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It’s incredible to see how far the gaming industry has come in the past two decades. At Alienware, I helped introduce some of the world’s first gaming laptops and we kicked off what would become a new era of portable gaming. Looking at those notebooks now, which were revolutionary, but also thick, heavy, hot and loud, I could not have dreamed of the beautiful and practical gaming laptops we see today.

 

As I looked to the next generation of gaming products, I saw AMD as the only company where I could come make my vision for those products a reality. How you might ask? AMD has what I like to call the “AMD advantage” – it’s the only processor company that has the combination of high-performance CPUs with AMD RyzenTM and graphics with AMD RadeonTM, plus the extensive suite of AMD Technology and Software.

 

On stage at CES 2020, I introduced the first “AMD Advantage” system to the world: the Dell G5 15 SE. Today, this collaboration between Dell and AMD comes to life. We are proud to share the most comprehensive all-AMD gaming solution ever, combining those core components of AMD RyzenTM processors, AMD RadeonTM graphics, and AMD technologies and software. Starting at under $1,000 USD, the new Dell G5 15 SE laptop can do it all – play the latest games at high framerates and excel at content creation and productivity in the office or classroom.

 

 

On the outside, it’s finished in a contemporary iridescent silver shell. On the inside, this system brings unparalleled performance to its class alongside gamer-centric features including AMD FreeSyncTM[1] and the AMD Radeon Adrenalin Software suite and introduces new innovations such as AMD SmartShift.

 

And what is SmartShift? Think of it as a free performance boost. We’re not increasing the size, the weight, or the power draw of the laptop, but we’re giving gamers up to 14 percent more performance averaged across select games[2] by enabling the processor and graphics to communicate directly with one another. This is made possible by dynamically shifting power from the Ryzen Processor to the Radeon Graphics and vice versa based on demand. The best part is that it does it seamlessly, quickly, and automatically without user input or any application-specific support required. As WIRED Magazine put it in its “Best of CES 2020” list: “It's smart, it's powerful, and it has big potential.”

 

 

In addition to this new SmartShift technology, you will also find an optional four-zone RGB keyboard, customizable to your style. Choose between two display options at launch: a 60Hz or a 144Hz AMD FreeSync technology-enabled panel, with an additional 120Hz AMD FreeSync variant expected in August 2020 for smooth, tear- and stutter-free gaming.

 

Digging deeper, the Dell G5 15 SE features a full-fledged AMD Ryzen H-Series processor. With Ryzen H-series, you’ll unleash desktop-caliber performance in your laptop for high performance gaming, content creation and multitasking. From the 6-core Ryzen 5 4600H with a up to 4.0 GHz boost clock[3], all the way up to the 8-core Ryzen 9 4900H capable of up to 4.4 GHz max boost[3]. No matter which processor you choose, it is paired with fast dual-channel 3200 MHz memory, so nothing holds you back.

 

Debuting in this laptop is also the AMD RadeonTM RX 5600M, built on the efficient 7nm AMD RDNA gaming architecture with 6GB of memory and 36 compute units for high-power graphics on the go. Perfect for the ultimate 60+ FPS 1080p gaming experience, the Radeon graphics are only enhanced further with SmartShift.

 

 

With this system, we have combined the latest AMD processor, graphics, software to build the best experience we’ve seen in laptops. For us, this is just the beginning – the Dell G5 15 SE is the start of a new era and is sure to be a game changer.

 

 

Frank Azor is the Chief Architect of Gaming Solutions at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.  GD-5

 

[1] AMD FreeSyncTM technology requires AMD RadeonTM graphics and a display that supports FreeSync technology as certified by AMD. AMD FreeSyncTM Premium technology adds requirements of mandatory low framerate compensation and at least 120 Hz refresh rate at minimum FHD. AMD FreeSyncTM Premium Pro technology adds requirements for the display to meet AMD FreeSync Premium Pro compliance tests. See www.amd.com/freesync for complete details. Confirm capability with your system manufacturer before purchase. GD-127

[2] RM-018 Testing done by AMD performance labs May 04 2020 on Dell 15 G5 SE, Ryzen 7 4800H with RX 5600M 6GB, 32GB DDR4-3200Mhz, AMD Driver 20.10.02-200401a-354027E, with SmartShift ON vs. the same laptop with SmartShift OFF. Uplift based on an average of performance in The Witcher 3, Battlefield 5 and The Division 2. Performance may vary. RM-018.

[3] Max boost for AMD Ryzen processors is the maximum frequency achievable by a single core on the processor running a bursty single-threaded workload. Max boost will vary based on several factors, including, but not limited to: thermal paste; system cooling; motherboard design and BIOS; the latest AMD chipset driver; and the latest OS updates. GD-150

This week has been a big one for GPUOpen. After four years of being the vehicle for AMD’s commitment to openness and support for open standards, we realized it was time for a fresh coat of digital paint. So on Monday, we relaunched GPUOpen.com with a brand-new website, now making it easier than ever to explore the home for all our game development and content creation software tools and technologies.

 

As part of the relaunch, we also kicked off a week of new software releases for developers. This started with the very well-received expansion of our open-source AMD FidelityFX shader-based effects with a further four new effects, making it a very powerful image quality developer toolkit.

 

Since then, there have been even more exciting releases for developers which you can learn more about below.

 


Unreal Engine Performance Guide, and Optimization and Feature Patches

We want to make it as easy as possible for developers to take full advantage of Unreal Engine 4 when running on AMD graphics hardware. We have a dedicated team of engineers who work closely with Epic Games on Unreal Engine and their recommendations for getting the best performance from Unreal Engine are detailed in our Performance Guide.

 

We’ve also released a series of downloadable AMD performance and feature patches too, which are available to developers who have access to the Unreal Engine GitHub repository.

 

 

There are ten different performance-focused patches that you can integrate easily into your Unreal Engine codebase. These patches are designed to be applied to specific versions of the Unreal Engine and target specific performance optimizations in the engine. Also available are patches and plug-ins that can add additional features to Unreal Engine, including Chroma Keying, AMD FidelityFX Contrast Adaptive Sharpening (CAS), TressFX for AMD optimized hair and fur rendering, and FEMFX, our deformable material physics library.

 

Learn More About AMD’s Unreal Engine Optimizations

 

 

Content Creation Updates, Including AMD Radeon ProRender

On Wednesday, our focus was on updates for content creation and professional application tools and technologies, including AMD Radeon ProRender, and you can read all about our updates to our Radeon ProRender Developer Suite in this detailed blog.

 

 

Along with the updates to Radeon ProRender, we also released an update to Compressonator, our set of tools that allow artists and developers to easily create compressed texture assets or model mesh optimizations. The 4.0 update adds support for GPU-based encoding with OpenCL and DirectX 11, amongst other things.

 

Learn More About AMD Radeon ProRender

Learn More About the AMD Radeon ProRender Developer Suite
Learn More About Compressonator 4.0

 

 

New Radeon Memory Visualizer and RDNA Performance Guide

Joining our family of advanced tools that help developers optimize their games is our new Radeon Memory Visualizer (RMV) that lets you show your video memory some love.

 

 

Radeon Memory Visualizer is a ground-breaking new tool to allow you to gain a deep understanding of how your DirectX 12 or Vulkan application or game uses memory for graphics resources. RMV lets you profile memory allocations, find memory leaks, and understand resource paging.

 

 

AMD’s new RDNA architecture is designed for the next generation of efficient high-performance gaming and powers Radeon RX 5000 series graphics cards. Our RDNA architecture is optimized for efficiency and programmability. To help game developers get the most out of our new architecture, we have created a DirectX 12 and Vulkan performance guide that can be used to optimize games for RDNA. It is the page all developers targeting RDNA should bookmark.

 

Learn More About Radeon Memory Visualizer

Learn More About the RDNA Performance Guide

 

 


Let’s Build… 2020, Our Developer Event You Can Attend from Home

As a reminder, to close off our GPUOpen relaunch week, we are bringing everything together into our first-ever developer event you can attend virtually today.

 

Here are the video presentations you can watch starting RIGHT NOW:

  • AMD Ryzen Processor Software Optimization: An introduction to the AMD Ryzen family of processors followed by advanced optimization topics.
  • Optimizing for the Radeon RDNA Architecture: Join this session to learn about the details of RDNA and how it differs from GCN architecture.
  • From Source to ISA: A Trip Down the Shader Compiler Pipeline: Uncover the secrets of the shader compiler on a journey from the source code to the RDNA ISA.
  • A Review of GPUOpen Effects: This presentation will provide an overview of existing and new graphics effects available on GPUOpen, including FidelityFX.
  • Curing Amnesia and Other GPU Maladies with AMD Developer Tools: Meet the newest tool in AMD's Radeon tool suite - the Radeon Memory Visualizer.
  • Radeon ProRender Full Spectrum Rendering 2.0: The Universal Rendering API: An introduction to the upcoming Radeon ProRender 2.0, the universal rendering API.

Join our Let’s Build… 2020 virtual event 

 

 

 

Alexander Blake-Davies is a Software Product Marketing Specialist for Radeon Software for Developers at AMD’s Radeon Technology Group. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third-party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

2020 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, Radeon, and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. DirectX is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and/or other jurisdictions. OpenCL is a trademark of Apple Inc. used by permission by Khronos Group, Inc. Unreal and its logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Epic Games, Inc. in the US and elsewhere. Vulkan is a registered trademark of Khronos Group Inc. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

AMD’s commitment to openness is the foundation upon which the GPUOpen initiative was built. We stand behind the belief that the freedom of open standards and being open about our hardware drives innovation forward faster and further than any proprietary technology can.

 

Since 2016, GPUOpen has been a vehicle for this vision, sharing our game development and content creation software tools and technologies, with a focus on solving developer problems.

 



However, after four years, we realized that it was time to give the site a fresh coat of digital paint and we are pleased to announce that we have relaunched GPUOpen.com, building a brand-new website with a modern look and feel. You will find it straightforward to navigate the wealth of information available, including the latest news, detailed tutorials and samples, presentations, and guest blogs. Our tools and technologies are clearly presented to enable developers to easily access what they need to make their games even better.

 

“AMD has a rich tradition of supporting both open standards and open source. Today, I’m very excited to see our relaunched GPUOpen website, which marks AMD’s continued commitment to openness and the enablement of innovation. Whether its fantastic developer tools, vibrant graphical effects, or our easy-to-use SDKs; GPUOpen puts developers at the heart of everything we do.”
                                                               -- Andrej Zdravkovic, Senior Vice President of Software Development

 

This relaunch is our way of recommitting to the values GPUOpen stands for, and our new slogan, “Let’s build everything”, is to show that AMD is here to help you build great things with our technology.

 

To celebrate, in addition to the website relaunch we are releasing new GPUOpen tools and technologies every day this week, until Friday, when our “Let’s Build…” virtual developer event takes place, where our talented engineers will be sharing their knowledge with you in a series of six recorded video presentations.

 

Read on to see what we are releasing today and check back on the GPUOpen website each day at 4 PM BST/11 AM EDT this week to see more exciting releases.

 

 

Achieve Maximum Fidelity with New AMD FidelityFX Effects

In 2019 we released our first AMD FidelityFX feature, Contrast Adaptive Sharpening (CAS). This effect is now used in over 15 games to enable better visual sharpness with minimal artifacts, restoring detail lost after Temporal Anti-Aliasing (TAA) is applied. Now we are expanding FidelityFX into an open-source image quality developer toolkit with four additional shader-based features aimed at improving rendering quality and performance.

 


Click to enlarge image


The four new open-source FidelityFX features available today are:

  • FidelityFX Screen Space Reflections: Our implementation of Stochastic Screen Space Reflections (SSSR) delivers high-quality reflections with minimal overhead, via an optimized compute shader and RDNA architecture-optimized denoising.
  • FidelityFX Ambient Occlusion: Our RDNA architecture-optimized Combined Adaptive Compute Ambient Occlusion (CACAO) effect dynamically and efficiently helps improve the appearance of objects based their exposure to ambient light.
  • FidelityFX HDR Mapper: Optimized for use with AMD FreeSync Premium Pro1 displays, AMD’s Luminance Preserving Mapper (LPM) delivers superior HDR and wide color gamut content for games.
  • FidelityFX Downsampler: Single-pass and optimized for RDNA architecture, AMD’s compute shader-based Single Pass Downsampler (SPD) generates texture MIP levels using asynchronous compute for optimal performance.


With AMD FidelityFX, game developers can deliver high-quality visuals with minimal performance overhead, freeing up graphics cards to power the intense gaming experiences gamers demand.

 

Learn More About AMD FidelityFX

Learn More About AMD FidelityFX on GPUOpen



Next Level Physics and Hair Effects Demos

FEMFX is our open-source CPU library for deformable material physics, using the Finite Element Method (FEM) and is available as source code and as a plug-in for Unreal Engine.

 


Highly optimized to take advantage of the processing power today’s modern multithreaded CPUs like AMD Ryzen series processors, FEMFX enables developers to add a whole new level of physics realism to their games.

 

TressFX is our GPU-accelerated realistic hair and fur rendering and simulation technology and the new version 4.1 offers improved performance and new features, including Unreal Engine integration.

 


Click to enlarge image

To make it easier for developers to see FEMFX and TressFX in action, and for gamers to be able to check out some of the advanced effects they can expect to see in future game releases, we’ve put together some standalone demos that can be downloaded today.

 

For FEMFX, we have two demos – the “FEMFX Demo” is an interactive experience that shows off different FEM physics effects and the “Alien Pods” demo is an example of the gameplay puzzle mechanics that FEMFX could enable.

For TressFX, the “Old King” demo is a non-interactive real-time example of the kind of high-quality extremely realistic hair and fur effects our technology enables.

 

*This demo does not have audio


Learn More about FEMFX on GPUOpen

Learn More about TressFX on GPUOpen

 

 

 


“Let’s Build…”, Our Developer Event You Can Attend from Home

To finish up the GPUOpen relaunch week, we are bringing everything together into our first-ever developer event you can attend virtually. The “Let’s build…” event includes many of the presentations we had planned for the now-postponed Game Developers Conference (GDC) 2020, giving everyone a chance to watch them.

 

Here is a preview of the video presentations you can watch starting 4 PM BST, 11 AM EDT this Friday:

  • AMD Ryzen Processor Software Optimization: An introduction to the AMD Ryzen family of processors followed by advanced optimization topics.
  • Optimizing for the Radeon RDNA Architecture: Join this session to learn about the details of RDNA and how it differs from GCN architecture.
  • From Source to ISA: A Trip Down the Shader Compiler Pipeline: Uncover the secrets of the shader compiler on a journey from the source code to the RDNA ISA.
  • A Review of GPUOpen Effects: This presentation will provide an overview of existing and new graphics effects available on GPUOpen, including FidelityFX.
  • Curing Amnesia and Other GPU Maladies with AMD Developer Tools: Meet the newest tool in AMD's Radeon tool suite - the Radeon Memory Visualizer.
  • Radeon ProRender Full Spectrum Rendering 2.0: The Universal Rendering API: An introduction to the upcoming Radeon ProRender 2.0, the universal rendering API.


Learn More About the “Let’s Build…” Event




Alexander Blake-Davies
is a Software Product Marketing Specialist for Radeon Software for Developers at AMD’s Radeon Technology Group. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third-party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

  1. AMD FreeSync technology requires AMD Radeon graphics and a display that supports FreeSync technology as certified by AMD. AMD FreeSync Premium technology adds requirements of mandatory low framerate compensation and at least 120 Hz refresh rate at minimum FHD. AMD FreeSync Premium Pro technology adds requirements for the display to meet AMD FreeSync Premium Pro compliance tests. See www.amd.com/freesync for complete details. Confirm capability with your system manufacturer before purchase. GD-127

2020 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, Radeon, and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Unreal and its logo are trademarks or registered trademarks of Epic Games, Inc. in the US and elsewhere. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

In 2016, we made a pretty bold commitment to you: we would continue to support AMD Socket AM4 until 2020. It was a big promise, especially given what people were accustomed to with other platforms. In the four ensuing years, the humble Socket AM4 has been on an incredible trajectory:

 

  • 4X more cores and 8X more threads (4C4T → 16C32t)
  • 4X architectures (“Excavator” → “Zen” → “Zen+” → “Zen 2”)
  • 4X process technologies (28nm → 14nm → 12nm → 7nm)
  • 4X PCIe bandwidth (12x PCIe Gen 3 → 24x PCIe Gen 4)
  • +33% DRAM bandwidth (DDR4-2400 → DDR4-3200+)


Nobody has even come close to a compatibility effort like this in the history of x86 processors. Until the advent of Socket AM4, I think it’s fair to say that most PC builders expected every socket to be a dead end: use it for the processor it launched with, then get another one when a new CPU launches. But our technology is different.


And that difference is no accident: it was for you. It was by design. And we're still working on it. About 9 years ago, we set out to create one CPU socket that could help your PC grow with us. It has been an enormous engineering challenge to create a platform that can host so many different architectures and configurations along the way. But we were up to the challenge, and we are still investing in it, because we knew how unique and special it could be. We know it’s daunting to feel like you need to replace all of your core hardware just to get a CPU upgrade. It’s expensive. As enthusiasts ourselves, we totally get it.


Now that we’re in 2020, you’re undoubtedly wondering just how far that commitment goes. You have questions about what happens next. And we’re ready to share a little more detail, starting with The Big Question.

 

Q: Will the “Zen 3” architecture be compatible with AMD Socket AM4?
A: Yes! AMD officially plans to support next-gen AMD Ryzen desktop processors, with the “Zen 3” architecture, on AMD X570 and B550 motherboards. This will require a BIOS update. Specific details about this update will come at a later time, but we’re committed to keeping you up-to-date. We’ve also updated our official chipset/CPU support matrix to take future “Zen 3” processors into account (below)!

 


Q: What about (X pre-500 Series chipset)?
A: AMD has no plans to introduce “Zen 3” architecture support for older chipsets. While we wish could enable full support for every processor on every chipset, the flash memory chips that store BIOS settings and support have capacity limitations. Given these limitations, and the unprecedented longevity of the AM4 socket, there will inevitably be a time and place where a transition to free up space is necessary—the AMD 500 Series chipsets are that time.


Q: How long will Socket AM4 last from here?
A: This will depend on the schedule of industry I/O technologies. Such technology changes typically require adjustments to the pin count or layout of a processor package, which would necessitate a new socket. We have no specific details to share concerning this roadmap or timing right now, but we know it’s important to keep you updated—and we will.


Q: Wait, wait, I have more questions!
A: All shall be revealed in time! For now, we can all focus on what’s at hand: AMD B550 motherboards arrive soon, and we wanted you to rest easy knowing that an investment in this platform gives you a clear upgrade path tomorrow. The same is true for AMD X570 motherboards, too.


Historic upgradeability is what AMD Socket AM4 has been known for throughout its life, and that legacy continues—even now in 2020. So, if you’d like to know more about the AMD B550 chipset, please visit AMD.com. And if you’re interested in building a new gaming rig around AMD B550, motherboards will be available starting June 16th.

 

Stay tuned!

 

Robert Hallock is the Technical Marketing lead for AMD consumer processors. The information contained herein is for informational purposes only and is subject to change without notice. Timelines, roadmaps, and/or product release dates are plans only and subject to change. “Zen"; "Zen+"; “Zen 2”; and “Zen 3” are codenames for AMD architectures and are not product names. GD-122

adit.bhutani

Game Beyond 4GB

Posted by adit.bhutani May 6, 2020

PC Gaming continues to push the limitations of PC hardware every year in the quest for improved visuals and framerates. One of the ways to enjoy the latest titles on your PC is to ensure your graphics card has enough Graphics Memory (VRAM).

 

A few of the newer AAA games benefit greatly from having more VRAM available to store assets needed, play at higher resolutions, and to enable the latest visual effects.

 

For those looking at making sure they have enough Graphics memory for games that are pushing the limits of 4GB, AMD RadeonTM RX graphics cards provide a wide set of solutions in 6GB or 8GB capabilities that include: RadeonTM RX 570, RX 580, RX 590, and RX 5000 Series GPUs.

 

 

When gaming with insufficient levels of Graphics Memory, even at 1080p, gamers might expect several issues:

  1. Error Messages and Warning Limits
  2. Lower Framerates
  3. Gameplay Stutter and Texture Pop-in Issues

 

Recent releases have shown marked performance increases when switching from a RadeonTM 5500 XT 4GB to a RadeonTM 5500 XT 8GB.  In DOOM Eternal, the 8GB card runs the game at Ultra Nightmare settings at 75FPS (1080p), while the 4GB card can’t apply the graphics settings with that level of VRAM1. Looking at titles such as Borderlands 3, Call of Duty Modern Warfare, Forza Horizon 4, Ghost Recon Breakpoint, and Wolfenstein 2: The New Colossus, there is a performance improvement on average of up to 19% across these games when using the same card and increasing the amount of VRAM from 4GB to 8GB2Newer titles that rely heavily on rendering extremely detailed models such as Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020 are seeing performance improvements of up to 97% when using a graphics card with more graphics memory3.

 

    

 

AMD is leading the industry at providing gamers with high VRAM graphics solutions across the entire product offering. Competitive products at a similar entry level price-point are offering up to a maximum of 4GB of VRAM, which is evidently not enough for todays games. Go Beyond 4GB of Video Memory to Crank Up your settings. Play on RadeonTM RX Series GPUs with 6GB or 8GB of VRAM and enjoy gaming at Max settings.

 

Get Yours Now at the AMD Shop

 

Adit Bhutani is the Product Marketing Specialist for Radeon and Gaming at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

 

  1. Testing done by AMD performance labs 04/5/2020 on Radeon RX 5500XT (4GB vs. 8GB) (Driver: 20.2.2), Intel Core i9 9900K (3.6 Ghz), 16GB DDR4 3200MHz, Gigabyte Z390 Aorus Elite, F7 bios, Win10 Pro x64 18362. Performance may vary. RX-477
  2. Testing done by AMD performance labs 11/29/2019 on Ryzen 5 3600X, 16GB DDR4-3200MHz, ASROCK X570 TAICHI, P1.70A, Win10 Pro x64 18362.175, AMD Driver 19.50. . Using Borderlands 3 @ DX12 High, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare  @ DX12 Ultra, Forza Horizon 4 @ DX12 Ultra, Tom Clancy’s Breakpoint @ DX11 Very High, Wolfenstein: The New Colossus @ Vulkan, Ultra. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Performance may vary. RX-411
  3. Testing done by AMD performance labs 08/17/2020 on Radeon RX 5500 XT 8GB and 5500 XT 4GB GPUs (Driver: 20.8.2), with a Ryzen 7 3800XT processor (3.9 GHz), 16GB DDR4 3200MHz, Gigabyte X570 Aorus Master, F21 bios, Win10 Pro x64 18362. Game tested was Microsoft Flight Simulator 2020 (DX12). Performance may vary. RX-520

 

2020 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, Ryzen, Radeon, and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  Microsoft is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and/or other countries. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

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