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9 Posts authored by: annie.lee Employee

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[Originally posted on 08/30/17.]

 

We were at QuakeCon last week and something caught our eye walking through the BYOC area: a wooden box, carved meticulously to let an orange glow seep into the dark convention center. A few people were standing around it and admiring the rig.

 

The PC belonged to John Lahtinen, a Red Team member. We asked him some questions about the build—check out the PC in more detail below and admire the stunning craftsmanship!

 

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Specs:

  • CPU: Ryzen™ 5 1500X
  • GPU: XFX Radeon™ RX 570
  • Motherboard: ASRock AB350 Gaming-ITX/AC
  • RAM: 16 GB GeIL EVO X RGB DDR4
  • Storage: 480 GB Radeon R7 SSD
  • Power supply: Corsair SF600
  • Fans: APEVIA CF12SL-SOG 120mm Orange (x3)

 

What inspired you to create this build?

 

When Ryzen 7 launched back in March, AMD Red Team Plus members received a sample kit packaged inside a wood box with the Ryzen logo etched on the door. The dimensions, hardware, and logo were almost begging to be converted into an ITX build. Once the AM4 ITX motherboards arrived at retailers, I knew what I wanted to take with me to Quakecon.

 

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What was the most difficult part of the process?

 

Motherboard and GPU mounting were a challenge. Motherboard mounting hole dimensions are just too precise for me to be comfortable with attaching them directly to relatively soft wood. After some determined Google searching, I managed to find what seemed to be a rather ideal solution on the SFF Network forums (https://smallformfactor.net/). An enterprising fellow out of Finland had fabricated a brilliant little modular aluminum ITX frame. I’ll be reviewing this frame (called the NATi Tray) soon, and will be using it again with future wood builds.

 

Unfortunately, it wasn’t smooth-sailing from there. The thickness of the wood in the rear of the case obstructed video cable connection, so out came the dremel! Which was a bit painful when you think you’re so close to completion. And then you discover it isn’t just the wood causing the obstruction, but the thickness of the metal GPU bracket frame as well. Out came the GPU frame.

 

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Where did you get help or what resources did you use?

 

The local Techshop was a fantastic resource for this project. I didn’t have access to or experience with a laser cutter, so I enlisted help from one of the many craftsmen there. I found some truly remarkable projects in the works over there that have spawned ideas for future builds.

 

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Do you remember your first rig? What made you want to put it together?

 

The first rig I built? That was a loooong time ago. It used an AMD K6-2 400 MHz and lasted me many years until I upgraded and passed it along to my sister. It was part desire to have a deeper understanding of the computer and part pragmatism (not wanting to pay someone to fix/upgrade it) that prompted me to go the DIY route. I’ve done DIY builds ever since.

 

What games are you playing on the rig right now? What games/franchises got you into PC gaming?

 

I’m a big FPS guy. The original Doom was the catalyst for my interest in PC gaming. Naturally my gaming last weekend at Quakecon was dominated by id Software games: Quake Champions, Doom, and even some good old Quake II. My obsessions have varied over time- Starcraft, Skyrim, Battlefield 4, and Fallout 4. But these days I typically play a lot of Overwatch and PUBG.

 

Why Radeon?

 

I’ve used so many Radeon GPUs over the years: HD 5770, HD 6950, R9 270X, R9 290, RX 480, and RX 570 – all of them have been outstanding. Supporting inclusive technologies like OpenCL, FreeSync, and Vulkan is important to me. They all equate to better experiences – playing Vulkan Doom on a Freesync monitor all last weekend is absolute proof of that. And of course top-notch Crimson Software with ReLive, which I use frequently for game recording/streaming.

 

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What upcoming PC games are you most excited for?

 

I’m really looking forward to a few that were showcased during this year’s E3: Wolfenstein II, Beyond Good and Evil 2 (for its impressive engine with real-time scaling of multiple galaxies), and Sea of Thieves (how can shooting yourself out of a cannon not be fun?).

 

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Got a Radeon-powered rig you’re proud of? Want to show off your modding skills? Tag us on social media to bring your rig to the spotlight!

 

Interested in joining the Red Team? Find out more about the Red Team community!

 

FOLLOW RADEON

LIKE RADEON ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 09/01/17.]

 

They’re Radeon™ fans, they’re hardcore gamers and they’re enthusiast builders—and they’re the few lucky gamers who won a Radeon RX Vega and had one in their hands before anyone else.

 

From the massive Vega giveaway back in January and our RX Community Tour, four gamers opened their prize packages to see the glimmer of the silver-plated, liquid-cooled Radeon RX Vega 64.

 

We asked them how they felt about winning the Radeon RX Vega before the cards arrived at their doorstep, and they were eager to share their thoughts on the high-end graphics cards.

 

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“The possibilities are endless. Thanks to Vega I can play smoothly in 4K but that’s the obvious part. Then I can choose a 4K monitor much easier because of the FreeSync support. Another thing that I would never try without a proper card is VR but now I have a reason to do that. There are just so many things I could write about and more after I try it with my new build.” –Yan Buyko, Hungary

 

 

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“The most exciting thing about receiving a Radeon RX Vega card is being able to be a part of the technology wave that AMD has unleashed over the past few months. The disruption AMD is bringing to the video and computing arena brings much needed competition in both technology and pricing, it’s a great time to be an AMD fan.” –Breck Anderson, USA

 

 

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“I am extremely excited about not only FINALLY building a computer of my own, but also building one with incredible VR capabilities! We will have a fantastic GPU that will be viable for many years to come and I will never have to borrow a computer again for PDX LAN!” –Ashley Bocaniciu, USA

 

 

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“This is an amazing gift. I’m excited to new Radeon RX Vega graphics technology and performance. I can’t wait to unpack it. :)” –Mateusz Pokrywka, Poland

 

We love seeing gamers so thrilled. If you want to show off your rig, be sure to follow us on our social channels and tag us—we want to see your build!

 

FOLLOW RADEON

LIKE RADEON ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 11/02/17.]

 

A few weeks ago, we sent out this tweet:

 

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Then, proud GPU owners’ photos came flooding in—and we went on a nostalgia trip with these “retro GPUs”. Some of them are only a few years old, but it’s still nice to look back at the cards that once seemed mint and brand-new.

 

Take a look the photos the owners sent of the cards they kept around.

 

@matteopey:

 

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Jarrod (@JarrodsTech)’s MSI R5870:

 

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Stefan (@Misel)’s Rage 128:

 

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Camilo (@MrFusterCluck)’s Sapphire HD 3850:

 

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@Beccdoor‘s HD 3870:

 

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Josh (@joshdalemon)’s HD 4850 Toxic:

 

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Richard (@schlegelrichard)’s MSI X850 XT:

 

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Harry (@cuttsharry123)’s HD 7990 and 9200:

 

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Emilio (@Emilio_ARG)’s HD 5770:

 

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Dave (@Leviathanprim3)’s Radeon 9550:

 

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Øyvind (@Mastromical)’s collection:

 

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Alexander (@grafptitsyn)’s Sapphire HD 4870:

 

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Clint (@Icebug)’s Mach 32:

 

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Stephen O’Brien (@TPJerematic)’s Sapphire HD 2600 Pro:

 

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*All photographs are property of the tagged owner and have been shared with us for this blog.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 06/30/17.]

 

The Radeon™ RX 580 and Radeon™ RX 570 graphics cards have been getting all the spotlight, but what about the rest of the cards in the “Polaris”-based Radeon RX 500 Series family?

 

Today we’re showing some love to the Radeon™ RX 560, an affordable but capable graphics card that packs a lot more pixel-crunching power than you might think. It runs your favorite eSports games without skipping a beat, but it also delivers smooth framerates in more visually demanding AAA titles.

 

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Let’s be real here for a sec… Graphics cards are like our superhero cape. More than any other component, they define both our PC gaming experience and the systems they’re built around. We know our cards inside out—they’re like our weapon of choice, the one we take the most pride in owning. We know how many frames they can hit in certain games, how far we can push those overclocks, and how to keep them running cool inside our rigs.

 

That being said, the Radeon RX 560 is a gem among the RX 500 Series graphics cards—this GPU is capable of pushing hard and overclocking faithfully.

 

We’re gonna take a look at all models using the Radeon RX 560, but today Jason Evangelho took the Sapphire Pulse Radeon RX 560 for a spin along with an AMD Ryzen™ 5 1600X CPU. Here’s a sampling of the framerates he saw across a wide variety of games. (All of these games were played at 1080p.)

 

Here are some of his results:

  • DIRT 4: Medium Quality, 4x MSAA – Average 61 FPS
  • DOOM: Medium Quality, Vulkan API – Average 72 FPS
  • GTA V: High Quality, MSAA X2 – Average 70 FPS
  • Overwatch: Ultra Quality – Average 68 FPS
  • Civilization VI: Medium Quality, DX12 – Average 69 FPS
  • Dota 2: Best Looking – Average 90 FPS
  • Prey: Medium Quality, FXAA – Average 66 FPS
  • Sniper Elite 4: Medium Quality – Average 62 FPS

 

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These are some of today’s most popular titles, and the Radeon RX 560 is more than capable of giving you a fantastic gaming experience. Throw in an affordable Radeon FreeSync™-capable monitor, and you have an awesome hardware combination for smooth, tear-free gaming and very low input lag. Jason saw some great results at Medium settings, and if you bump graphics quality up to High or Ultra for some of these titles, you’ll still get smooth, playable framerates and fantastic visuals.

 

Keep an eye on Radeon.com where we’ll be posting a few more deep dives into the Radeon RX 560. Until then, happy gaming!

 

 

Note: AMD’s product warranty does not cover damages caused by overclocking, even when overclocking is enabled via AMD hardware and/or software. Jason’s results may not be representative of the framerates you may experience, and have not be validated by AMD testing.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

You might’ve already heard this from other places, but this iteration of Forza Horizon is absolutely the most stunning in the series so far. Playground Games and Microsoft Studio raised the bar significantly with Forza Horizon 4, bringing their cars alive with an endless number of customizations, spectacular roads and an intriguing open world with other wandering players.

 

The maps are gorgeous down to the tiniest of details, and sure, you might be driving by so quickly you may not notice what’s on the road. But all of these add up to a create an incredible atmosphere, from the surface glint of your McLaren Senna to the raindrops splattering on your screen—the attention-to-detail game is strong here. The adrenaline immerses you so deeply in this world, at times you wonder if the in-game screenshots aren’t real-life snapshots.

 

Using our Ryzen™ 7 2700X processor, we looked at the performance of our Radeon™ RX graphics cards—here are our recommended settings to play for an average of 60 FPS:

 

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If you’re playing with a Radeon™ RX 560, I recommend you set your baseline setting at High from a 1080p resolution. If you’d like, you can turn off dynamic optimization and go into the advanced settings to tweak a few of the features. The “High” baseline setting will get you an average of 60 FPS, but you can customize the settings below to get a few extra frames.

 

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Forza Horizon 4 also features a handy benchmark mode, one I’ve used several times testing down the stack. You should run it a few times at different settings before starting up your game and see what setting you’re most satisfied with. The mode runs through a few dynamic scenes to check your hardware’s performance, and its final report is highly detailed. Makes me wish all benchmark modes were like this:

 

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To keep those frames smooth throughout, every Radeon™ RX graphics card should be paired with a FreeSync-capable monitor. Take advantage of what your GPU and your display can do together, and make sure FreeSync is enabled under your driver settings and your monitor setting itself—certainly an advantage for a fast-paced game like Forza Horizon 4.

 

When you’ve got all that settled, do a quick check for latest Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition driver downloaded on your system to make sure you’re playing with the latest optimizations.

 

Forza Horizon 4 is available now for PC on the Windows Store. It’s a Forza title that’ll keep you occupied for a while, so share some of your best shots or clips with us using Radeon ReLive on social on @AMDGaming.

 

Annie Lee is Sr. Product Marketing Specialist at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

Call of Duty® is back, and there’s been high anticipation around this one since its announcement—so we’ve been eager to jump into this one.

 

The beloved franchise returns with its familiar multiplayer and zombie modes, but also with a new addition: the battle royale Blackout mode. It brings with it the largest map featured in any Call of Duty game and features characters across the Black Ops series, not to mention excitement among all of us to throw ourselves into a battle royale set in the Call of Duty universe.

 

Treyarch and Activision’s latest title is optimized very well for PC. I tested the Radeon™ RX stack with a Ryzen 7 2700X, and here are our recommended settings to hit an average of 60 FPS at each resolution:

 

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Maintaining a 60 FPS average with your Radeon™ RX graphics card won’t be an issue. Mainstream users with a Radeon™ RX 560 will be able to play this title very well at 1080p, hitting just over 60 FPS at High settings.

 

There are plenty to toy around with under the Graphics setting if you want to extract more frames, as you may lose a few in the more action-heavy scenes. Lowering a few of the texture qualities or post processing effects will help you keep a steady 60 FPS average, depending on which ones you’re okay with decreasing.

 

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Either way, the differences are subtle and lowering some of the features to Medium on a Radeon™ RX 560 isn’t anything dramatic. You’ll hardly notice, as it plays incredibly well overall.

 

You should have your Radeon™ RX graphics card paired with a FreeSync™ capable monitor to keep your images smooth even when your frames dip, so make sure FreeSync is enabled on your driver (or your monitor). Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 also comes ready with support for FreeSync 2 HDR, so if you have a FreeSync 2 HDR monitor you can experience the game with its vivid, brilliant colors through various scenes.

 

 

For Radeon™ RX 570 owners or above, you’ll have no problem hitting a 60+ FPS average at 1080p or 1440p. If you have a Radeon™ RX Vega 56 or 64, you can crank it up to 4K.

 

Whichever Radeon™ RX graphics card you’re equipped with, Activision and Treyarch did a phenomenal job of optimizing the latest Call of Duty iteration on PC. You should also make sure you have our latest driver downloaded, Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.10.1, which includes optimizations for Call of Duty: Black Ops 4.

 

Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 is available now on the Blizzard shop in Standard, Deluxe and Deluxe Enhanced editions.

 

Don’t forget to tag us in a post or two of some of coolest moments at @AMDGaming. We’re keen to see some of those battle royale victories.

 

Annie Lee is Sr. Product Marketing Specialist at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 12/04/17.]

 

If you’re looking for a reliable GPU upgrade, look no further than the Radeon RX™ 550.

 

Whether you’re playing a round of Overwatch or gearing up for a Dota 2 match, the Radeon RX 550 is the card that can transform your PC into a solid eSports gaming machine.

 

Behind the screen, here’s the only thing you should worry about: set your strategies, clear obstacles, attain victory. Inside your machine, the Radeon RX 550 will take care of the rest: pump out stutter-free frames with its FreeSync™-ready capabilities1, boost you through intense moments with Radeon Software and push performance to its limit so you can make every moment of your game count.

 

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I know how crucial every second is when you’re playing a match. The moment the countdown is at 0 and you run to your point to prepare the defense, the worst thing that could happen is losing time—which effectively hands the advantage over to your competition. And that lost split-second could be the deciding factor in your loss.

 

Well, we like to look at life half-full. eSports enthusiasts can’t afford this risk, especially when you’re playing in a tournament with so much at stake. Instead of worrying about a split-second that could tank your game, rely on the Radeon RX 550 graphics card to power your real-time instincts and be a deciding factor in your victory.

 

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To show off the Radeon RX 550’s effortless capabilities, I took the MSI Radeon RX 550 for a spin on some of today’s most popular eSports games. I played all these titles on my AMD Ryzen™ 5 1600X processor powered rig at 1080p.

 

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GameSettingAverage FPS
StarCraft IIUltra70
Quake ChampionsHigh (50% resolution)87
OverwatchHigh60
CS:GOHigh114
Rocket LeagueHigh89
League of LegendsVery High157

 

The Radeon RX 550 is more than capable of delivering the frames needed in these games, so set up that next match: the Radeon RX 550 graphics card’s got you covered.

 

Shop the Radeon RX 550:

NEWEGG

AMAZON

BEST BUY

 

Keep a close eye on more Radeon news and deals on our Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Requires a monitor and AMD Radeon™ graphics, both with FreeSync support. See www.amd.com/freesync for complete details. Confirm capability with your system manufacturer before purchase. GD-127

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[Originally posted on 08/14/17.]

 

You’ve heard us talk about Radeon RX Vega: the next-generation architecture, new geometry engine, high bandwidth cache, 4K gaming, next-level VR and a fantastic ecosystem with Radeon™ FreeSync technology.

 

But now, after unveiling our next high-end generation of Radeon graphics cards at SIGGRAPH 2017, Radeon RX Vega hits shelves today and are now available for enthusiast gamers everywhere.

 

We’ve uncovered the coming extreme gaming era two weeks ago. We showed off the bundles you can get, to enter into a great gaming ecosystem. We’ve shown how others are rallying around Radeon RX Vega. Now, it’s time for you to experience it for yourself.

 

The Choice is Yours

 

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Check the following etailers for the Radeon RX Vega 64  graphics card:

 

Newegg (USA)

 

Amazon (USA)

 

Be sure to check back on this blog for more links.

 

Read up on our available bundles—Radeon Red Pack ($499 USD), Radeon Black Pack ($599 USD) and Radeon Aqua Pack ($699)—if you’re interested in grabbing a full gaming ecosystem along with your Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics card. See the full details on the bundles here.

 

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Show Off Your Station

 

Once you claim a Radeon RX Vega graphics card as your own, you’ll want to show off your rig… and we want to see it.

 

Tag us with your rig on Twitter or Instagram with #RXVega—we’ve entered into this era together, and we want to be a part of this chorus for the next-generation, powerhouse battle stations in the PC gaming space.

 

 

Gear up for tomorrow’s games—learn more about why Radeon RX Vega is the graphics card for you and how it’ll prepare you for this extreme era of PC gaming.

 

Follow Radeon on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for everything Radeon RX Vega-related.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

PDXLAN has been around since July 2003, thriving with a tightly-knit community that’s enthusiastic as ever about getting together in the age of everything-is-online. Enthusiasts know the name very well—the event’s become synonymous with fostering a positive gaming environment, kickass competitions for prizes and its generosity in hosting charity events.

 

A few weeks ago, AMD participated in PDXLAN to celebrate its 15 years of LAN parties.

 

Maybe some of you attend LAN parties or continue with your own, or maybe you prefer gaming online with friends. Either way, you can’t deny the comradery of a LAN party—hooking up your computer, gaming together, helping each other out—that’s what old-school gaming was! PDXLAN keeps that spirit very much alive, and shows no signs of stopping any time soon.

 

We provided PDXLAN with Combat Crates, Ryzen CPUs and Radeon RX GPUs as prizes for the numerous tournaments and competitions the event holds for attendees. With prizes like these on the line, you have no idea how creative people can get…

 

Check out what we were up to at the event, from a hilarious toilet paper cosplay for a chance to win a Radeon RX GPU to seeing up-close some impressive AMD builds we spotted at PDXLAN:

 

 

 

 

If you want to get in on the fun, the next PDXLAN event will be November 9 to 12. Having grown through the years, this event is moving to a more spacious venue with up to 800 participants, making it the largest sole BYOC event in the United States.

 

There are a few seats left since the last time I checked, so if you want to check it out, do so quickly!

 

Annie Lee is a Product & Content Marketing specialist at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.