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21 Posts authored by: annie.lee Employee

AMD’s next high-end graphics card for gaming and content creation has arrived: the RadeonVII, the world’s first 7nm gaming graphics card, hits shelves today.

 

With gaming performance, bandwidth and creation needing more and more memory each year, RadeonVII brings 1 TB/s of memory bandwidth and 16 GB of HBM2 massive memory in as a supercharged “Vega” architecture* to gamers, creators and enthusiasts everywhere. Read the blog on why Radeon® VII with 16 GB of VRAM capacity is a huge benefit for today’s gamers and creators.

 

Take advantage of RadeonVII’s massive memory for super smooth gameplay and content creation:

 

  • Gamers: Experience max resolutions, max framerates and max settings in the latest AAA/esports games and unrestrained streaming**. Pair your experience with a FreeSync 2 HDR technology-capable monitor for a premium buttery-smooth experience.
  • Creators: Push your limits with 8K editing and enhanced real-time performance.

 

For gamers who demand excellence and content creators who need perfection, discover the RadeonVII graphics card now:

 

 

DISCOVER THE RADEON™ VII

 

--

“Vega” is a codename for AMD architectures, and is not a product name. GD-122

 

Testing done by AMD performance labs 1/3/19 on Ryzen 7 2700X,16GB DDR4 3000MHz, Radeon VII, AMD Driver 18.50, and Windows 10. Using Fortnite 1080p Max settings  Radeon VII scored 127 fps. Fortnite 1080p Max settings and HD streaming to Twitch 1080p (1080p @ 60fps, 6 Mbps, AMF encoder) Radeon VII scored 123 fps. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. All scores are an average of 3 runs with the same settings. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-272

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[Originally posted on 08/28/18.]

 

Playing through a period piece is always fun. Playing through a period piece with quirky narration and a defiant sense of adventure through ancient civilizations is even better.

 

Rebellion Developments’ latest title Strange Brigade packs an enormous amount of entertainment, in which you play as one of the daring heroes fighting against the risen Seteki the Witch Queen and her army of mummified monstrosities. You can play solo or with a group in online co-op (1-4 players), but as their YouTube description says, “it’s not all tickety-boo and afternoon tea!”

 

 

With an endless array of puzzles, ruins and treasures to explore, Strange Brigade offers a gripping journey through Egypt in the 1930s. Think Indiana Jones, if Indiana Jones had a charming British narrator commenting on your actions throughout the game (even when you pause—what a sass).

 

Strange Brigade supports both Vulkan and DX12, and we looked at the performance on DX12 to determine what offers a smooth 60 FPS experience:

 

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If you’re using an AMD Radeon™ RX 570 graphics card or above, you’ll get a 60+ FPS average without needing to scale or tweak any of the additional features.

 

If you’re playing on a Radeon RX 560, we recommend keeping it at Medium settings and scaling the extra features as necessary. I paired the Radeon RX 560 with the AMD Ryzen 5™ 2600X and got an average of 66 FPS at Medium, but if you want a few extra frames you can customize the graphics details as you like:

 

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As for processors, we tested the 1080p resolution with a Ryzen 5 2600X and 1440p with Ryzen 7 2700X. We then tested Ryzen across the stack paired with a Radeon RX Vega 64, and they all gave us an average of over 100 FPS on High and over 80 FPS on Ultra – Ryzen 5 2600 and above.

 

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The Ryzen 5 2400G with Vega graphics also offer great playability. If you’re gaming without discrete graphics, you can play at 1080p at Medium and the processor can give you the mid-30s FPS. If you play at a higher memory, you could get close to 40 FPS:

 

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If you ever want to be sure of what your settings will give you, Strange Brigade includes a useful Benchmark mode that you can use prior to entering the game. The mode’s camera pans through a variety of scenes, so that your average framerate will be based on a mix of light and action-oriented scenes.

 

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Happy with your benchmark average? You’re ready to dive in. Strange Brigade is available now, so pick it up on Steam, grab a friend and embark through the treacherous traps and rip-roaring journey.

 

As always, be sure to capture some shots or clips with Radeon ReLive and tag us on @AMDGaming or @Radeon.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 07/12/18.]

 

Whether you’re getting in a practice match or playing for high stakes, you can’t afford to lose any seconds in League of Legends. In our efforts to bring more performance to the players, we took a took at how you can extract the most out of your AMD hardware when playing League of Legends.

 

We paired AMD’s new Ryzen™ 7 2700X with Radeon GPUs down the stack. Rushing around as Ahri, I threw myself into action-heavy scenes to see how far the Ryzen + Radeon™ RX combo could go.

 

Even as I switched out the graphics cards, I kept the maxed-out settings unchanged at Very High playing on a 1440p resolution. Steady and impressive framerates, no matter which GPU I used with the Ryzen 7 2700X!

 

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I had no trouble getting 140+ FPS on any of the graphics cards I used at 1440p. When you’re playing with a Radeon RX 550 or 560, you can get impressive framerates playing at 1080p—but our Ryzen 7 2700X worked diligently so we didn’t lose any crucial frames even when you crank up the resolution.

 

 

Playing with Radeon Software features makes it even better. With the Radeon RX 550 on 1080p at Very High settings, Radeon Chill saves up to 25% of power consumption1 while Enhanced Sync gives you up to 46% faster response time2. By the time you get to the frenzied part of a match, these are features that can help push you past the victory line.

 

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While it’s nice and dandy to play with the remarkable Ryzen 7 2700X with our Radeon RX graphics cards, check that you’re playing with the latest Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition for the latest updates and optimizations.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of April 28th, 2018 on the 2GB Radeon™ RX 550, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 7700X CPU (4.2 GHz), 16GB DDR4-3000 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. With the very high preset on League of Legends® at 1920x1080, the Radeon™ RX 550 consumed 28.279 watts with Radeon™ Chill enabled whereas the Radeon™ RX 550 scored 37.559 watts with Radeon™ Chill disabled, lowering power consumption by 25% in League of Legends®. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-235
  2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of April 28th, 2018 on the 2GB Radeon™ RX 550, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 7700X CPU (4.2 GHz), 16GB DDR4-3000 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. With the very high preset on League of Legends® at 1920x1080, with Enhanced Sync ON the Radeon™ RX 550 scored 65.0 milliseconds from click to response with Radeon™ Software 18.4.1 whereas the Radeon™ RX 550 scored 120 milliseconds from click to response, with VSync, creating a 46% faster response time in League of Legends®. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-234

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[Originally posted on 04/25/18.]

 

Four days of games, prizes and panels—thousands descended upon Boston for PAX East on April 4 to 8, which meant each day was filled to the brim of passionate fans hopping from booth to booth inside the gigantic Boston Convention Centre.

 

Throughout the four days, we ran the FreeSync™ Challenge where attendees tried the setup for a chance to win the ultrawide Samsung CHG90, a beastly 49” FreeSync-capable monitor.

 

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We had 666 total attendees try the Challenge (yes, we counted and double-checked—it’s 666), which was set up with two identical systems—except one monitor had FreeSync™ enabled, while the other didn’t. An overwhelming majority of attendees (585/666 or 88%) said they preferred playing on the system with the FreeSync-capable monitor1.

 

After tallying all attendees who tried the Challenge, we’re excited to announce the randomly chosen winner to walk away with a brand new monitor:

 

Robb Armstrong from Massachusetts

 

Congratulations on your gorgeous, new monitor!

 

We asked him for a comment on his new prize, and he sent over his thoughts: “I’m honestly in awe in regards to the monitor. Going from a dual monitor setup to this widest of ultrawides will take some getting used to, but games playing in its native resolution look out of this world.”

 

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A huge thank you to all who participated!

 

Take a look at our gallery below from our four days at PAX East. Thank you to all who came by the booth and talked with us—we look forward to meeting up with other AMD fans at future events!

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Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. In an informal total random sample of 666 people conducted by AMD between 4/5-4/8, 2018 at PAX East in Boston MA. A blind test was conducted with two identical systems running Far Cry 5 Ultra settings @ 1440p: AMD Ryzen™ 5 1400, 8GB DDR4 memory, Radeon™ RX 580, Radeon Software 18.3.4 and Windows 10 (64bit). Radeon Freesync Monitor: AOC AGON AG271QX. 2560x1440. Each test ran 2 minutes. 585 people preferred the Radeon FreeSync™ enabled system, while 81 people preferred the Non-Radeon FreeSync system. In percentages, 88% preferred the Radeon FreeSync system, 12% preferred the Non-Radeon FreeSync system. All participants received AMD promotional material. GRT-14

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[Originally posted on 03/05/18.]

 

This month, we’re spotlighting a build we found while browsing Reddit. Pieced together by Phil John, the Radeon™ RX 560-powered PC played a special role in a learning process: a collaborative project with his son learning to build PCs for the first time.

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Specs:

  • CPU: Ryzen™ 3 1200
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-AB350-M Gaming 3
  • Case: Bitfenix Nova
  • GPU: Sapphire Radeon RX 560 Pulse OC 4096MB
  • PSU: Corsair TX-650M
  • SSD: Crucial MX300 275GB
  • HDD: Toshiba P300 1TB 7200RPM
  • RAM: CORSAIR Vengeance LPX DDR4 2400 MHz PC RAM – 4 GB x 2

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What inspired you to put this build together?

 

I’ve built many PCs over the years, starting off with a Cyrix 386, and later using some classic chips such as the Athlon™ XP 1800+ and the Athlon™ 64. My son has been an avid computer gamer for several years and is starting to show an interest in programming, so he asked for the parts to build a computer for Christmas.

 

We approached it as a father-son project and spent all of Christmas day building it, first outside the case, and then installing it all. It was a fantastic learning experience for him as I could impart all the little things you often get wrong when doing your first build.

 

I never considered buying a pre-built machine for him as I feel that learning how a computer is put together, and what all the different parts do, is an important piece of knowledge, rather than just seeing them as a black box with mysterious components.

 

What was the most difficult part of the process?

 

The most difficult part of the experience was getting it to POST! It turns out the motherboard had a very early BIOS on board that didn’t fully support the memory we had originally – it’s a real credit to AMD that BIOS updates have been so frequent, as once we knew what the problem was, a quick flash from a USB stick got everything working perfectly.

 

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Rather than being a problem though, it was another great educational process – we ran through troubleshooting steps to find out what the problem was.

 

Apart from that, the whole process was very simple – building a computer shouldn’t be some scary process that only experts can do, with some research and patience anyone can do it, and often get a better deal than buying a pre-built system.

 

Do you remember the first PC you built? What inspired you to start building?

 

Vividly! When I was younger we had a Sinclair ZX-80 and then Commodore 128 – which is what I started programming on. Eventually I outgrew that and PCs were coming into their own, so components were purchased (including a very fetching beige case) and everything put together.

 

It was a Cyrix 386 running at a whopping 33Mhz with a 40MB HDD (which I double-spaced to roughly 80). It also had the feature where you could slow it down to 4Mhz to support old games without proper timing in the main loop so they were playable. I seem to remember it having 4MB of memory, but it’s so long ago that might not be correct any more!

 

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The first proper gaming PC I built was an Athlon XP 1800+ paired with an ATI 9000 series GPU. Back then, it was all about Grand Theft Auto 3 and America’s Army for me, which both ran very well on that setup.

 

Inspiration wise, it was always about being able to customise what went into the computer, not being stuck with the components that Gateway or similar decided to put in there. There’s also a great sense of accomplishment when you press that power button for the first time and see it booting!

 

Why did you choose Ryzen and Radeon?

 

I’ve always been an AMD fan and have always looked to them first when putting a new build together. Once Ryzen was released, especially the lower end 3 series, it really was a no-brainer when it came to deciding on parts. The value offered and all the great features in the B350 chipset, such as unlocked overclocking, are so builder and enthusiast-friendly that it’s hard to choose anything else, certainly not in the same price bracket.

 

The quality of drivers is also a strong point for AMD. I’ve got a Radeon™ RX 480 in my main rig and the performance improvements I’ve enjoyed thanks to AMD “FineWine” have been very noticeable. For this build, the choice was between the Radeon™ RX 560 and the competition’s comparable card. If my son starts looking at GPGPU I’d also want him to look first to OpenCL® rather than the proprietary alternatives.

 

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I wanted something dependable and every Radeon card I’ve had has always been that – it’s so important for lots of things from Windows to gaming that putting something in there that won’t have problems down the line is important.

 

What will this build be used for / what games?

 

It’s a multi-purpose computer – my son enjoys gaming, but it’s also used for homework, music production (with my old Korg synthesiser linked up through a MIDI interface) and learning to program, so lots of competing factors, some favouring the GPU, others the CPU – it has to be able to handle them all.

 

My son is mad about rollercoasters, so his primary game at the moment is Planet Coaster; it’s amazing seeing all the wonderful coasters he’s designed, even if some of them would make me quite sick in real life! He also enjoys some indie titles like Mini Metro, Bridge Builder and Terraria. Finally, Minecraft … which I think most 10 year old boys are mad about.

 

What games are you currently playing? Which upcoming ones are you most excited for?

 

I’ve got a somewhat varied taste in games, from FPS shooters like Wolfenstein: New Colossus to DOOM (which both run fantastically on Radeon GPUs) to driving sims like Dirt Rally, Assetto Corsa and Project Cars 2 – none of which make my Radeon RX 480 even break a sweat at 1080p high settings. Finally, open world third-person games … who doesn’t like a bit of mindless mischief in the GTA universe?

 

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As for upcoming games, the one I’m most looking forward to is Far Cry 5 – the setting and atmosphere look amazing, and looks like it’s going to be a great example of the immersive experience that typifies a really good long-form story-based PC game.

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Do you want to share your build story? Tag us on social media — we’re always looking for cool stories on Radeon builds.

 

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Information contained in this blog represents the view of AMD or the third party presenter as of the date presented. AMD and/or the third party presenters have no obligation to update any forward-looking content in the above presentations. AMD is not responsible for the content of any 3rd party statements and does not necessarily endorse the comments made therein. GD-84

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 03/28/18.]

 

I’ve been waiting for a game like Far Cry 5: it’s thoughtful, chaotic and fun, and for the life of me, I cannot stop playing it.

 

You’d think a game that centers around a cult and its intimidating leader would be dark, and it does have its serious moments (given that the cult’s looming threat follows you wherever you go). But there are also plenty of light characters and hilarious moments that made me think: is this really happening?!

 

After rescuing Boomer (which you can see in our Let’s Play video), I had an intense urge to go back into Hope County. Here are my five most memorable moments from playing the first few hours.

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5. Face-to-Face with Joseph Seed

 

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Joseph Seed is intimidating. I can’t place exactly what it is: the shades? The man bun? The seven deadly sins carved everywhere on his chest? Ubisoft did a fantastic job building up his character before we even meet him in-game, and there’s a culminating dread by the time you meet him face-to-face.

 

What’s frightening about the Father is that when you first meet him and arrest him, he goes along with it: he doesn’t struggle, he doesn’t yell, he doesn’t fight. His calm and collected demeanor speaks to an incredible yet frightening confidence that things will go his way.

 

Although you explore Hope County building up the Resistance against the cult, you can feel his hold across the entire county. Even when he’s not around, his presence is omniscient—and that’s what makes Joseph Seed terrifying and that first meeting with him unforgettable.

 

4. Rescuing Boomer

 

 

Boomer is very much America’s good boy! If you’re a dog person, the moment you rescue Boomer is going to fill you with joy and love as it did for me. Not only is having a four-legged companion awesome, but Boomer is extremely valuable: he steals enemies’ weapons and revives you when you’re down.

 

You can watch our mission to rescue Boomer here, where you can see my shamelessly-fangirl reaction to recruiting our dog.

 

The best thing about Boomer as your companion is that he wants your love as any man’s best friend would, so make sure to give him a pat on the head every once in a while and remind him what a good boy he is for fighting the Resistance.

 

3. Flying Planes, Driving “Widowmaker” and Anything Vehicle-Related

 

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I can’t choose one, here. Driving anything in Far Cry 5 is hella fun (maybe it has something to do with the fact that I don’t drive in real life—my license expired, okay?), but this game takes driving to a whole other level.

 

You want to do a barrel roll? Done. Drive a huge truck with machine guns named Widowmaker? Do it. Chase a green-and-purple machine gun jeep called Death Wish? Mandatory. Forget gunning down the cult members in a sedan—do it in style. Sometimes, your Guns for Hire will even hop in with you and take care of passing-by cult members so you can focus on the road.

 

Hope County is huge. Sure, you can go from region to region on foot if you want, but Far Cry 5 makes it fun to cover vast distances by allowing you to pretty much drive anything.

 

2. Traveling through Montana

 

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I’ve never visited Montana, but I sure want to now. Creative director Dan Hay and lead writer Drew Holmes spoke extensively about the inspiration they drew from real-life Montana to create a realistic Hope County. You can see it in the details: lush grass, clear skies and luminous mountains in the background trail you everywhere you go.

 

Hope County really is a beautiful place, and at times I’d lose myself in thought while driving down the roads. You may be kept busy rescuing civilians and destroying cult properties as you venture, but don’t forget to take in the picturesque sights and appreciate how far graphics have come!

 

1. Rescuing Cheeseburger

 

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Cheeseburger, the diabetic bear whose diet consists mostly of salmon—the quest to grab him as a Fang for Hire opens after you liberate F.A.N.G Center, the animal center where the cult’s been training wolves to help do their dirty deeds.

 

Recruiting Cheeseburger begins with a fishing trip. He likes salmon. So you have to go and catch salmon. Then you have to give him said salmon. After stopping the cult from taking him, Cheeseburger joins your roster to fight the cult—and he might just come close to Boomer as the best companion. I can’t choose! He’s fierce, terrifying and loveable: the perfect combination for a Resistance partner.

 

A+ for his adorable cheeseburger-patterned collar.

 

Bonus: The Testy Festy

 

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The “Testy Festy” is quite possibly the best side-quest I’ve ever played in any video game, period. It is exactly what it sounds like: a testicle festival, a joyous occasion in Hope County that’s unfortunately been stalled due to cult activities in the region, and it’s up to you to start it back up and bring the party back after you liberate Fall’s End.

 

I won’t spoil too much here, but you should go for this mission as soon as it becomes available. Let’s just say it starts off with delivering an amusing “Testicle Festival”-branded trailer to hunting down some crucial items set to a sexy, mood-setting song.

 

And yes, you get to partake in the festival.

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There you have it. I’m nowhere near done this game, so by no means is this a complete list—I’m sure I’ll find plenty of things that’ll expand this list to a top 10, top 20.

 

If you’ve played Far Cry 5, what are your favorite moments in the game? If you haven’t, be sure to pick up the game and start your Resistance against the cult!

 

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Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 01/18/18.]

 

We’re always curious to hear from gamers, especially on your superb gaming experiences powered by Radeon™ RX graphics cards. We sent a handful of gamers and streamers some Radeon RX GPUs last year to see what games they were playing—they have thriving communities of their own, so browse through their comments and follow them to see what they’re up to.

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MissesMae

 

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My name is Mae. I’m a 30 year old nurse turned full time gamer/broadcaster. I’ve been a content creator on YouTube for 6 years and have been a partnered broadcaster on Twitch for 4 years.

 

What MissesMae is Playing

 

I’m really into FPS and shooters in general. The current games I’m playing are Tom Clancy’s Rainbow Six Siege1, Call of Duty: World War II2 and Fortnite Battle Royale3.

 

Playing on Radeon

 

Since I started using the Radeon RX Vega4, there were less screen tearing on the games that I play.

 

Follow MissesMae

 

You can find me on Twitch nearly everyday or catch my live stream highlights on my YouYube.

 

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SydSoGood

 

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I’ve played games for as long as I can remember, whether it was Kirby on N64 or Pokemon, but my dad sat me down and taught me how to play Halo:CE. So it was very fitting that my first stream was playing the original Destiny on release day in September 2014.

 

Video games has had such a positive impact on my life and source of meeting wonderful people. My goal since I started is to create a safe, supportive community that happens to be full of super rad people who enjoy playing games and watching me play games.

 

What SydSoGood is Playing

 

I definitely lean towards first person shooters, but I’m currently playing Call of Duty: WWII, Fortnite, PUBG5, occasionally League of Legends6, and just finished up Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus7 for my YouTube channel.

 

Playing on Radeon

 

Radeon RX 570 made THE BIGGEST difference for sure. My computer went from running at a 4 to a 10 just by swapping that in. I also have the AMD Ryzen8, which makes a load of difference.

 

Previously, I was only able to stream console games because my PC couldn’t handle me playing and streaming from it, but now that’s never an issue so it’s nice to be able to pull up a game and not have to think about how I’m gonna stream it because my PC can take anything that I throw at it.

 

When Destiny 29 came out on PC that was such a game changer. I don’t usually play shooters on PC (mainly because I’m so incompetent trying to aim with a mouse and keyboard), but couldn’t help myself because of how great it ran on my computer.

 

Follow SydSoGood

 

I stream Mondays, Wednesdays, and Sundays at 6:30p PT // 9:30p ET on Twitch and upload Let’s Plays on Tuesdays and Thursdays and vlogs on Saturdays!

 

Here’s where you can find me on the internet:

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Cowsep

 

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I’ve always wanted to stream – but back at my rural Indiana home the best we could get was dial-up internet. Then when I moved to Korea in 2012 as an English teacher, I was finally able to start streaming thanks to the Korean internet.

 

I’ve been a full-time streamer since 2014, streaming mostly League of Legends and producing YouTube content with highlights from my stream, as well as some occasional guides and goofs.

 

What Cowsep is Playing

 

Playing mostly League of Legends, but I do occasionally dive into other games after the main stream or between LoL queues.

 

Last year I started playing Summoners War on my phone due to a sponsorship, and I have actually been addicted to the game since.

 

I do also very much enjoy playing around in VR with my Oculus Rift, but I have been unable to fully stream this before getting the Radeon RX Vega4.

 

Playing on Radeon

 

Playing League with the Radeon RX Vega has been flawless. It has actually drastically impacted my streaming too.

 

I run a bunch of custom OBS plugins and overlays on my stream that utilizes a lot of onscreen sprites and particle effects for various events (subscriptions, donations, etc.) and these have been drastically improved on the Radeon RX Vega.

 

I can now run my custom overlay setup, play League and still work on my own game in Unity and Blender at the same time without dropping a single frame.

 

I also tried out the Radeon RX Vega for my VR setup and it has been great. With my previous cards, I was not able to stream VR in 1080p 60fps without dropping a lot of frames. Now I can stream my VR experience too.

 

Follow Cowsep

 

I’m streaming every single day on Twitch: https://twitch.tv/cowsep

 

We release videos regularly throughout the week: https://youtube.com/cowsep

 

Earlier this year I started learning game development with Unity – and I have been very much into it. I am currently working on my own game named Pathtale!

 

I visit pretty much all local gaming events in Korea and I can always be found at TwitchCon and the occasional PAX in the US!

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Becky Taylor

 

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I’m a successful Marketing Manager within the video game industry. I currently work at Riot Games as the Influencer Relations Manager. In the past, I’ve worked with Reboot Game Developer Conferences, Innervate (Gamesight), 3D Realms, Tencent Boston, and Signal Studios. My history with video games started at a young age when I started building computers with my father in 1994. I grew up kicking *** on games such as Doom, Heretic, Half-Life, and Quake.

 

What Becky is Playing

 

Currently playing PUBG, of course. Also a lot of Warframe10 and Civ 611.

 

Playing on Radeon

 

The Radeon RX Vega means that I can play my games on max graphics and still have high frame rates. Games are sexy and smooth!

 

Follow Becky

 

People can mainly find me on Twitter at @omglazerkittens.

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SeltzerPlease

 

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I’ve been a fan of Twitch and Justin.tv since the early days of eSports broadcasting on the platform, and I’m a frequent sight hosting and interviewing at competitive gaming events. Most recently this summer, I’ve covered the Overwatch World Cup in Beijing and Los Angeles, Pokémon GO Fest in Chicago, the Hearthstone Championship Tour at Gamescom in Germany, Tokyo Game Show in Japan, the BlizzCon All Access Channel, Hulu’s show Player vs Player, and E3, PAX East, PAX West, New York Comic Con, and TwitchCon on behalf of Twitch.

 

Playing on Radeon

 

When I’m not traveling to cover the wide world of eSports, I enjoy multiplayer shooters like Overwatch12. In my recent years, I’ve discovered the joy of strategy games like Civilization and Divinity13, and relaxing single-player adventures like Stardew Valley14 – all of which make great use of the Vega and massive curved FreeSync monitor in both detail and refresh-rate.

 

Follow Rachel

 

You can catch me covering CS:GO15 this January in Stockholm and lots of other video gaming and eSports events all year long! The best way to keep up with me is Twitter.com/SeltzerPlease!

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Elisa Melendez

 

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I’ve been gaming since I was old enough to hold a controller (shout-out to Pinball Quest and Anticipation on the NES!), but I got inspired to stream a few years ago as part of promo work I was doing for the original Rocksmith16. I fell in love with the game, and Rocksmith streams happen every Monday night to this day!

 

What Elisa’s Playing

 

Right now, I’m working my way through Super Mario Odyssey17 and am looking forward to taking The Sims 4’s Cats & Dogs18 expansion for a whirl. Of course, I’m still playing and streaming Rocksmith 2014 Remastered every week!

 

Playing on Radeon

 

Having the “Vega” in my life and learning PC building as part of our Streaming PC Building panel at this past TwitchCon was an eye-opening experience. Building your PC is more accessible than ever—and it’s not as intimidating as it might seem. I highly recommend building your own.

 

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Follow Elisa

 

If you’re interested in learning more about music, playing guitar or bass, or just want to listen to a couple of musicians being goofballs, you can check out our Rocksmith and music streams over at twitch.tv/elisarockdoc Monday and Tuesday nights at 6 PM PT/9 PM PT.

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Share your experience with us! What games are you playing on your Radeon RX graphics card?

 

Don’t forget to keep up with us on social media:

FOLLOW RADEON ON TWITTER

LIKE RADEON ON FACEBOOK

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Information contained in this blog represents the view of AMD or the third party presenter as of the date presented. AMD and/or the third party presenters have no obligation to update any forward-looking content in the above presentations. AMD is not responsible for the content of any 3rd party statements and does not necessarily endorse the comments made therein. GD-84

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. © 2017 Ubisoft Entertainment. All Rights Reserved. Tom Clancy’s, Rainbow Six, the Soldier Icon, Uplay, the Uplay logo, Ubi.com, Ubisoft, and the Ubisoft logo are trademarks of Ubisoft Entertainment in the US and/or other countries.
  2. © 2018 Activision Publishing, Inc. ACTIVISION, CALL OF DUTY, and CALL OF DUTY WWII are trademarks of Activision Publishing, Inc.
  3. © 2018, Epic Games, Inc. Epic, Epic Games, the Epic Games logo, Fortnite, the Fortnite logo, Unreal, Unreal Engine 4 and UE4 are trademarks or registered trademarks of Epic Games, Inc. in the United States of America and elsewhere. All rights reserved.
  4. Radeon RX Vega 64. For more information, go to https://gaming.radeon.com/en/product/vega/radeon-rx-vega-64
  5. COPYRIGHT ©2017 PUBG CORPORATION. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PLAYERUNKNOWN'S BATTLEGROUNDS and PUBG are registered trademarks, trademarks or service marks of PUBG.
  6. © 2017 Riot Games, Inc. All rights reserved. Riot Games, League of Legends and PvP.net are trademarks, services marks, or registered trademarks of Riot Games, Inc.
  7. © 2018 ZeniMax Media Inc. Developed in association with MachineGames. MachineGames, Bethesda, Bethesda Softworks, ZeniMax and related logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of ZeniMax Media Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries. Wolfenstein®, the W (stylized) and related logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of id Software LLC in the U.S. and/or other countries. All other trademarks or trade names are the property of their respective owners. All Rights Reserved.
  8. AMD Ryzen 5 1400. For more information, go to https://www.amd.com/en/products/cpu/amd-ryzen-5-1400
  9. © 2018 Bungie, Inc. All rights reserved. Destiny, the Destiny Logo, Bungie and the Bungie Logo are among the trademarks of Bungie, Inc. Published and distributed by Activision. Activision is a registered trademark of Activision Publishing, Inc. Activision makes no guarantee regarding the availability of online play or features, and may modify or discontinue online services at its discretion without notice at any time. Using the software constitutes acceptance of the Destiny Software License Agreement available at http://support.activision.com/license and the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy available at http://www.bungie.net/eula. All other trademarks and trade names are the properties of their respective owners.
  10. ©2017 Digital Extremes Ltd. All rights reserved. Warframe and the Warframe logo are registered trademarks of Digital Extremes Ltd. The 'PS' Family logo is a registered trademark and 'PS4' is a trademark of Sony Computer Entertainment, LLC.
  11. ©2016 Take-Two Interactive Software and its subsidiaries. Sid Meier's Civilization, Civilization, Civ, 2K, Firaxis Games, Take-Two Interactive Software and their respective logos are all trademarks of Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. All other marks and trademarks are the property of their respective owners. All rights reserved.
  12. ©2018 BLIZZARD ENTERTAINMENT, INC. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. All trademarks referenced herein are the properties of their respective owners.
  13. Copyrights © Larian Studos. All rights reserved. All company names, brand names, trademarks and logos are the property of their respective owners.
  14. COPYRIGHT 2012-2017 CHUCKLEFISH LTD
  15. © 2018 Valve Corporation, all rights reserved. Valve, the Valve logo, Source, the Source logo, Steam, the Steam logo, Counter-Strike, and the Counter-Strike logo are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of the Valve Corporation.
  16. © 2013 Ubisoft Entertainment. All Rights Reserved. Rocksmith logo, Ubi.com, Ubisoft, and the Ubisoft logo are trademarks of Ubisoft Entertainment in the US and/or other countries.
  17. © 2018 Nintendo. Games are property of their respective owners. Nintendo of America Inc. Headquarters are in Redmond, Washington
  18. © 2017 Electronic Arts Inc.

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[Originally posted on 08/10/18.]

 

Capcom’s highly anticipated Monster Hunter: World is finally out on PC, much to the rejoice of keyboard-and-mouse hunters around the world. Hunting, looting, crafting—what’s not to love about taking down some monumental beasts while beefing up your own armor?

 

For AMD users, diving into this world means being prepared with our latest 18.8.1 driver which is optimized for Monster Hunter: World.

 

Here are Capcom’s recommended AMD settings to run the game at 1080p/30FPS:

CPUGPU
Minimum, Low settingAMD FX 6300Radeon™ R7 260x (VRAM 2GB)
Recommended, High settingAMD Ryzen™ 5 1500XRadeon™ RX 570 (VRAM 4GB)

 

If you want to push beyond 30FPS for a close or steady 60FPS on your AMD graphics card, here are our recommended settings (system specs1):

 

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Radeon RX 560 owners, fret not. You’ll have to scale down the resolution and settings, but I was still able to get a nice FPS average of mid-50s, hitting 60 and slightly over at times, running around with my kickass Long Sword. Make sure you go into Advanced Graphics settings and set Resolution Scaling to “Mid”, as well as scaling down the other features to “Mid”. Add a Radeon FreeSync™ monitor to your setup for smooth frames, and you’re set.

 

If you want to play at a higher resolution at 1440p, you should play on a Radeon RX Vega graphics cardfor the best experience:

 

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If you have a monitor capable of pushing 144hz, max out that refresh rate. Bonus points if you have a Radeon FreeSync monitor, which will give you an extra boost for that buttery smooth gameplay while hunting down that evasive Kulu-Ya-Ku.

 

Want to play around a bit for some extra frames? You’ll have to change your resolution and main graphics setting in the main menu, with the option to tweak features like anti-aliasing in-game. You can only change these settings in the main menu, so check these out before you enter the game:

 

  • Texture quality
  • Ambient occlusion
  • LOD bias
  • Subsurface scattering
  • Screen space reflection
  • Dynamic range

 

If you want to squeeze out a few more frames from your base settings, you can scale down features like texture, volume rendering, anti-aliasing and/or anisotropic filtering.

 

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You can also shut off foliage sway, subsurface scattering, screen space reflection and water reflection completely or a mixture of them if these details don’t matter as much to you. Personally, I like the immersion of these little details.

 

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As for your processor, we took a quick look with the Ryzen 6 2600X and Ryzen 7 2700X2 paired with a Radeon RX Vega 64. Monster Hunter: World runs well on both at 1080p, High setting – roaming around the first mission, the Ryzen 5 2600X gave us a nice average of 87 FPS and the Ryzen 7 2700X ran at an average of 95 FPS. At the Highest setting, we got an average of 71 and 78 FPS respectively.

 

If you’re sporting our feisty Ryzen 5 2400G with Radeon RX Vega graphics, there’s some ways for you to play around with the settings as well. As long as you’re willing to compromise on a few minor tweaks, you’ll get a nice playable experience on this processor that’s no less immersive in the New World:

 

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Once your settings are good to go, you’re good to start questing. Don’t forget to download the latest driver if you haven’t done so: 18.8.1 is packed with optimizations for Monster Hunter: World.

 

Be sure to take some screenshots or recorded gameplay of your hunt in action with Radeon ReLive, and tag us at @Radeon or @AMDGaming.

 

Happy hunting!

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. System specs: Windows 10 Enterprise, AMD Ryzen 7 2700X (3.70GHz), 16GB DDR4-3200MHz, Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.8.1
  2. System specs: Windows 10 Enterprise, Radeon RX Vega 64, 16GB DDR4-3200MHz, Radeon Pro Software Adrenalin Edition 18.8.1

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[Originally posted on 04/07/17.]

 

For the past few months, we’ve been putting the spotlight on our fans for their Radeon-powered rigs—but what’s in our own?

 

We wanted to throw the spotlight on a few of our own, so rounded up some staff members at AMD to share what they have inside their PCs.

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Luís Peralta

Graphics and Web Designer

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Almost YInMn Blue RIG:

  • Monitor: ASUS PB287Q 4K
  • Case: NZXT H440 Black/Blue
  • CPU: i7-4790K
  • Board: ASRock z97 Extreme6
  • GPU: Sapphire R9 Fury X
  • SSD: Samsung SM951 AHCI m.2 256Gb
  • HDD: 2x Western Digital Black 1TB (raid0)
  • Cables: Black/Blue Sleeved Cables (power, board and pcie)
  • RAM: Corsair Vengeance PRO 2x8Gb 1833Mhz CL9
  • PSU: Corsair HX850i
  • Cooler: Corsair H110i GTX
  • Temperature manager: Corsair Link Commander Mini
  • RGB light: Corsair Link RGB LED Kit
  • Internal USB adapter: NZXT IU01
  • Keyboard: Ozone Blade
  • Headset: Ozone RAGE 7HX
  • Mouse: Razer Mamba 2012
  • Pad: Belkin n52te with Razer Synapse (very old, but still working)

 

My rig story is simple: Needed to update my work PC to keep following Star Citizen development. Having windows booting from a M.2 Gen3 PCIe x4 SSD was mandatory, that alone required board, cpu and ram update. Fury X was the chosen card to display the 4K beauty from Star Citizen. 1TB SSDs were not viable ($$$) back then, so for media storage I’ve gone with the best HDDs on market and installed them in raid0 config for twice the speed. Last, but not least, to do some minor OC on the CPU, I’ve got the Corsair Commander Mini, that alone monitors temperature (in both components and thermometers inside the case), controls all the case, psu and cpu cooler fans, and even controls the RGB light stripes. All that in a blue/black setup.

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Phil Park,

SMTS Design Engineer

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Paw-Power RIG:

  • CPU: Ryzen 7 1700X
  • MB: Gigabyte GA-AB350 Gaming 3
  • RAM: 16 GB (2×8 GB) G.Skill Ripjaws V DDR4-3200 14-14-14-34
  • Case: Corsair Carbide Series 200R ATX mid tower
  • GPU: XFX Radeon 480 8 GB
  • Power: EVGA 80+ Gold 650W ATX
  • Storage: Crucial MX300 1TB SSD M.2 2280 (SATA)
  • Cooler: Corsair Hydro H60

 

Even though I’ve worked on nearly every AMD CPU, this is the system I’ve been most excited about building (like I mentioned online, I’ve waited years for this day to come). When I received the parts, I told my wife that I’d wait until the weekend to finish building the system. That only lasted for 30 minutes…

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Simon Ng,
Product Manager

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Oldie But A Goodie RIG:

  • CPU: Phenom II X6 1060T
  • Motherboard: A3
  • RAM: 8GB DDR3
  • Case: Antec 900
  • GPU: Radeon R9 290X
  • PSU: Antec 850W
  • Storage: WS Black 1TB

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Gilbert Leung,

Technical Marketing Specialist

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Gotta Catch ‘Em All RIG:

  • CPU: Intel 3930k @ 5.0 GHz
  • RAM: Corsair Vengeance Pro 32 GB Quad Channel @ 2400 MHz CL11
  • Motherboard: Asus Rampage IV Extreme
  • GPU: Radeon Fury X (Secret Overclock)
  • Case: Modified TJ07 (ColdZero/MurderMod)
  • Cooling: Swiftech eXtremePerformance Quad 120mm Radiator + Swiftech MCP35X Pump + EK Supreme LT CPU Block + Scythe Gentle Typhoon AP-29 (3000 RPM) fans in Pull
  • PSU: Corsair AX1200

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Jake Francis
Software Engineering Technician

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Industrial Power Bill RIG:

  • CPU: AMD Ryzen 1700 OC 3.9GHz 1.35v
  • Cooler: Noctua NH-D15 AM4
  • Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-X370-GAMING 5
  • RAM: Corsair 16GB DDR4 3200MHz
  • GPU: 2x R9 FuryX CF 1100/575
  • Storage: Samsung EVO 1TB SSD x2
  • Storage: Radeon R7 480GB SSD
  • PSU: Corsair AX860i Platinum
  • Case: NZXT H440
  • Keyboard: Corsair K70 RapidFire
  • Mouse: Logitech G430 Wireless
  • Mousepad: Nixeus Type-R
  • Headphones: Beyerdynamic Custom One Pro Plus
  • DAC: Danon USB300
  • Mic: AudioTechnica ATR2500
  • BenQ XL2730z 1440p 144Hz FreeSync
  • 2x Nixeus Vue-24 1080p 144Hz FreeSync

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Liam Gallagher
Software Product Marketing

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I Haz Purring Effectz RIG:

  • CPU: i5-4590
  • GPU: MSI Twin Frozr RX 480 4GB
  • RAM: 16GB DDR3 @ 2133MHz
  • Boot Drive: 256GB OCZ ARC 100
  • Storage Drive: 256GB OCZ ARC 100 & Toshiba 2TB HDD
  • Monitor: Acer 1440p 144Hz FreeSync (XG270H)
  • Headset: Philips SHP9500S
  • Mic: AudioTechnica AT2035
  • Interface: M.AUDIO Mobile Pre
  • Keyboard: Azio MGK1
  • Mouse: Mad Catz R.A.T 9

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Jason Evangelho
Sr. Technical Marketing Specialist

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LOGO. RIG:

  • Intel Core i7 5960x
  • MSI Gaming X99 AC motherboard
  • 16GB G.Skill Ripjaws DDR4 2400MHz
  • AMD Radeon Fury X
  • NZXT Kraken X61 CPU Cooler
  • NZXT Noctis 450 Case
  • Samsung Evo 840 1TB SSD
  • WD 2TB Caviar Black
  • Corsair RM 850W PSU

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Dmitry Shatrov

ASIC/Layout Design Engineer

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Red-Eyed Beast. RIG:

  • CPU: Intel core i5 4690K
  • Motherboard: Asus Z97-AR
  • RAM: Patriot Viper 8GB (2 x 4gb) 1866mhz CL9
  • GPU: XFX R9 290X (crossfire secondary)
  • GPU: AMD R9 290X (crossfire primary)
  • SSD: Plextor 256Gb pci-e (M.2 key)
  • HDD 1: Seagate 1TB SSHD
  • HDD 2: Seagate 1TB SSHD
  • PSU: Corsair Ax860

 

Cooling:

  • GPU blocks are aquacomputer Hawaii full cover with an active backplate, nickel-plated
  • CPU block is an XPSC Raystorm
  • Top radiator is an XPSC EX280
  • Front radiator is a Darkside EX360
  • Pump is an MCP355
  • All tubing is 3/8 5/8 EK ZMT neoprene
  • All fittings are monsoon 3/8 5/8 compression black chrome
  • Antibacterial is a pure silver plated plug

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For Radeon-related news, announcements, events and giveaways, follow us on our social media – Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

Today, a new member of the Radeon™ RX 500 Series family joins us: the Radeon™ RX 590, with higher clock speed1 in enhanced 12nm technology.

 

 

1080p Gaming and Beyond

 

Joining the Radeon™ RX 500 Series stack of graphics cards, the Radeon™ RX 590 comes with a refresh in performance for today’s games. It brings up to a 27% boost in performance over the Radeon™ RX 4802, our previous generation “Polaris” architecture-based graphics card:

 

 

Radeon RX 590Radeon RX 480
Call of Duty: Black Ops 4125102
Civilization 68976
Destiny 29275
F1 20188368
Forza Horizon 49080
Kingdom Come Deliverance6248
Rainbow Six Siege193158
Strange Brigade9276

 

 

From these handful of games, we see a sizeable jump in performance when comparing the Radeon™ RX 590 to the Radeon™ RX 480—Call of Duty®: Black Ops 4 sees a 22% jump in performance, Kingdom Come Deliverance sees 27%, Rainbow Six Siege sees 22%, etc.

 

It’s a viable upgrade for anyone with a 2+ years old GPU.

 

The Radeon™ RX 590 is Radeon VR Ready Premium and FreeSync™ technology-capable. If you own a FreeSync technology-capable monitor, our stutter-free technology will work with the GPU to keep those frames smooth. If you don’t own one yet—what are you waiting for?

 

Looking at the upgrade with our exceptional Radeon™ Software Adrenalin Edition updates and our Radeon™ FreeSync technology, our ecosystem’s got you covered for 1080p gaming and beyond.

 

Get Three Kickass Games with the Radeon™ RX 590 GPU

 

If you want to pepper in an even sweeter deal with the release of the Radeon™ RX 590, you can grab it in a bundle that includes three kickass games—Ubisoft’s The Division® 2 and Capcom’s Resident Evil 2 and Devil May Cry 5. Our Raise the Game Fully Loaded bundle is now available.

 

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These are three of the hottest games coming next year, and buying a Radeon™ RX 590 graphics card3 gets you a key to these games that’ll unlock on their respective release dates:

 

  • Resident Evil™ 2 – January 25, 2019
  • Devil May Cry™ 5 – March 8, 2019
  • Tom Clancy’s The Division® 2 – March 15, 2019

 

Pick up the bundle at a participating retailer - check here for more details.

 

Share Your Radeon™ RX 590 Shots

 

We want to see your awesome gaming highlights on the Radeon™ RX 590! Tag us in your clips of fantastic, hilarious or any moments you want to show off using Radeon ReLive—we’ll share the best ones on @Radeon.

 

Happy gaming.

 

--

 

1. Based on AMD internal analysis in October 2018, comparing the clock speed of the Radeon™ RX 590 (1469 MHz Base/1545 MHz Boost) to the Radeon™ RX 580 (1257MHz Base/1340MHz Boost).

 

2. Testing done by AMD performance labs November 6, 2018 using an Intel i7 7700K 4.2GHz, 16GB DDR4-3000, Radeon Driver 18.11.1, Windows 10. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Using Call of Duty: Black Ops 4, Very High settings at 1080p, Radeon RX 590 scored 125.4 fps and Radeon RX 480 scored 102.7 fps. Using Civilization VI, Ultra settings at 1080p, Radeon RX 590 scored 89 fps and Radeon RX 480 scored 76.4 fps. Using FI 2018, Ultra High settings at 1080p, Radeon RX 590 scored 83 fps and Radeon RX 480 scored 68 fps. Using Forza Horizon 4, Ultra settings at 1080p, Radeon RX 590 scored 90.2 fps and Radeon RX 480 scored 80.8 fps. Using Kingdom Come Deliverance, Ultra High settings at 1080p, Radeon RX 590 scored 62 fps and Radeon RX 480 scored 48.7 fps. Using Strange Brigade, Ultra settings at 1080p, Radeon RX 590 scored 92.3 fps and Radeon RX 480 scored 76.1 fps. Using Destiny 2, Highest settings at 1080p, Radeon RX 590 scored 92.6 fps and Radeon RX 480 scored 75.4 fps. Using Rainbow Six Siege, Ultra settings at 1080p, Radeon RX 590 scored 193.6 fps and Radeon RX 480 scored 158.4 fps. RX-258

 

3. Offer available through participating retailers only. 18+ only. Following purchase, Coupon Code must be redeemed by April 6, 2019, after which coupon is void. Residency and additional limitations apply. For full Terms & Conditions, visit www.amdrewards.com.

 

--

 

Annie Lee is Sr. Game Marketing Specialist at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 11/07/17.]

 

This month, we’re highlighting a PC featuring the Radeon™ Vega Frontier Edition graphics card. We found Richard Parker’s post on /r/amd and reached out to highlight this impeccably built PC. Take a look at the photos below and hear about what inspired his snowy, sophisticated build:

 

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What inspired you to start building PCs? Do you remember the first PC you built?

 

I can comfortably say AMD inspired me to start building my own PCs, because it was just in March of this year when the Ryzen platform was released that I built my first system for personal use from the ground-up.

 

That particular machine is a very “budget home VM lab”, powered by a mildly overclocked R7 1700 and the performance has completely blown me away. I’ve been using computers since Windows 3.1 and only now did I feel like parts were cheap and powerful enough to allow me to comfortably attack projects like this on my own.

 

What’s the story behind this particular build?

 

This build let me fulfill a dream I’ve had my entire adult life dating back to when I got a taste of 3d Studio Max, AutoCAD, and Rhino in high school years ago: to own a 3D design, animation, and rendering machine that could produce results that live up to the original vision.

 

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I’ve never been able to afford a comparable system for personal use (dual Xeons, pro GPUs, etc.) and the Vega FE’s capabilities and price easily justified the decision to include it in the build alongside the Threadripper 1950x.

 

I knew I was going to tax both the CPU and GPU significantly, so I decided water cooling was a must. The price of most workstation-class GPUs and the lack of available water blocks for them made the Vega FE a no-brainer in this regard (I go into more detail on my YouTube channel and the build page on PCPartPicker for anyone who is interested).

 

Any difficult parts you were stuck on during the process?

 

I did an incredible amount of (nocturnal) research ahead of time and even went so far as to completely design the computer in 3D before anything was purchased to make sure the physical design would work at the most basic level. Specifically, the massive 480mm radiator is not listed as being officially supported by the case manufacturer.

 

I saw one (bad cell phone) picture on a lonely forum post on overclock.net of someone attempting a similar config and succeeding only in a very questionable capacity. That single image was enough for me to commit to the design and project.

 

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The water loop’s reservoir mounts and spacing required custom-length screws, which was new territory for me and thankfully turned out to be a fun little project in the garage with a hacksaw after a trip to the local hardware store.

 

I also lacked the detailed specs I needed from the case manufacturer ahead of time. The GPU tray needed to be modified on the fly (more surgical use of a hacksaw) to move the GPU as far forward/away from the CPU as possible, to comfortably allow the related tubing run between those two components.

 

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I went ahead and edited down, and posted my entire build with commentary on my YouTube channel in a single playlist showing the issues I ran into along the way. This included the CPU water block nearly ending the project long before flipping the power switch on for the first time. Disassembling, painting, and reassembling the Vardar fans was a very sincere “effort,” as well.

 

What help or resources did you use?

 

I completely devoured several YouTube channels with water-cooling content over the course of a short few weeks, while designing the build in 3D (Rhino).

 

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I also leaned heavily on Reddit’s water-cooling community, which was both unbelievably patient and enormously generous with their time and knowledge. PCPartPicker was also an invaluable resource.

 

The excitement surrounding the idea of building the computer I’d always wanted kept me very, very motivated. Sitting here at my desk now, enjoying the final product, and reflecting on the entire build effort—it’s still really hard for me to put into words what this computer means to me.

 

Why did you go with Radeon?

 

I haven’t taken gaming seriously in recent years because the related components have, in my opinion, been inflated on the price side. I’ve been perfectly happy to wait for the games’ prices to drop significantly before playing them on last year’s hardware. Before this project, I simply hadn’t ever bought a new desktop computer.

 

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I did, however, get a 5770 in a second-hand machine a few years ago and it ran the original Skyrim like a dream. That same GPU is now singing very happily in the VM lab build from earlier this year, alongside the R7 1700. My experience gaming with that GPU, along with the reasons I already mentioned, supported the decision to go with Radeon for this computer. I expect the Vega Frontier Edition to be able to hold its own for several years to come.

 

What games got you into PC gaming?

 

The King’s Quest series and Wing Commander. Past that, games that come to mind are the original Command & Conquer games, the original Warcraft series, and I had thousands of hours with my friends on the original Half-Life multiplayer and the early versions of Counter Strike before Steam ever existed.

 

What games are you currently playing? Which upcoming ones are you most excited for?

 

Recently, I’ve been enjoying the absolute chaos available in PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds with friends. But I have to play that game in moderation, because playing in 4K is both new and different to me. Ghost Recon Wildlands is generally just a beautiful experience. I am really excited to play back through many games from my past like, the Far Cry series, Skyrim with new textures, Dying Light, several Wolfenstein titles, and so many others. For upcoming games, the sky is the limit. I’m really excited about the new Wolfenstein release.

 

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I intend to spend a lot of time in games that I can create myself now, using various design platforms and dumping everything into my own environments in Unreal Engine.

 

I describe these projects/current ideas to others right now as a vacation that won’t require a plane ticket. My introduction to VR will likely be a part of those projects in the coming months. I’m especially looking forward to recreating some favorite locations from my childhood and building my own virtual movie theater, possibly situated very high up in a very large tree and with very large dinosaurs walking around on the ground below me :]

 

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What do you think of Richard’s build? To find out more about the PC, you can follow him on Twitter, YouTube or check out his PCPartPicker build page here.

 

We’re also looking for more builds to highlight, so tag us on social media with your photos and you might be our next Featured Radeon Rig:

RADEON ON TWITTER

RADEON ON FACEBOOK

RADEON ON INSTAGRAM

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 07/30/17.]

 

Written by Annie Lee and Jason Evangelho

 

Radeon is back in the high-end gaming space with Radeon RX Vega, and we can’t wait to dig in and start playing!

 

At Radeon Technologies Group we’re invested in making the overall gaming experience better, because we live and breathe gaming too! We’re obsessed with our rigs. We share tips and tweaks. We count down the minutes until our most anticipated titles are released. Like you, we’re constantly striving to extract the best performance from our systems, and proudly show off our unique rigs to the world.

 

For enthusiasts, the hardware we use to game can be an equally important aspect of our gamer identity. Now new hardware is within reach.

 

What Radeon RX Vega Means for You

 

Gamers are passionate about the industry and know exactly what they want: mind-blowing visuals, maximum framerates, and high resolutions. As enthusiasts, we’re always trying to push our settings and systems to the limit. Those limits, of course, are usually enforced by your hardware.

 

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Battlefield 1 screenshot officially released by EA/DICE

 

The arrival of our next-gen enthusiast graphics cards means we can go a little bit farther than before, with the “Vega” architecture opening new doors for game developers to push the limits of their imaginations.

 

At the heart of Radeon RX Vega GPUs is the revolutionary High-Bandwidth Cache Controller. This new feature allows for larger memory capacities, making Radeon RX Vega GPUs smart, fast and designed to break through traditional GPU memory limitations.

 

 

And together with its next-generation geometry path and enhanced pixel engine, the focus is on speed and precision in demanding games, capable of effortlessly carrying you into high-performance bliss.

 

With game engines shifting to the latest generation APIs, DirectX® 12 and Vulkan®, Radeon RX Vega graphics are poised to deliver outstanding performance for future-ready gaming.

 

Take a closer look at the complete list of Radeon RX Vega’s new technologies.

 

The Essential Trichotomy of Gaming

 

Even though Radeon RX Vega brings thrilling possibilities to how far we can push our visuals, there are several other factors shaping the ultimate gaming experience. Radeon has a solution for all of them.

 

It’s simple: hardware + software + displays = the essential trichotomy of gaming.

 

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A powerful graphics card can do incredible things on its own, but add to it an ecosystem of equally powerful partners and you have a technologically harmonic, incredible gaming machine.

 

With the power of Radeon FreeSync Technology and advanced Radeon Software, the possibilities with Vega graphics are endless:

  • Bask in the brilliance of high fidelity gaming at ultrawide, 1440p and 4K with Radeon™ FreeSync displays. You’ll minimize tearing, latency, and stutter.1
  • Witness supercharged performance with leading-edge Radeon Software features like Radeon Chill enabling quiet, responsive gaming.
  • Experience premium VR immersion with cinematic capabilities, powered by AMD LiquidVR™ technology2

 

 

Our FreeSync technology is continuing to reward gamers with stutter-free, fluid gameplay without its competitor’s steeper prices. Radeon FreeSync 23 delivers smooth gameplay with stunning HDR pixel quality, and keeps gameplay at low latency without sacrificing framerates. Beginning with Samsung CHG70 and the ultrawide, curved CHG90, gamers will have greater options than ever to achieve a visually incredible experience.

 

Radeon Software 17.7.2’s release last week was our biggest this year and unleashed more features than ever. Ongoing driver support is one of our top priorities, ensuring gamers will have the most up-to-date tools for Radeon RX Vega—consistently.

 

 

The Radeon Ecosystem: Making the Games Shine

 

With Radeon RX Vega, our foray into today’s most graphically-intense games is one of discovery—what we see, how fast we can go, and ultimately how we play. That’s what this all comes down to: the games themselves.

 

With highly anticipated titles like Bethesda’s Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus4 and Ubisoft’s Far Cry 55 around the corner, Radeon RX Vega’s synergy with FreeSync and Radeon Software is more exciting than ever.

 

 

 

Equip your rig with a Radeon RX Vega graphics card and you’re more than prepared. Journey into your favorite worlds with striking detail, whether you’re exploring Talos I in Prey6, collecting conquests in Civilization VI7 or preparing to save Hope County (with a canine companion, maybe) in Far Cry 5

 

The experience is yours to take. Defy convention. Choose the future. Choose Radeon RX Vega.

 

For more on Radeon RX Vega, make sure you’re following our social channels:

Twitter: @Radeon

Facebook: @Radeon

Instagram: @WeAreRadeon

 

 

Cautionary Statement

This blog contains forward-looking statements concerning Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. (AMD) including, but not limited to, the timing, features, functionality, availability, expectations, performance, and benefits of AMD’s Radeon RX Vega graphics products, which are made pursuant to the Safe Harbor provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are commonly identified by words such as “would,” “may,” “expects,” “believes,” “plans,” “intends,” “projects” and other terms with similar meaning. Investors are cautioned that the forward-looking statements in this blog are based on current beliefs, assumptions and expectations, speak only as of the date of this blog and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from current expectations. Such statements are subject to certain known and unknown risks and uncertainties, many of which are difficult to predict and generally beyond AMD’s control, that could cause actual results and other future events to differ materially from those expressed in, or implied or projected by, the forward-looking information and statements. Investors are urged to review in detail the risks and uncertainties in AMD’s Securities and Exchange Commission filings, including but not limited to AMD’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended April 1, 2017.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Compatible with Radeon™ consumer graphics products in supported DirectX®9, DirectX®11, DirectX®12 and Vulcan games for Windows®7/10. For more details and whitelist of supported games, see www.radeon.com/chill. GD-121
  2. AMD LiquidVR available on Radeon VR Ready Premium Products, which are select Radeon GPUs that meet or exceed the Oculus Rift or HTC Vive recommended specifications for video cards/GPUs. Other hardware (including CPU) and system requirements recommended by Oculus Rift or HTC Vive should also be met in order to operate the applicable HMDs as intended. As VR technology, HMDs and other VR hardware and software evolve and/or become available, these criteria may change without notice. PC/System manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different VR results/performance. Check with your PC or system manufacturer to confirm VR capabilities. GD-102
  3. FreeSync 2 does not require HDR capable monitors; driver can set monitor in native mode when FreeSync 2 supported HDR content is detected. Otherwise, HDR content requires that the system be configured with a fully HDR-ready content chain, including: graphics card, graphics driver and application. Video content must be graded in HDR and viewed with an HDR-ready player. Windowed mode content requires operating system support. GD-105
  4. Wolfenstein® images and logos © 2017 Bethesda Softworks® LLC, a ZeniMax® Media company. Developed in association with MachineGames®. Wolfenstein and related logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of id Software LLC in the U.S. and/or other countries. MachineGames, Bethesda, Bethesda Softworks, ZeniMax and related logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of ZeniMax Media Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries. All Rights Reserved.
  5. Far Cry® images and logos © 2017 Ubisoft Entertainment. All Rights Reserved. Far Cry, Ubisoft and the Ubisoft logo are trademarks of Ubisoft Entertainment in the US and/or other countries. Based on Crytek’s original Far Cry directed by Cevat Yerli. Powered by Crytek’s technology “CryEngine”.
  6. Prey® images and logos © 2017 Bethesda Softworks® LLC, a ZeniMax® Media company. Developed in association with Arkane® Studios. Prey, Arkane, Bethesda, Bethesda Softworks, ZeniMax and related logos are registered trademarks or trademarks of ZeniMax Media Inc. in the U.S. and/or other countries. All rights reserved. All other trade- marks or trade names are the property of their respective owners. All Rights Reserved.
  7. Sid Meier’s Civilization® images and logos ©2017 Take-Two Interactive Software and its subsidiaries. Sid Meier’s Civilization, Civilization, Civ, 2K, Firaxis Games, Take-Two Interactive Software and their respective logos are all trademarks of Take-Two Interactive Software, Inc. All other marks and trademarks are the property of their respective owners. All rights reserved.

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[Originally posted on 08/30/17.]

 

We were at QuakeCon last week and something caught our eye walking through the BYOC area: a wooden box, carved meticulously to let an orange glow seep into the dark convention center. A few people were standing around it and admiring the rig.

 

The PC belonged to John Lahtinen, a Red Team member. We asked him some questions about the build—check out the PC in more detail below and admire the stunning craftsmanship!

 

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Specs:

  • CPU: Ryzen™ 5 1500X
  • GPU: XFX Radeon™ RX 570
  • Motherboard: ASRock AB350 Gaming-ITX/AC
  • RAM: 16 GB GeIL EVO X RGB DDR4
  • Storage: 480 GB Radeon R7 SSD
  • Power supply: Corsair SF600
  • Fans: APEVIA CF12SL-SOG 120mm Orange (x3)

 

What inspired you to create this build?

 

When Ryzen 7 launched back in March, AMD Red Team Plus members received a sample kit packaged inside a wood box with the Ryzen logo etched on the door. The dimensions, hardware, and logo were almost begging to be converted into an ITX build. Once the AM4 ITX motherboards arrived at retailers, I knew what I wanted to take with me to Quakecon.

 

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What was the most difficult part of the process?

 

Motherboard and GPU mounting were a challenge. Motherboard mounting hole dimensions are just too precise for me to be comfortable with attaching them directly to relatively soft wood. After some determined Google searching, I managed to find what seemed to be a rather ideal solution on the SFF Network forums (https://smallformfactor.net/). An enterprising fellow out of Finland had fabricated a brilliant little modular aluminum ITX frame. I’ll be reviewing this frame (called the NATi Tray) soon, and will be using it again with future wood builds.

 

Unfortunately, it wasn’t smooth-sailing from there. The thickness of the wood in the rear of the case obstructed video cable connection, so out came the dremel! Which was a bit painful when you think you’re so close to completion. And then you discover it isn’t just the wood causing the obstruction, but the thickness of the metal GPU bracket frame as well. Out came the GPU frame.

 

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Where did you get help or what resources did you use?

 

The local Techshop was a fantastic resource for this project. I didn’t have access to or experience with a laser cutter, so I enlisted help from one of the many craftsmen there. I found some truly remarkable projects in the works over there that have spawned ideas for future builds.

 

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Do you remember your first rig? What made you want to put it together?

 

The first rig I built? That was a loooong time ago. It used an AMD K6-2 400 MHz and lasted me many years until I upgraded and passed it along to my sister. It was part desire to have a deeper understanding of the computer and part pragmatism (not wanting to pay someone to fix/upgrade it) that prompted me to go the DIY route. I’ve done DIY builds ever since.

 

What games are you playing on the rig right now? What games/franchises got you into PC gaming?

 

I’m a big FPS guy. The original Doom was the catalyst for my interest in PC gaming. Naturally my gaming last weekend at Quakecon was dominated by id Software games: Quake Champions, Doom, and even some good old Quake II. My obsessions have varied over time- Starcraft, Skyrim, Battlefield 4, and Fallout 4. But these days I typically play a lot of Overwatch and PUBG.

 

Why Radeon?

 

I’ve used so many Radeon GPUs over the years: HD 5770, HD 6950, R9 270X, R9 290, RX 480, and RX 570 – all of them have been outstanding. Supporting inclusive technologies like OpenCL, FreeSync, and Vulkan is important to me. They all equate to better experiences – playing Vulkan Doom on a Freesync monitor all last weekend is absolute proof of that. And of course top-notch Crimson Software with ReLive, which I use frequently for game recording/streaming.

 

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What upcoming PC games are you most excited for?

 

I’m really looking forward to a few that were showcased during this year’s E3: Wolfenstein II, Beyond Good and Evil 2 (for its impressive engine with real-time scaling of multiple galaxies), and Sea of Thieves (how can shooting yourself out of a cannon not be fun?).

 

__________

 

Got a Radeon-powered rig you’re proud of? Want to show off your modding skills? Tag us on social media to bring your rig to the spotlight!

 

Interested in joining the Red Team? Find out more about the Red Team community!

 

FOLLOW RADEON

LIKE RADEON ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 09/01/17.]

 

They’re Radeon™ fans, they’re hardcore gamers and they’re enthusiast builders—and they’re the few lucky gamers who won a Radeon RX Vega and had one in their hands before anyone else.

 

From the massive Vega giveaway back in January and our RX Community Tour, four gamers opened their prize packages to see the glimmer of the silver-plated, liquid-cooled Radeon RX Vega 64.

 

We asked them how they felt about winning the Radeon RX Vega before the cards arrived at their doorstep, and they were eager to share their thoughts on the high-end graphics cards.

 

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“The possibilities are endless. Thanks to Vega I can play smoothly in 4K but that’s the obvious part. Then I can choose a 4K monitor much easier because of the FreeSync support. Another thing that I would never try without a proper card is VR but now I have a reason to do that. There are just so many things I could write about and more after I try it with my new build.” –Yan Buyko, Hungary

 

 

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“The most exciting thing about receiving a Radeon RX Vega card is being able to be a part of the technology wave that AMD has unleashed over the past few months. The disruption AMD is bringing to the video and computing arena brings much needed competition in both technology and pricing, it’s a great time to be an AMD fan.” –Breck Anderson, USA

 

 

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“I am extremely excited about not only FINALLY building a computer of my own, but also building one with incredible VR capabilities! We will have a fantastic GPU that will be viable for many years to come and I will never have to borrow a computer again for PDX LAN!” –Ashley Bocaniciu, USA

 

 

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“This is an amazing gift. I’m excited to new Radeon RX Vega graphics technology and performance. I can’t wait to unpack it. :)” –Mateusz Pokrywka, Poland

 

We love seeing gamers so thrilled. If you want to show off your rig, be sure to follow us on our social channels and tag us—we want to see your build!

 

FOLLOW RADEON

LIKE RADEON ON FACEBOOK

FOLLOW ON INSTAGRAM

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 11/02/17.]

 

A few weeks ago, we sent out this tweet:

 

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Then, proud GPU owners’ photos came flooding in—and we went on a nostalgia trip with these “retro GPUs”. Some of them are only a few years old, but it’s still nice to look back at the cards that once seemed mint and brand-new.

 

Take a look the photos the owners sent of the cards they kept around.

 

@matteopey:

 

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Jarrod (@JarrodsTech)’s MSI R5870:

 

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Stefan (@Misel)’s Rage 128:

 

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Camilo (@MrFusterCluck)’s Sapphire HD 3850:

 

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@Beccdoor‘s HD 3870:

 

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Josh (@joshdalemon)’s HD 4850 Toxic:

 

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Richard (@schlegelrichard)’s MSI X850 XT:

 

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Harry (@cuttsharry123)’s HD 7990 and 9200:

 

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Emilio (@Emilio_ARG)’s HD 5770:

 

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Dave (@Leviathanprim3)’s Radeon 9550:

 

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Øyvind (@Mastromical)’s collection:

 

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Alexander (@grafptitsyn)’s Sapphire HD 4870:

 

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Clint (@Icebug)’s Mach 32:

 

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Stephen O’Brien (@TPJerematic)’s Sapphire HD 2600 Pro:

 

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*All photographs are property of the tagged owner and have been shared with us for this blog.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.