temps by 10-15°C, which enables a cooler and quieter PC, if not more overclocking headroom—great for an enthusiast chip.  The 8700K still uses an inferior thermal paste.

  • Socket AM4, used by Ryzen CPUs, is now compatible with four entirely different AMD processor families, plus a plan for forward compatibility until 2020! That gives me a clear and confident upgrade path that doesn’t include being forced to buy a new motherboard if I don’t want to. That makes my life easier: I’ll upgrade one of my PCs to a new mobo based on the new AMD X470 chipset, and the other PC will re-use the fantastic ASUS ROG Crosshair VI HERO I bought last year—there’s already a BIOS for 2nd Gen Ryzen CPUs! There’s zero evidence right now that Socket 1151 for the Core i7-8700K will be so upgradeable.

  • Every Ryzen processor is unlocked for overclocking.3 Though the 8700K is unlocked as well, most of the 8th Gen Core processors are not, and that’s not a business practice I want to reward with my hard-earned money.

  • I have a large Steam®/Origin™ library that, due to its size, must be stored on a hard drive. With AMD StoreMI technology, I can fuse that hard drive to a 256GB SSD to get my HDD’s capacity running at SSD-like speed. Very large SSDs are still expensive, so now I can get capacity and performance at a much more reasonable price.

 

The Ultimate Processor for Enthusiasts Like Me

 

As I said at the beginning of this blog, I am an enthusiast with three simple criteria: great gaming performance, great everything-else performance, and a helpful platform. My time with the Ryzen 7 2700X processor made it crystal clear that it’s the enthusiast processor in the market that checks every box.

 

And for the surprising price of $329 US SEP, the deal is sealed. The Ryzen 7 2700X is the next CPU for my PCs. Will you join me?

 

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See more worldwide retailers for 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen

 


 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

Footnotes:

  1. As measured by AMD Performance Labs on 03/14/2018. All games tested at 2560x1440 resolution with the in-game “High” image quality presets. Results ordered in AMD vs. Intel (Relative%):  Grand Theft Auto™ V: 98 vs. 104 (-5%); Metro: Last Light™ Redux: 161 vs. 142 (+13%); Ashes of the Singularity™: 87 vs. 89 (-2%); Deus Ex: Mankind Divided™: 72 vs. 72 (Tie); Sid Meier's Civilization® VI: 89 vs. 98 (-9%); F1® 2017: 127 vs. 137 (-7%); Middle-earth™: Shadow of War™: 84 vs. 85 (-1%); HITMAN® (2016): 89 vs. 90 (-2%); Overwatch™: 130 vs. 134 (-3%); The Witcher™ 3: 83 vs. 85 (-2%); Tom Clancy's The Division™: 95.5 vs. 95 (Tie); Rise of the Tomb Raider™: 113 vs. 113 (Tie); Average of all percentages: -1%. Test configuration: Reference Motherboard + AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700X, Gigabyte AORUS Z370 + Core i7-8700K, GeForce GTX 1080 (driver 390.77), 2x8 GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), Windows 10 x64 Pro (RS3), Samsung 850 Pro SSD.  Performance may vary with different drivers and system configurations. RZ2-8
  2. As measured by AMD Performance Labs on 03/12/2018. Application Scores (AMD vs. Intel): Cinebench R15 (“video editing”): 1373 v. 1020 or 26% faster; Blender 2.79 (“3D rendering”): 29.40 seconds vs. 35.28 seconds or 17% faster; Handbrake 1.0.7 (“video encoding”): 662 seconds vs. 785 seconds or 16% faster; TrueCrypt 1GB AES (“file encryption”): 8.3 vs. 5.5 or 34% faster; POVRay 3.7 nT (“raytracing”): 2799 vs. 2506 or 10% faster. Average of all percentages (“content creation”): 20% more for AMD Ryzen™ 5 2600X. Test configuration: Reference Motherboard + AMD Ryzen™ 5 2600X, Gigabyte AORUS Z370 + Core i5-8600K, GeForce GTX 1080 (driver 390.77), 2x8 GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), Windows 10 x64 Pro (RS3), Samsung 850 Pro SSD.  Performance may vary with different drivers and system configurations. RZ2-5
  3. AMD product warranty does not cover damages caused by overclocking, even when overclocking is enabled via AMD hardware. Overclocking requires motherboard support.

FACT #1: They’re a new type of Ryzen Processor

To date, all AMD Ryzen™ processors for desktop PCs have been pure CPUs. In other words: they must be paired with a standalone AMD Radeon™ or GeForce graphics card. But the new AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics is a bit different: graphics are built right in! You can simply plug your monitor into a compatible motherboard and go—no graphics card needed. The included Radeon Vega graphics are ideal for compact or affordable systems, where system size or budgets may not allow for a standalone graphics card.

 

vega.png

 

FACT #2: There are two models to choose from

You can pick from the AMD Ryzen™ 5 2400G or Ryzen™ 3 2200G, with suggested $US prices of $169 and $99, respectively. That’s right: you can get a quad core Ryzen Processor with Radeon Vega graphics starting at just 99 bucks!

 

AMD Ryzen 5 2400GAMD Ryzen 3 2200G
CPU Cores4 Cores, 8 Threads (1 CCX)4 Cores, 4 Threads (1 CCX)
CPU Base Clock3.6GHz3.5GHz
CPU Max Boost ClockUp to 3.9GHzUp to 3.7GHz
CPU L1 Cache64K I$, 32K D$ per core64K I$, 32K D$ per core
L2+L3 Cache6MB6MB
GPU Cores

11 Radeon Vega Cores (704 ALUs)

8 Radeon Vega Cores (512 ALUs)

GPU ClockUp to 1250MHzUp to 1100MHz
GPU TMU Count4432
GPU ROP Count16 (32-bit)16 (32-bit)
GPU ACE/HWS Count4/24/2
Total FP32 TFLOPS1.99 (1.76 GPU/0.231 CPU)1.35 (1.126 GPU/0.224 CPU)
PCIe Gen3 Lanes8x GPU / 4x General / 4x Chipset Link8x GPU / 4x General / 4x Chipset Link
TDP65W65W
DRAM SupportUp to DDR4-2933 (Dual Channel)Up to DDR4-2933 (Dual Channel)
Die Size and Transistors209.78mm2 / ~4.94 billion

 

FACT #3: Speaking of motherboards, it’s easy to find one

AMD believes in maintaining a stable CPU socket for as long as possible. It helps extend the life of your motherboard purchase, giving you opportunities to upgrade down the line. Socket AM4 for the AMD Ryzen processor is no different: We have been working with our motherboard partners to release software updates for existing motherboards that add support for the Ryzen 3 2200G and Ryzen 5 2400G. In fact, most motherboards should already be compatible. But, if your motherboard still needs the update, it’s dead simple to get it!

 

FACT #4: They have the fastest graphics ever built into a desktop processor1

AMD has been building processors with built-in graphics since 2011, but this is our fastest yet! For users thinking about building an affordable gaming system, for example, the AMD Ryzen™ 5 2400G is a good way to start. It can easily tackle popular games like DOTA™ 2, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim®, CS:GO™, or Rocket League™. And if you find that you’d like to upgrade to a faster standalone GPU some time later, you can do that! And before I forget: the built-in graphics have full support for DirectX® 12 and Vulkan®, too.2

 

The Radeon Vega 11 graphics core in the AMD Ryzen 2400G

 

FACT #5: They open new opportunities for AMD

According to a recent report by Jon Peddie Research (JPR), about 30% of all desktop computers do not use a standalone graphics card. These PCs only ship with processors that have graphics built in, and they go to some pretty big markets: family computers, all-in-ones, small businesses, governments, enterprise workplace PCs, affordable gaming machines, small form factor machines, and more. These tantalizing opportunities are now open to AMD Ryzen thanks to the AMD Ryzen Desktop Processor with Radeon Vega Graphics!

 

FACT #6: Everything is unlocked for overclocking

Many of us working on the AMD Ryzen project love to overclock, and we’ve long felt it was only right to leave every AMD Ryzen Processor unlocked for tinkering. The new Ryzen 5 2400G and Ryzen 3 2200G processors are no different: fully unlocked CPU, GPU, memory, and voltage.3 As an added perk, these new CPUs are efficient 65W models, whereas most Socket AM4 motherboards can handle up to 95W (and then some); that’s some free headroom you can use to test your overclocking chops.

 

FACT #7: They are the first step in a larger family

In the spring of 2018, AMD plans to release a full family of AMD Ryzen 2000 Series processors, but they say you gotta start somewhere. For now, the AMD Ryzen 5 2400G is designed to replace the Ryzen 5 1400 at the same price ($169 USD). Correspondingly, Ryzen 3 2200G is designed to replace Ryzen 3 1200 at an even better price ($99 vs. $109). Core counts and thread counts are the same from old to new, but the 2200G and 2400G do have higher clockspeeds, better boost, and a graphics core that can comfortably game! More performance and features for your money is a pretty sweet deal! (And if you’re curious, the processors we’re planning for later this spring are “pure CPUs” for enthusiasts that prefer fast standalone graphics cards.)

 

FACT #8: They have a cool new boost algorithm

When we design a new Ryzen processor, we build in a little bit of intelligent self-awareness called AMD SenseMI technology. With AMD SenseMI, the processor is aware of its own temperature, and aware of how how much power is being drawn from the motherboard. If the processor knows it’s operating within safe tolerances, then the processor also knows it’s safe to dial up the clockspeed for more performance! We call that Precision Boost. The AMD Ryzen Processor with Radeon Vega Graphics features Precision Boost 2, which lets Precision Boost work more aggressively, on more CPU cores, more often. You can learn a lot more about Precision Boost 2 in this blog post, but the key takeaway is that Precision Boost 2 is more effective than its predecessor and a major new feature in the 2200G and 2400G.

 

 

 

FACT #9: Radeon Vega graphics are awesome for entertainment

You’ve already seen that the 2200G and 2400G can comfortably play games, but games are not the only thing a graphics core can do. People also watch movies and TV shows from all different sources on many different types of monitors. The Radeon Vega graphics built into these new processors handle H.264, HEVC, and VP9 fully in the hardware for smooth, cool, and quiet playback. In other words: services like Amazon Instant Video, Hulu, Netflix, and YouTube are all handled by dedicated hardware inside our new processor.4 And when it comes to monitors, Radeon Vega graphics can handle any display up to 4K UltraHD, even if you also throw in High Dynamic Range (HDR) and Radeon FreeSync technology.5

 

FACT #10: You don’t need to be an expert to overclock

Not everyone is familiar with the BIOS, much less overclocking from the BIOS. That’s okay! If you still want to give performance tuning on the 2400G and 2200G a shake, we have just the tool for you: AMD Ryzen Master. This is a Windows-based application that gives you full control over the CPU clock speeds, GPU clock speeds, memory clock speeds (and voltages for all). AMD Ryzen Master makes it super simple to try your hand at overclocking right from the desktop, and monitor your hardware while you do it.3 Easy!

 

 

Summary

With “Zen” and “Vega” technologies now available under $100, great entertainment, the latest technologies, and a snappy PC are all readily available to a folks that can really benefit: everyday people who just need to get things done and have a little fun gaming on the side. And when their aspirations grow, the AM4 Platform can come along with support for multiple GPUs and Ryzen processors with up to 8 cores and 16 threads. If you’re just getting into PCs or looking for something affordable and durable, the AMD Ryzen Processor with Radeon Vega Graphics is your ticket to ride.

 

Welcome to the truly flexible era of Ryzen -- now with Radeon graphics inside!

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


Cautionary Statement:

This blog contains forward-looking statements concerning Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) including the features, functionality, availability, timing, deployment, and expected opportunities of AMD’s Ryzen™ Desktop Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics and AMD’s plans to release a full family of Ryzen 2000 Series processors in Spring 2018, which are made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are commonly identified by words such as “goal,” "would," "may," "expects," "believes," "plans," "intends," "projects" and other terms with similar meaning. Investors are cautioned that the forward-looking statements in this blog are based on current beliefs, assumptions and expectations, speak only as of the date of this blog and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations. Such statements are subject to certain known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond AMD's control, that could cause actual results and other future events to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. Investors are urged to review in detail the risks and uncertainties in AMD's Securities and Exchange Commission filings, including but not limited to AMD's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended September 30, 2017.

 

Endnotes

1. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 12/08/2017 for the Ryzen 5 2400G, and 09/04/2015 for the Core i7-5775c on the following systems. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. System Configs:  All systems equipped with Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD, Windows 10 RS2 operating system. Socket AM4 System: Ryzen 52400G processor, 16B (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2667 RAM, Graphics Driver 1710181048-17.40-171018a-319170E 23.20.768.0 :: 12/08/2017. Socket LGA1150 System: Core i7-5775c processor, 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3-1867 MHz RAM, graphics driver 10.18.15.4256:: 09/04/2015

3DMark 11 Performance benchmark used to represent graphics power. The following processors achieved the following scores in 3DMark 11 ‘performance’ benchmark v1.0.132.0: The Ryzen 5 2400G: 5042.  Also in v1.0.132.0, .The Core i7-5775c, the Intel desktop processor with the highest Intel desktop graphics performance, achieved 3094. RZG-01

2.  Vulkan and the Vulkan logo are registered trademarks of the Khronos Group Inc.

3.  WARNING: AMD processors, including chipsets, CPUs, APUs and GPUs (collectively and individually “AMD processor”), are intended to be operated only within their associated specifications and factory settings. Operating your AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings, including but not limited to the conducting of overclocking (including use of this overclocking software, even if such software has been directly or indirectly provided by AMD or an entity otherwise affiliated in any way with AMD), may damage your processor, affect the operation of your processor or the security features therein and/or lead to other problems, including but not limited to damage to your system components (including your motherboard and components thereon (e.g., memory)), system instabilities (e.g., data loss and corrupted images), reduction in system performance, shortened processor, system component and/or system life, and in extreme cases, total system failure. It is recommended that you save any important data before using the tool.  AMD does not provide support or service for issues or damages related to use of an AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings. You may also not receive support or service from your board or system manufacturer. Please make sure you have saved all important data before using this overclocking software. DAMAGES CAUSED BY USE OF YOUR AMD PROCESSOR OUTSIDE OF OFFICIAL AMD SPECIFICATIONS OR OUTSIDE OF FACTORY SETTINGS ARE NOT COVERED UNDER ANY AMD PRODUCT WARRANTY AND MAY NOT BE COVERED BY YOUR BOARD OR SYSTEM MANUFACTURER’S WARRANTY.

4.  Names used for informational purposes only. No endorsement is implied.

5.  High Dynamic Range (HDR) requires an HDR-enabled content chain, including: content, display, operating system, graphics driver, and GPU.

UPDATE 05/08/2018

Please note that Precision Boost 2 is also a core feature of the new 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Desktop Processor! To learn more about how Precision Boost 2 helps maximize the performance behind the best gaming CPUs of 2018, we have a quick and educational video that explains it all.

 


 

By now, many know that every AMD Ryzen™ processor offers a suite of capabilities called AMD SenseMI technology. This suite of intelligent features allows our processors to understand their operating environment and adapt for lower power consumption, better performance, and cooler operation.1

 

One of the key performance technologies in AMD SenseMI is called Precision Boost. Precision Boost allows an AMD Ryzen processor to dramatically increase clockspeeds when the CPU has electrical, thermal, and/or utilization headroom to spare. In other words: if the processor’s analysis of its own environment indicates that it can safely go faster… it will! Precision Boost is a core capability of AMD Ryzen processors for desktop PCs, which we launched in March of this year.

 

 

More recently, we introduced a new relative in the Ryzen family: the AMD Ryzen Mobile Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics for ultrathin laptops. The nimble and efficient Ryzen Processors with Radeon Graphics have an evolved version of Precision Boost with a straightforward name: Precision Boost 2. Today we’ll be looking at how Precision Boost and Precision Boost 2 compare, and show how the enhanced capabilities of Precision Boost 2 can capitalize on new performance opportunities.

 

Boost Basics

Besides the specifications you can read on the side of the box, processors also have specifications that define safe operating temperatures and power draw from your motherboard. Of course, different programs will also use a certain percentage of the CPU’s circuits. It is useful to imagine these three limits —power, temperature, and utilization—as a triangle. For the sake of conversation, let’s call that the “reliability triangle.” To ensure your processor is reliable over the long haul, it makes sense that processors self-manage to stay inside the reliability triangle.

 

Precision Boost

But if the processor isn’t likely to leave the reliability triangle when processing a given workload, then that processor should also be able to recognize the opportunity to go faster for more performance. That’s where Precision Boost steps in! Precision Boost can continuously raise clockspeeds until reaching the rated maximum frequency, or reaching a boundary of the triangle (whichever comes first). Once the clockspeed reaches one of these limits, Precision Boost will try to maintain that peak performance by tweaking the clockspeed up and down in small increments of just 25MHz.

 

Precision Boost on the AMD Ryzen desktop processor uses the above behavior in two modes: when an application is using up to two CPU cores (“two-core boost”), or more than two CPU cores (“all-core boost”). The maximum clockspeed for the two-core boost is higher, because fewer cores predictably use less energy and generate less heat. This bimodal boost configuration is a great way to ensure relatively consistent or predictable boost behavior as workloads change.

 

The AMD Ryzen™ 5 1600 processor provides a helpful real-world example:

  • It can boost up to 3.6GHz for workloads using 1-2 cores
  • It can boost up to 3.4GHz for workloads using 3-6 cores
  • And it has a base clock of up to 3.2GHz if boost is not feasible

 

Precision Boost 2

Precision Boost 2 for the Ryzen Processor with Radeon Graphics is also based on the reliability triangle, but with a major difference: Precision Boost 2 does not impose a lower clock speed limit if more than two CPU cores are being used. Precision Boost 2 only assesses whether the processor is within specifications, and continues to boost—on any number of cores—until reaching the maximum clockspeed printed on the box, or bumping into a boundary on the reliability triangle (whichever comes first).

 

This new, more flexible boost can have a big impact on applications that spawn many lightweight processing threads. Even collectively, light threads often don’t demand much of the processor, which means they don’t require much energy or generate much heat to process. Where an AMD Ryzen desktop processor with Precision Boost would move into the lower frequency all-core boost for such workloads, Precision Boost 2 can allow a Ryzen Mobile Processor with Radeon Graphics to keep cranking the clockspeeds as high as possible on however many cores the workload requires.

 

If you were to chart the CPU clockspeeds in a workload from one to many threads, the plot you could draw for Precision Boost 2 is more graceful and gradual than its predecessor with increased numbers of active cores. And for workloads with many cores in use, Precision Boost 2 can be especially opportunistic about capitalizing on headroom opportunities (Figure 1).

 


Figure 1: Precision Boost 2 enables new opportunities to raise CPU frequencies on Ryzen Processors with Radeon Vega graphics, (Red) especially when there are many threads in flight. Chart for illustrative purposes.

 

 

But a scenario you can measure is even better! To do that, we fired up an application called OCCT. OCCT is a stability tester that scales nicely from one to many threads. That scalability is a perfect way to show you how Precision Boost 2 has a graceful and opportunistic behavior as more cores become used.

 

In figure 2, we’re looking at OCCT on the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U processor This is a four core, eight thread processor with a base clockspeed of 2.2GHz and a boost frequency of up to 3.8GHz. At the left end of the chart, we see a single worker thread hit close to the max at 3.67GHz, and gradually level off to about 2.9GHz as more cores and threads were used.

 

  

Figure 2: Precision Boost 2 running on 1-8 CPU threads in the 4C8T AMD Ryzen 7 2700U. Precision Boost 2 enables notable clockspeed upside, even with the maximum number of threads. Tested as of 10/27/2017 by AMD performance labs in the HP ENVY x360 notebook: 2x4GB DDR4-2400, Samsung 850 EVO SSD, 1080p display, Windows® 10 x64 1703, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, graphics driver 17.11.

 

This graceful curve illustrates the environmental awareness of Precision Boost 2, but take note of the 2.9 GHz frequency on the right end of the chart: it’s a full 700MHz above the base clockspeed on all threads. It’s proof positive that Precision Boost 2 can intelligently enable big CPU frequency increases on any number of active threads!

 

Being an opportunistic boost algorithm, however, it’s important to point out that the exact behavior of Precision Boost 2 will vary with the workload and the system. As a general set of guidelines: Lighter apps get more boost, heavier apps get less boost. Cooler temperatures get more boost, warmer temperatures get less boost. But, overall, Precision Boost 2 in the Ryzen Processor with Radeon Graphics is designed to let more cores boost more often for more performance in your PC.

 

If you’re interested in learning more about the processors with Precision Boost 2, check out the AMD Ryzen Processor with Radeon Vega graphics, which we just launched for ultrathin notebook PCs.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

Footnotes:

  1. Visit amd.com/en/technologies/sense-mi for complete details of the AMD SenseMI technologies and per-processor capabilities.

Ultrathin notebooks are incredibly popular with laptop buyers, and it’s easy to see why: they’re not that much larger or heavier than an actual paper notebook, and they often have great battery life. Today, AMD is making the Ultrathin experience even better with the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics—the world’s fastest processor for Ultrathin PCs!

 

Let’s look at the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, one of our powerful new processors.

 

CPU Performance

The first characteristic of a great processor is, of course, fast CPU cores. The AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon graphics is designed for ultrathin notebooks and offers elite performance in lightweight tasks (“1T” below), alongside absolutely dominant performance in more challenging workloads (“nT” below).1 Long story short: whether you’re clicking buttons, loading up on browser tabs, or running demanding creative apps, this kind of performance can help your notebook stay snappy.

 

See endnote 1 for details.

 

Graphics Performance

And as the world’s digital artists continuously offer richer and more engaging movies or games, you also need graphics processing cores that can rise to the occasion. The graphics core built right into the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U and Ryzen™ 5 2500U processors are absolute beasts in their classes, offering up to 2.6X the graphics performance of its peers.2

 

See endnote 2 for details.

 

 

In fact, the Radeon™ Vega graphics on the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, for example, is fast enough to play the latest games on a thin and light notebook. That’s good news for road warriors who just want to unwind with some light gaming after a long day of travel and meetings. Sure, a desktop PC or a gaming notebook could offer even more performance, but your back and shoulders might be less pleased after carrying one all day long! Plus, the gaming is smooth: the chart below has 95th percentile frame times of 30 FPS+.

 

See endnote 3 for details.

 

Energy Efficiency

We’ve calculated that our new processor is 5.86X more energy efficient  than processors we were making three years ago, but what does that really mean at the end of the day? It means that we’re aiming to give you up to twice the battery life of our previous-generation mobile chips.

 

In the chart below, VP9 playback represents YouTube, H.264 is used by major streaming services like Amazon and Netflix, and MobileMark 14 is a good proxy for continuously using your PC to do work or browse the web.  These are practical, everyday tasks that we want you to enjoy a lot longer with your new AMD Ryzen™ processor with Radeon™ graphics.

 

See endnote 5 for details.

 

Putting it all together

Today’s laptop customers are working, playing, and creating on the road. I’m one of those customers, too. Like you, I want a snappy PC, I want my data to be secure, and I want it to be a while before I need to find a plug. AMD heard you loud and clear, and we are confident the Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics is exactly what you’re looking for.

 

But, as they say: a picture is worth a thousand words.

 

See endnote 6 for details.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


FOOTNOTES:

  1. Based on AMD testing as of 9/25/2017. System configuration(s): AMD Reference Motherboard (Ryzen™ 7 2700U), Acer Spin 5 (8550U), HP ENVY X360 (7500U), 2x4GB DDR4-2400, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, 1920x1080. Intel Graphics Driver: 22.20.16.4691. AMD Graphics Driver: 23.20.768.9. Cinebench R15 1t/nT scores: 144/719 (2700U) vs. 159/498 (8550U) vs. 147/325 (7500U). Cinebench R15 1t scores vs. Ryzen™ 7 2700U Baseline of 144: 7500U = 102%, 8550U = 110%. Ryzen™ 7 2700U Cinebench R15 nT score of 719 is 221% of 7500U and 144% of 8550U. Different configurations may yield different results.
  2. Based on AMD testing as of 9/25/2017. Common system configurations for HP ENVY X360 systems, Acer Swift 3, and AMD Reference Platform: Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, 1920x1080; Intel Graphics Driver: 22.20.16.4691; AMD Ryzen™ mobile APU Graphics Driver: 23.20.768.9; AMD FX-9800P Graphics Driver: 22.19.662.4; AMD FX-9800P configured in HP ENVY X360 (1x8GB DDR4-2133). AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U configured in AMD reference platform (2x4GB DDR4-2400). Core i7-8550U configured in Acer Swift 3 (2x4GB DDR4-2400). Core i7-7500U configured in HP ENVY X360 (2x4GB DDR4-2400). GeForce 950M configured in Medion D17KHN (2x8GB DDR3-1600, Core i7-7500U, S11-256G-PHISON-SSD 256GB) – GeForce 950M results are from 3rd-party testing, available on the 3DMark® database at https://www.3dmark.com/spy/1115646 but results have not been verified by AMD. Graphics results measured with 3DMark® TimeSpy. Core i7-8550U score (350) is baseline 100%. Core i7-7500U score (377) is 107% of baseline. AMD FX-9800P score (400) is 114% of baseline. GeForce 950M with i7-7500U score (900) is 261% of baseline. AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U score (915) is 261% of baseline. Different configurations may yield different results.
  3. Based on AMD testing as of 9/25/2017. System configuration(s): HP ENVY X360, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, 2x4GB DDR4-2400, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, Graphics Driver: 17.30.1025, BIOS F11.
  4. Netflix, Amazon, and MobileMark brands used for informational purposes only. Absolutely no endorsement is implied.
  5. Based on AMD testing as of 10/11/2017. Battery life targets for the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Graphics assume a 50Wh battery, a fully power-optimized software/hardware solution stack, and the following system configuration: AMD Reference Platform, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U, 2x4GB DDR4-2400, graphics driver 17.30.1025, Windows 10 x64 (1703). VP9 battery life improvement of 4.5 hours to 9.2 hours represents 2.04. Actual battery life may vary with system configuration.
  6. Based on internal AMD testing as of 10/08/2017. Common system configurations: Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, 2x4GB DDR4-2400, 1920x1080; Intel Graphics Driver: 22.20.16.4691; AMD Ryzen™ mobile APU Graphics Driver: 23.20.768.9; AMD Reference Platform (2700U); Acer Spin 5 (8550U). All scores listed in order of 2700U vs. 8550U, with 2700U set as the 100% baseline. “3D Graphics” defined as 3DMark TimeSpy (915/100% v. 350/38%); “Data Security” defined as TrueCrypt 7.1a 1GB AES (4.6GBps/100% v. 3.3GBps/72%); “I/O Performance” defined as geomean of the eight Crystal Diskmark storage scores (218/100% v. 229/105%); Content Creation defined as POV-Ray 3.7 (1402/100% v. 1101/79%); Productivity defined as PCMark 10 Extended (3102/100% v. 2533/82%); Power Efficiency defined as Cinebench R15 nT score divided by 15W nominal processor TDP: Cinebench R15 nT scores (719 v. 498), nT Score/15W (47.93/100% v. 33.2/69%). Results may vary with configuration and driver versions. RVM-23

At AMD, we believe that technology plays a pivotal role in building a healthy planet for ourselves and our children. We do our part with more efficient computing architectures, energy management technologies, and smart manufacturing processes. Such innovations are our bread and butter, but we thought we could do a little more…

 

So, in 2014, AMD set an ambitious goal: compared to our processors at the time, we wanted our processors with integrated GPUs to be 25X more energy efficient by 2020. We called the goal 25x20, and we have charted our progress towards the goal with each new mobile processor release.

 

Our 2015 and 2016 processors, the 6th Generation (“Carrizo”) and 7th Generation (“Bristol Ridge”) AMD A-Series APUs, were each ahead of pace to achieve the 25x20 goal. And today, we’re celebrating that our latest such processor—the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics—is also ahead of the curve!

 

In fact, we can put a number on it: 5.86X greater energy efficiency since “Kaveri” in 2014.1

 

 

Staying ahead of the trend line represents thousands of hours from our talented engineers. And for you, our potential customer, the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics represents a marvelous step forward for thin and light notebooks:

 

  • Its CPU performance is up to 3X faster than our 2016 notebook processor.2
  • Its GPU performance is up to 2.29X faster than our 2016 notebook processor.3
  • And it uses up to 58% less power while reaching those extraordinary speeds.4

 

That’s the magic formula giving our tiny little chip everything it needs to outrun its predecessor, stay ahead of schedule on meeting our 25x20 goal, and give you a powerfully portable experience. Ready to bring home efficient performance for yourself? Learn more about the AMD Ryzen™ Processor with Radeon™ Vega Graphics today.

 


FOOTNOTES:

  1. Based on AMD internal testing as of 10/12/2017. Relative energy efficiency based on a 50:50 weighted average of CPU+GPU performance (variable “C”), as evaluated by Cinebench R15 nT and 3DMark 11 scores, divided by typical energy usage (variable “E”) as defined by: ETEC (Typical Energy Consumption for notebook computers), Energy Star Program Requirements Rev 6.1 10/2014. AMD “Kaveri” represents the baseline of 1.0X for CPU, GPU, and ETEC. AMD “Carrizo” efficiency 1.23C/0.35E=3.51X. AMD “Bristol Ridge” efficiency 1.36C/0.34E=3.97X. AMD “Raven Ridge” efficiency 2.56E/0.44E=5.86X. Scores in order of Cinebench R15 nT/3DMark 11 P Score: “Kaveri” 232/2142 (100%), “Carrizo” 277/2709 (123%), “Bristol Ridge” 279/3234 (136%), “Raven Ridge” 719/4315 (256%). Results may vary with configuration and driver versions. RVM-21
    "Kaveri""Carrizo""Bristol Ridge""Raven Ridge"
    AMD Reference Platform
    AMD FX-7600P
    2x4GB DDR3L-1600
    Crucial CT256M4SSD2
    Windows 8.1 x64 9600
    Graphics Driver 13.350.0.0
    1366x768
    AMD Reference Platform
    AMD FX-8800P
    2x2GB DDR3-1866
    Crucial CT256M550SSD1
    Windows 10 x64 10586
    Graphics Driver 21.19.137.514
    1366x768

    AMD Reference Platform
    AMD FX-9830P
    2x4GB DDR4-2133
    Crucial CT256M4SSD2

    Windows 10 x64 10586
    Graphics Driver 21.19.137.514
    1366x768

    AMD Reference Platform
    AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U
    2x4GB DDR4-2400
    Samsung 850 Pro SSD
    Windows 10 x64 1703
    Graphics Driver: 22.19.655.2
    1920x1080
  2. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 10/05/2017.  PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Performance may vary with driver versions.  AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U: AMD Reference, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U with Radeon™ Vega 10 Processor Graphics, 8GB DDR4-2400 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SATA SSD, Windows 10 Pro RS2, Graphics driver 23.20.768.9, 26-Sep-2017. AMD FX™ 9800P: HP 81AA, AMD FX™ 9800P with Radeon™ R7 Mobile Graphics, 8GB DDR4-2133 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SATA SSD, Windows 10 Pro RS2, Graphics driver 22.19.662.4, 19-Jul-2017. Cinebench R15 nT is used to simulate CPU performance; the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U scored 719, while the FX 9800P scored 240 for a benchmark score comparison of 719/240 = 3.00X or 200% more. RVM-16
  3. Testing by AMD Performance labs. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Performance may vary with driver versions.  AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U: AMD Reference, AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U with Radeon™ Vega 10 Processor Graphics, 8GB DDR4-2400 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SATA SSD, Windows 10 Pro RS2, Graphics driver 23.20.768.9, 26-Sep-2017. AMD FX™ 9800P: HP 81AA, AMD FX™ 9800P with Radeon™ R7 Mobile Graphics, 8GB DDR4-2133 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SATA SSD, Windows 10 Pro RS2, Graphics driver 22.19.662.4, 19-Jul-20173DMark® Time Spy is used to simulate graphics performance; the AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U scored 915, while the AMD FX™ 9800P scored 400 for a benchmark score comparison of 915/400 = 2.29X or 129% more performance. RVM-17
  4. Based on AMD testing as of 9/28/2017. System configuration(s): AMD Reference Motherboard (2700U), HP ENVY X360 (FX-9800P/”7th Gen APU”), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 x64 1703, 1920x1080. AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U Graphics Driver: 23.20.768.9. AMD FX-9800P Graphics Driver: 22.19.662.4. 1x8GB DDR4-2133 (AMD FX-9800P). 2x4GB DDR4-2400 (AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U). Power Consumption defined as joules of power consumed during a complete run of Cinebench R15 nT:  AMD FX™ 9800P = 3782 joules (100%) vs. AMD Ryzen™ 7 2700U =1594J (58% less). Different configurations may yield different results RVM-25

Over the last few weeks, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor has cemented a place in the world as today’s ultimate solution for creators and enthusiasts. It’s easy to see why: scores of cores, piles of PCI Express® lanes, plus powerful quad-channel memory support. And, today, we’re making the best a little better with a beta release of free support for bootable NVMe RAID!

 

HERE’S HOW IT WORKS

NOTICE: Any user that has an existing SATA RAID config must back up the array’s data and break down the current array before proceeding with driver install and BIOS upgrade. Please see additional details in our knowledgebase article.

 

  1. Download the latest AMD RAIDXpert2 package to obtain the NVMe RAID driver and management software.
  2. Update the BIOS for your AMD X399-based motherboard to add BIOS support for NVMe RAID.
  3. Install two or more NVMe SSDs to your system.
  4. Create a new NVMe RAID array:
    1. Method A: …Using your motherboard’s firmware. There will be a new menu in your BIOS, or a new menu accessible with a hotkey during POST. This will vary by model.
    2. Method B: …using the AMD RAIDXpert2 software.
    3. Make sure your disks do not contain important data!
  5. Just enjoy! No hardware activation keys, license fees, or arbitrary SSD restrictions apply. It’s that simple.

 

AMD RAIDXpert2 is a Windows GUI to create and monitor NVMe RAID arrays like the 6-disk RAID0 array above. Arrays can also be created through new menus in your motherboard’s firmware.

 

WHAT’S THE PERFORMANCE LIKE?

In a word: wow. In our own performance testing, we’ve been seeing some blistering results from our test systems—a monstrous 21.2GB/s from six disks in RAID0! But RAID users know that scaling matters, too, and X399 NVMe RAID still looked great in our lab: 6.00X read scaling, and 5.38X write scaling, from one to six disks (see chart below).

 

Performance will naturally vary based on the model and quantity of SSDs you use, plus the test pattern of your benchmark, but it’s clear that our free NVMe RAID solution can scale and scale fast.

 

 

Testing conducted by AMD performance labs as of 9/18/2017. Test configuration: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 1950X, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (16-16-16-36), ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399, 1-6x Samsung 960 Pro NVMe SSD (512GB ea.), default BIOS settings, Windows® 10 x64 RS2, NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 (driver 385.41), RAID Writeback Cache ENABLED, RAID Read Cache DISABLED, Write Cache Buffer Flush DISABLED.

 

COMMON QUESTIONS

Q: Do I need to buy some sort of activation hardware or license to enable NVMe RAID on the AMD Threadripper platform?

A: No. You only need to follow the steps 1-5 outlined in this blog.

 

Q: Is your NVMe RAID solution bootable?

A: Yes. Create the RAID array with the RAID management menu(s) in your BIOS, then proceed with Windows installation. Please ensure that your system is in pure UEFI mode by installing Windows with Compatibility Support Module (CSM) disabled in your BIOS. You will also need the NVMe RAID driver on a flash drive, as the Windows installer will ask for it before your array can be detected.

 

Q: What RAID levels are supported?

A: RAID0 (striping), RAID1 (mirroring), RAID10 (striping with mirroring). Please note that RAID10 requires four or six NVMe devices by design.

 

Q: How many simultaneous SSDs can I run?

A: The AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platform supports up to seven simultaneous PCIe® devices without adapters. Provided you have one GPU in the system, this sets a practical limit for most users of six NVMe SSDs.

 

Q: How are the NVMe SSDs electrically connected to the system?

A: NVMe SSDs are connected to the system over the PCI Express® bus. These PCI Express lanes come directly from the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor, rather than being routed through a relatively narrow link from the chipset.

 

Q: What AMD chipsets are compatible with NVMe RAID?

A: The AMD X399 chipset is compatible with our free NVMe RAID solution.

 

Q: Is hotswap supported in RAID1 and RAID10 arrays?

A: No.

 

Q: When will the required BIOS update be available for my AMD X399-based motherboard?

A: Please check with your manufacturer for the latest updates. We expect all AMD X399 motherboards to be updated imminently, though the exact date(s) of availability will depend on the motherboard vendor’s QA schedule.

 

Q: Do all AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ CPUs and motherboards qualify for NVMe RAID support?

A: Yes.

 

Q: What operating systems are supported?

A: Windows® 10 x64 (build 1703) is supported at this time.

 

Q: Can I use any NVMe SSD with this update?

A: Yes.

 

Q: If I already have a RAID array of SATA disks, can I just upgrade my driver and BIOS to add NVMe RAID support?
A: In-place upgrades of the RAID driver are not supported at this time. Please back up your data and break down your array prior to installing an NVMe RAID-ready BIOS or driver. AMD recommends that users start fresh with a new NVMe RAID array and a new install of Windows. To this effect, our knowledgebase article offers standalone drivers suitable for placing onto a flash drive for the Windows installer.

By now, many enthusiasts know the story of AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors: powerful creative performance, smooth gaming, and an uncompromising platform with tons of ports and lanes. The award-winning Threadripper 1950X and Threadripper 1920X CPUs proved that AMD is serious about HEDT performance, and that disrupting the status quo still matters in the most elite PC segment.

 

However, it’s a basic economic truth that not every creative user is able to spend up to $999 on a powerful processor. That does not diminish their appetite for a full complement of PCI Express® lanes, or quad-channel memory, or a feature-rich motherboard. But it did get us thinking about how to make that goodness more accessible, and we built the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X processor to answer the call. It’s available starting today with a manufacturer-recommended price of $549 USD!

 

About the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X CPU

“Just choose a core count” has been our mantra summarizing the consistent feature set of the Threadripper family, and that extends to the Threadripper 1900X, which has a lot in common with its big brothers: boost clocks up to 4.0GHz, Extended Frequency Range (XFR) clocks up to 4.2GHz, quad channel DRAM support, 64 PCIe® lanes, and a 180W TDP. In fact, you can count the differences on one hand:

 

  • The Threadripper 1900X has a higher base clock at 3.8GHz
  • There’s 20MB of L2+L3 cache
  • It has 8 cores and 16 threads

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900XAMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920XAMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X
Cores/Threads

8/16

12/2416/32
CCX Configuration4+0 (Die0) / 4+0 (Die1)3+3 (Die0) / 3+3 (Die1)4+4 (Die0) / 4+4 (Die1)
L2 Cache Configuration512K per core (4MB total)512K per core (6MB total)512K per core (8MB total)
L3 Cache Configuration8MB per die (16MB total)16MB per die (32MB total)16MB per die (32MB total)
Base Frequency3.8GHz3.5GHz3.4GHz
All Cores Boost FrequencyUp to 3.9GHzUp to 3.7GHzUp to 3.7GHz
Boost FrequencyUp to 4.0GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.0GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.0GHz (4 cores)
XFR FrequencyUp to 4.2GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.2GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.2GHz (4 cores)
PCIe® Gen3 Lanes646464
DDR Channels444
ECC SupportYesYesYes
TDP180W180W180W

 

The Threadripper 1900X for Content Creators

During the launch of the AMD Ryzen™ 7 1800X processor in March, we were pleased to see how digital content creators (DCC) especially took to an 8-core CPU as the new normal. But we did hear feedback from some that more lanes and more memory channels would be the perfect complement to that kind of CPU. We could only smile coyly at the time, knowing that one day the Threadripper 1900X would exist to answer those needs to a T.  And here we are!

 

The Ryzen Threadripper 1900X processor represents a tip of the scales towards the DCC side, enabling new performance upside and scalability over our most powerful CPU in the mainstream AMD AM4 Platform. For example: anyone with a thirst for GPU acceleration—Blender cycles or V-Ray, anybody? —can pack up to seven PCIe x8 accelerators into the Threadripper platform! That kind of expansion just can’t be found in any other HEDT platform today.

 

See footnote #1 for complete test configuration.

 

The Threadripper 1900X for Gaming

When work is done and it’s time to play, the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X packs a punch in the gaming department. In fact, it’s in the ballpark with the 8-core AMD Ryzen 7 processors, which are still winning awards for their excellent gaming performance. Naturally, we still recommend an AMD Ryzen 7/5/3 processor for anyone that just wants to game, but the Threadripper 1900X comfortably holds its own when it’s time to win some chicken dinners after a hard day’s work.

 

See footnote #2 for complete test configuration.

 

The “Threadripper Experience”

At AMD, we put a lot of thought into what it means to own an ultra-high-end PC platform, and made it our mission to cram all that goodness into AMD Ryzen Threadripper processor and the AMD X399 Chipset:

 

  • Powerful multi-threaded creative performance beyond the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X
  • A fully-featured chipset (e.g. 60 usable PCIe® lanes)
  • Quad-channel DDR4 infrastructure
  • ECC memory support up to 512GB per DIMM slot
  • Smooth and comfortable gaming at the important 60/120/144Hz thresholds
  • A soldered heatspreader with an indium alloy TIM for optimal heat exchange to your cooler
  • Top-5% die selection for higher clockspeeds at lower voltages
  • Unlocked voltage and multipliers for overclocking3
  • Premium motherboards with 10-layer PCBs, robust VRMs, and extensive I/O
  • A diverse selection of coolers designed for Threadripper
  • Can we brag? Have you seen the packaging?

 

For creators who game, and gamers who create, it’s hard to do any better than that. And starting today at $549 USD SEP with the new Threadripper 1900X model, the uncompromising Threadripper platform has never been more accessible.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


 

Footnotes:

1. Testing by AMD performance labs as of 8/22/2017. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith X399 (1900X), Asus Crosshair VI Hero (1800X), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1900X), 2x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1800X), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 384.94), Windows® 10 RS2, AMD Ryzen™ Balanced Power Plan. Raw Scores (1900X vs. 1800X): Cinebench R15 (1743 vs. 1646), Handbrake (8m44s vs. 9m09s) lower is better, POV-Ray (3550 vs. 3404), Blender (50m vs. 49m30s) lower is better, 7-Zip (44186 vs. 43539), VeraCrypt 1GB AES (14.7 vs. 13.6), Adobe Premiere Pro CC (12m19s vs. 12m17s) lower is better. Performance may vary with latest drivers. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. RZN-75

2. Testing by AMD performance labs as of 8/22/2017. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith X399 (1900X), Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming5 (1800X), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1900X), 2x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1800X), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 384.94), Windows® 10 RS2, AMD Ryzen™ Balanced Power Plan. Testing results are an average of 5 runs. Performance may vary with latest drivers. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Performance may vary based on the graphics card.

3. WARNING: AMD processors, including chipsets, CPUs, APUs and GPUs (collectively and individually “AMD processor”), are intended to be operated only within their associated specifications and factory settings. Operating your AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings, including but not limited to the conducting of overclocking (including use of this overclocking software, even if such software has been directly or indirectly provided by AMD or an entity otherwise affiliated in any way with AMD), may damage your processor, affect the operation of your processor or the security features therein and/or lead to other problems, including but not limited to damage to your system components (including your motherboard and components thereon (e.g., memory)), system instabilities (e.g., data loss and corrupted images), reduction in system performance, shortened processor, system component and/or system life, and in extreme cases, total system failure. It is recommended that you save any important data before using the tool.  AMD does not provide support or service for issues or damages related to use of an AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings. You may also not receive support or service from your board or system manufacturer. Please make sure you have saved all important data before using this overclocking software. DAMAGES CAUSED BY USE OF YOUR AMD PROCESSOR OUTSIDE OF OFFICIAL AMD SPECIFICATIONS OR OUTSIDE OF FACTORY SETTINGS ARE NOT COVERED UNDER ANY AMD PRODUCT WARRANTY AND MAY NOT BE COVERED BY YOUR BOARD OR SYSTEM MANUFACTURER’S WARRANTY.

When creators with the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ CPU are done designing the world around us, it’s only natural that they’d want to kick back and play some games. Today I wanted to give you a brief look at what to expect with the 2560x1440 resolution that has proven so popular in this high-end segment.

 

Testing by AMD labs as of 7/27/2017. All results an average of five runs using “high” graphics presets. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399 (BIOS 0303), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, Windows® 10 x64 Creator’s Update, Ryzen Balanced Performance Plan.

 

A picture says a thousand words: the Threadripper platform effortlessly transitions into making quick work of graphically demanding games. In the workloads we tested, we saw average framerates around 60, 120, and 144 FPS, depending on the title. That’s a great experience for today’s 1440p displays!

 

Seeing this level of performance on graphically challenging games makes me happy, because I know that represents plenty of horsepower for games like CS:GO and Rocket League where raw framerates are king.

 

Introducing Game Mode

Making a hugely multi-core CPU that’s ready for gaming is a challenging effort, because most PC games are designed for the typical 4-8 core processor. When greater core counts enter the picture, things can get squirrelly: poor thread scheduling can reduce performance, or (more rarely) the game may simply not run at all. The Threadripper team at AMD spent a long time thinking about how we can help our customers avoid these scenarios altogether, and we call it Game Mode.

 

Game Mode is a new feature in AMD Ryzen™ Master  that reconfigures the platform in two key ways:

  • It temporarily disables half of the CPU cores, which turns the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X into an 8C16T device (like the AMD Ryzen™ 1800X) and the 1920X into a 6C12T device (like the AMD Ryzen™ 1600X). For the truly technical, this is a 4+4 CCX configuration on one die. This ensures the game encounters the number of cores it was truly designed to handle. Please note that Game Mode does not disable SMT.
  • We tell the OS to use a Local Mode (NUMA) memory, which keeps a game and its memory footprint inside one CPU die and the locally-connected DRAM. This minimizes several key latency points in the system, which most games love.

 

Together, these changes can make a big difference for the games that weren’t designed with a beastly 12-core or 16-core processor in mind! When you’re ready for heavy threaded workloads, switching back to “Creator Mode” in AMD Ryzen Master effortlessly reverts these changes.

 

See footnote.

 

Game On

From the beginning, we envisioned the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platform as a do-it-all powerhouse built for the enthusiasts with demanding workloads that span work and play. With the powerful “Zen” architecture, tons of compute, and AMD Ryzen Master to optimize gaming performance, we think we got the recipe right for these users. We can’t wait to see what you do with Threadripper!

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


FOOTNOTES:

Testing by AMD Performance labs as of July 22, 2017 on the following systems. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used.

 

System Configurations: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X processors on an ASUS ROG X399 Zenith Extreme motherboard. All systems equipped with 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD, Windows 10 RS2 operating system, Geforce TX 1080 Ti graphics adapter, Graphics driver 384.76 :: 7/22/2017.

 

The Threadripper 1950X achieved average frame rates as follows in the following games at 1080p: In Gears of War Ultimate High (DX12), an average frame rate of 104.8 in default UMA mode and 121.11 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (121.11/104.8=1.14 or 14%) in legacy game mode; In Fallout 4 (Ultra), an average frame rate of 60.08 in default UMA mode and 72.29 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (72.29/60.08=1.17 or 17%) in legacy game mode; In Hitman Absolution (Ultra), an average frame rate of 76.54 in default UMA mode and 84.92 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (84.92/76.54=1.10 or 10%) in legacy game mode.  In Call of Duty: Modern Warfare an average frame rate of 91.27 in default UMA mode and 146.25 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (91.27/146.25=1.38 or 38%) in legacy game mode.

 

On average, with a sampling of over 60 actual games and settings as detailed in 1950X_LGM_vs_Mission.xlxs, performance uplift with Legacy Game Mode enabled is about 5% over Creator Mode. RZN-70

When I was a young lad, the first PC I ever built with my own money used the sensational 1GHz “Thunderbird” AMD Athlon™, ASUS A7V motherboard, and a GeForce 2 GTS. It was funded with my little paper route delivering the Tribune newspaper in Royal Oak, MI. My family had played PC games since the 486 era, but that system felt like an ascension to something truly special. Through it, I fell in love with the hardware, rather than just using the hardware. Ten years later, chance would have it that I’d come full circle to begin work at AMD.

 

I’ve been a PC enthusiast for a long time, and there are few things I love more than a great new piece of hardware that stands heads and shoulders above its peers. I think most enthusiasts know that feeling. There’s just something exciting about looking at “the best,” plus it’s fun to marvel at a giant leap forward within one generation of hardware. And though I am certainly biased, that’s how I feel about the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platform with the new AMD X399 chipset.

 

The exhaustiveness of it all just makes me giddy:

  • 64 PCI Express® lanes
  • Quad-channel DDR4
  • Up to 2 native USB 3.1 Gen2 ports
  • Up to 14 USB 3.1 Gen1 ports
  • Up to 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Up to 16 SATA ports

 

That is a lot of connectivity. In fact, it’s enough for me to comfortably run quad GPU, 3TB of NVMe storage, every USB device in my house, every SATA drive I’ve ever owned… and still have room to spare.

 

ASRock X399 MotherboardASUS MotherboardGigabyte X399 Motherboard ImageMSI X399 Motherboard

ASRock X399 Taichi

ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme

GIGABYTE X399 AORUS Gaming 7

MSI X399 Gaming Pro Carbon AC

 

Motherboards with the AMD X399 chipset are just beautiful, too: premium materials, great cooling, nice layouts, high-end controllers, LED readouts, exhaustive BIOSes, and lots of headers for fans and RGB. Precisely what I want out of a motherboard!

 

And unlike the other guy, the AMD X399 doesn’t have a confusing matrix of lanes, ports, and memory channels that go dark if you buy the wrong CPU. You always get the same connectivity with AMD X399, regardless of what Threadripper CPU you buy. That’s what enthusiasts deserve when committing to an HEDT platform.

 

There are often times in this industry when “best” is a nebulous decision filled with what-ifs and “well, it depends.” It sure didn’t feel that way with my “Thunderbird” Athlon, and it’s hard not to feel the same way about X399 today. When it comes to ultimate PC platforms, nothing else comes close.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

Proverb: “Time is money.”

 

Few know this more acutely than the creator, whose compile or render times could take hours, days… or even weeks. Every minute spent watching a progress bar is another minute—another dollar—squandered. 3D artists, video editors, and software developers know this problem especially well. But those creators also know that a powerful CPU can claw back those precious minutes to get things done. And when it comes to chips that laugh in the face of sluggish progress bars, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor is the definitive choice.

 

 


See footnote for raw scores and system configuration.

 

And there’s the picture to prove it. If your job or hobby depends on creative workloads like physically-based rendering, raytracing, or video editing, then a Threadripper CPU is easily your best defense against the pokey progress bars that cost you time and money.

 

It’s that simple.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


 

Footnote:

Testing conducted by AMD performance labs as of 7/31/2017. System configurations: 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399 (AMD), ASUS ROG STRIX X299-E (Intel), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 385.12), Thermaltake Water 3.0 Riing RGB 280, Windows® 10 x64 Creator’s Update. Raw scores (7900X vs. 1920X vs. 1950X): POV-Ray [4565,4845,5971]; Adobe Premiere Pro CC [9m06s,9m34s,7m48s] with 4K60 to YouTube 2160p preset (lower is better); Handbrake [6m55s,6m35s,5m43s] with 4K30 to 1080p AppleTV3 preset (lower is better); 7-Zip [57893,59899,73444]; VeraCrypt 50MB AES [15.6,18.5,24.2]; Corona Photorealism [90 sec,89 sec,71 sec] (lower is better). All tests an average of five runs.

Hey, everyone! Preorders for the crazy powerful AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors went live on July 31, and those with a CPU on the way may be wondering what cooler to buy for the 4094-pin sTR4 socket on the AMD X399 motherboards. Well, my friends, wonder no longer!

 

It's super simple: included with every AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPU is a free mounting bracket that enables compatibility with a wide range of premium closed-loop liquid cooling (CLC) solutions. These beautiful CLCs will keep your new Threadripper chip nice and chilly, and we maintain a list of over 20 solutions that are compatible with the included bracket. We'll be updating the list regularly for you!

 

There are also cooling solutions on the way that do not use AMD's provided bracket, and those will be added to the official list over time as well. Before purchasing such a solution, verify with the manufacturer or retailer that the cooler includes out-of-box sTR4 support. Some coolers pre-date the Ryzen Threadripper CPU, and are receiving mid-production updates after a certain date to include the compatible mounting hardware.

 


 

UPDATE NOTICE: The contents of this blog update have been migrated to the official Threadripper thermal solutions page on AMD.com at 3:47 PM Central on 2 August, 2017.

The release of AGESA 1.0.0.6 to mobo makers has resulted in a wave of fresh BIOS updates, each one packed with tons of new options for tweaking and overclocking memory.1 With so many options at your disposal, some have understandably asked: “what are the optimal settings for games?” Never one to leave an overclocking question unanswered, our illustrious overclocker Sami Makinen took his ASUS Crosshair VI and AMD Ryzen™ 1700 CPU for a spin to find the fastest combination of settings in a few different tests.2

 

Before we dig into the data, here’s what we analyzed:

  • The impact of the new BankGroupSwap (BGS) BIOS option
  • Single-rank DIMMs vs. dual-rank DIMMs
  • Automatic sub-timings vs. manually-tweaked subtimings
  • Max frequency vs. lower frequency at tighter timings
  • Geardown Mode (GDM) on vs. off

 

Digging into geardown mode

 

Let’s start with the impact of Geardown Mode (GDM), as it’s easy to address.

 

GDM is enabled by default for memory speeds greater than DDR4-2667 per the DDR4 spec. GDM allows the RAM to use a clock that’s one half the true DRAM frequency for the purposes of latching (storing a value) on the memory’s command or address buses. This conservative latching can potentially allow for higher clockspeeds, broader compatibility, and better stability—good for the average user.

 

But what about overclockers?1 For overclockers, Geardown Mode will be noteworthy because it also tells the memory subsystem to "disregard" the command rate set in the BIOS. As 1T command rates can be beneficial (though tough to maintain) for performance, the chart below is really asking whether it’s useful to run GDM if the desired memory clockspeed can be achieved.  Spoiler alert: probably not.

 

 

Our data points indicate that Geardown Mode should be disabled for gaming if you can achieve your desired memory overclock with a 1T command rate. The opposite holds true if 1T CR proves too aggressive to reach your desired clockspeed--leaving Geardown Mode enabled may get you there. Finally, when it comes to GDM vs. 2T CR (not shown), specific memory throughput testing should be conducted as the balance of power will come down to your other memory timings.

 

BankGroupSwap

 

BankGroupSwap (BGS) is a new memory mapping option in AGESA 1.0.0.6 that alters how applications get assigned to physical locations within the memory modules; the goal of this knob is to optimize how memory requests are executed after taking DRAM architecture and your memory timings into account. The theory goes that toggling this setting can shift the balance of performance in favor of either games or synthetic apps.

 

Our data seems to bear this out: our games got a little faster with BGS off, while AIDA64 memory bandwidth was higher with BGS ON.

 

 

 

Single rank vs. dual rank DIMMs

 

In the BankGroupSwap section, we alluded to “single rank” memory modules; that may have left some people scratching their head. That’s not surprising: memory ranks are largely unknown, not to mention cryptic. Starting from the top, PC enthusiasts know that a stick of memory is a circuit board with various memory chips attached. But have you ever thought about how a PC talks to those memory chips? That’s where ranks come in.

 

A “rank” is a group of memory chips that receive read and write commands as a group. Some memory sticks have all of their memory chips in one group, and those are single rank (SR) DIMMs. Other memory sticks split their memory chips into two groups, and those are called dual rank (DR) DIMMs.

 

DR modules can often be a smidge faster thanks to a capability called “rank interleaving,” wherein the second memory rank can still perform work while the first is being refreshed for use. However, DR modules are often harder for a system to drive to high frequency, which is why most high-performance memory kits use multiple 4GB or 8GB SR memory sticks. The extra frequency achievable by the SR memory modules is often enough to overcome the small performance benefit of DR DIMMs, too.

 

You can often tell single and dual rank memory apart by looking at the product code, which might say 1Rx4 or 1Rx8 for single rank, or 2Rx4 or 2Rx8 for dual rank. And though you should always verify with spec sheet, it’s a decent shortcut to assume an 8GB DDR4 DIMM is single rank, whereas a 16GB DIMM is almost certainly dual rank.

 

As we finally come to the data, our results lend credence that—all things being equal—DR memory configurations are a touch faster than SR configs for the purposes of PC gaming. But all things aren’t equal when it comes to overclocking memory, and we’ll explore that in the conclusion.

 

 

Automatic timings vs. manual tuning

 

Every overclocker knows that memory runs on “timings,” which are various wait periods PC memory must make as it completes a full cycle of reading or writing data. Lowering the timing values (making them more aggressive) can yield better performance by shrinking the wait periods. However, timings that are too aggressive can easily lead to instability and memory corruption as the memory struggles to accurately read and write its own data.

 

Motherboards generally take on all the heavy lifting of setting the complicated list of memory timings through mechanisms like SPD and XMP. These timings are configured to balance the fussy triangle of performance, compatibility, and stability. But was there something being left on the table? Sami intervened to find out, and his results couldn’t be clearer: overclockers with the wherewithal to hand-tune their memory timings can extract notably better performance in the PC games we looked at. Some games might be less sensitive to memory timings, but these tasks seem to love it.

 


Full timings for DDR4-3200 “maxed”: tCL = 12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60Ω.

 

The ancient debate: frequency or timings?

 

Last, but not least, Sami set out to find whether it was tighter timings or higher clockspeeds that mattered most on the AMD Ryzen™ processor. Sami pushed this combination of hardware up to DDR4-3520, DDR4-3466 with tighter timings, and DDR4-3200 with the tightest timings that could be achieved while maintaining stability with Memtest.

 

The verdict: tighter timings won. DDR4-3200 with aggressive timing adjustments outperformed the looser timings needed to hit DDR4-3520, while 3466 clearly split the difference with the right balance of timings and frequency.

 


DDR4-3200 “maxed” settings: tCL =12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60Ω. DDR4-3466 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDR/W = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 28, ProcODT = 60Ω, CR = 1T, GDM = Disabled, BGS = Disabled. DDR4-3520 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDW/R = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 30, tRC = 56, tWR = 14, tWCL = 12, tRFC = 312, ProcODT = 53.3Ω.

 

Putting it all together

 

Now that we’ve picked through the data in isolation, we thought it would prove useful to take a mile-high view and draw some conclusions about what we found from our data set, and how that might impact gaming on the AMD AM4 platform.

 


DDR4-3200 “maxed” settings: tCL =12, tRCDW/R = 12, tRP = 12, tRAS = 28, tRC = 54, tWR = 12, tWCL = 9, tRFC = 224, tRTP = 8, tRDRDSCL = 2, tWRWRSCL = 2, ProcODT = 60Ω. DDR4-3466 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDR/W = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 28, ProcODT = 60Ω, CR = 1T, GDM = Disabled, BGS = Disabled. DDR4-3520 “tuned” settings: tCL = 14, tRCDW/R = 14, tRP = 14, tRAS = 30, tRC = 56, tWR = 14, tWCL = 12, tRFC = 312, ProcODT = 53.3Ω.

 

  • Conclusion #1: Dual rank DIMMs (yellow) offered the best performance amongst “set and forget” (light blue, orange, yellow) memory configured automatically by XMP profiles.
  • Conclusion #1a: But the increased overclocking headroom of single rank modules was more than enough to overpower the benefits of rank interleaving, so manually-tuned single rank DDR4-3200 and 3466 won the day (dark blue and green).
  • Conclusion #2: BankGroupSwap should likely be disabled for users that want the best PC gaming performance. As always, test your specific use case.
  • Conclusion #3: Chasing the highest possible clockspeed required timings so relaxed that real world performance suffered versus lower frequencies with tighter timings. This is a fine balance, however, so testing on your platform is always helpful.
  • Conclusion #4: Geardown Mode should likely be disabled if your overclock is stable with a 1T command rate. As always, test your specific use case.

 

We hope these insights prove useful, and we’re looking forward to your feedback. Chat with us on Twitter @AMDRyzen or leave a comment.