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[Originally posted on 02/14/17.]

 

Rebellion has released the newest title in their acclaimed Sniper Elite series, Sniper Elite 4. Each mission can be completed differently as there are so many ways to get through a level. Whether you’re using traps, your sniper rifle or just being super stealthy, the game always feels fresh. Most importantly, the animation when getting a long distance snipe is incredible. As you shoot, the camera pans out to follow the trajectory of your bullet, making every shot feel impactful. The mechanics of the game are the main reason why I love this tactical shooter.

 

As much as I like the mechanics, the performance of this game really puts it together.

 

DirectX® 12 highlights several features supported in Sniper Elite 4, enhancing the experience from DirectX® 11:

 

Asynchronous Shaders—the Asynchronous Compute Engines in AMD’s GCN and Polaris architectures can submit commands without waiting for other tasks to complete. The result is vastly improved GPU efficiency that boosts graphics processing performance, helps reduce latency, and enables consistent frame rates.

 

Multi-GPU experiences have been redeveloped for DirectX® 12, pushing for greater utilization of each GPU in a multi-GPU configuration. AMD’s GCN and Polaris architectures lead with greater performance and scalability in multi-GPU DirectX® 12.

 

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  • Up to 24% faster performance using Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.2.1 using Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 on 8GB Radeon RX 480 graphics GPU than with DirectX®11.1

 

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  • Up to 100% faster performance using RSCE driver 17.2.1 using Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 on 8GB Radeon RX 480 multi-GPU than with 8GB Radeon RX 480 single-GPU.2

 

With an average of 60 FPS and up to perfect 2X multi-GPU scaling, this game performs like a dream. If you’re looking for an amazing tactical stealth shooter with a great PC experience, get Sniper Elite 4 and download Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.2.1 today!3

 

Make sure you’re following Radeon on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram to keep up to date with game performances and Radeon news.

 

 

Gurman Singh, Software Product Marketing for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of February 8th, 2016 on the 8GB Radeon RX 480, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 5960X CPU (3.0 GHz), 16GB DDR4-2666 Mhz system memory, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.2.1 and Windows 10 x64 using the game Sniper Elite 4 on the ultra settings PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 2560x1440, Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition driver 17.2.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 480 running Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®11 scored 48.5 FPS and Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.2.1 running Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 scored 60.0 FPS, which is 24% faster performance. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-110
  2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of February 8th, 2017 on the 8GB Radeon RX 480 in multi-GPU or 8GB Radeon RX 480 in single-GPU, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 5960X CPU (3.0 GHz), 16GB DDR4-2666 Mhz system memory, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.2.1 and Windows 10 x64 using the game Sniper Elite 4 on the ultra settings PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 2560x1440, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.2.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 480 single-GPU running Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 scored 60 FPS, and Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.2.1 and 8GB Radeon RX 480 multi-GPU running Sniper Elite 4 DirectX®12 scored 120 FPS, which is 100% faster performance. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-111
  3. The Rebellion name and logo, the Sniper Elite name and logo and the Sniper Elite Eagle are trademarks of Rebellion and may be registered trademarks in certain countries. © 2017 Rebellion. All rights reserved. DirectX is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other jurisdications.
adam.kozak

Prey: Recommended Settings

Posted by adam.kozak Employee Oct 31, 2018

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[Originally posted on 05/04/17.]

 

Prey is the newest first person action adventure game from Arkane Studios, built upon a highly optimized version of CryEngine. Set aboard a space station in an alternate timeline, Prey is a beautiful, smooth running title, with some really cool shape-shifter effects, and an intriguing story line.

 

Arkane Studios have spent a lot of time working on the PC version of the game, and I’ve been lucky enough to be playing it for a while since it is the first title released under AMD’s large partnership deal announced earlier this year.

 

Performance looks great across most Radeon RX graphics cards, and with my Ryzen 5 1600X system, you can really push up the settings and resolution.

 

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To play this game at decent settings, the recommended requirements are:

  • OS: Windows 10 64bit
  • Processor: AMD FX 8350 or Intel Core i7 2600K or greater
  • Memory: 16 GB RAM
  • Video card: AMD Radeon R9 290 or greater

 

Testing was done after the basic tutorial and first major story twist occurs. I wanted to be able to see the shape shifters and integrate them into the testing.

 

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One thing to note is there are a wide variety of options for PC users, including a few different AA settings that can help push performance, if you really need it. For those of you with widescreen monitors and a RX 580 – this game runs really well. On my new Asus MQ34VQ (3440×1440), I was able to knock down the setting one level to HIGH and still get smooth framerates without FreeSync enabled. With FreeSync enabled, I was able to enjoy smooth gameplay by switching to Very High settings.

 

If you are looking for a few extra frame-rates, consider playing with Screen Space Directional Occlusion, and Screen Space Reflections in the Advanced Settings menu.

 

Here are the recommended settings for 60+ fps across the latest Radeon RX graphics cards.

 

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As always, update to the latest Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver HERE to take advantage of the latest optimizations for Radeon™ graphics cards.

 

 

Adam Kozak, Sr. Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 11/02/17.]

 

A few weeks ago, we sent out this tweet:

 

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Then, proud GPU owners’ photos came flooding in—and we went on a nostalgia trip with these “retro GPUs”. Some of them are only a few years old, but it’s still nice to look back at the cards that once seemed mint and brand-new.

 

Take a look the photos the owners sent of the cards they kept around.

 

@matteopey:

 

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Jarrod (@JarrodsTech)’s MSI R5870:

 

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Stefan (@Misel)’s Rage 128:

 

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Camilo (@MrFusterCluck)’s Sapphire HD 3850:

 

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@Beccdoor‘s HD 3870:

 

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Josh (@joshdalemon)’s HD 4850 Toxic:

 

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Richard (@schlegelrichard)’s MSI X850 XT:

 

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Harry (@cuttsharry123)’s HD 7990 and 9200:

 

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Emilio (@Emilio_ARG)’s HD 5770:

 

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Dave (@Leviathanprim3)’s Radeon 9550:

 

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Øyvind (@Mastromical)’s collection:

 

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Alexander (@grafptitsyn)’s Sapphire HD 4870:

 

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Clint (@Icebug)’s Mach 32:

 

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Stephen O’Brien (@TPJerematic)’s Sapphire HD 2600 Pro:

 

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*All photographs are property of the tagged owner and have been shared with us for this blog.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 06/30/17.]

 

The Radeon™ RX 580 and Radeon™ RX 570 graphics cards have been getting all the spotlight, but what about the rest of the cards in the “Polaris”-based Radeon RX 500 Series family?

 

Today we’re showing some love to the Radeon™ RX 560, an affordable but capable graphics card that packs a lot more pixel-crunching power than you might think. It runs your favorite eSports games without skipping a beat, but it also delivers smooth framerates in more visually demanding AAA titles.

 

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Let’s be real here for a sec… Graphics cards are like our superhero cape. More than any other component, they define both our PC gaming experience and the systems they’re built around. We know our cards inside out—they’re like our weapon of choice, the one we take the most pride in owning. We know how many frames they can hit in certain games, how far we can push those overclocks, and how to keep them running cool inside our rigs.

 

That being said, the Radeon RX 560 is a gem among the RX 500 Series graphics cards—this GPU is capable of pushing hard and overclocking faithfully.

 

We’re gonna take a look at all models using the Radeon RX 560, but today Jason Evangelho took the Sapphire Pulse Radeon RX 560 for a spin along with an AMD Ryzen™ 5 1600X CPU. Here’s a sampling of the framerates he saw across a wide variety of games. (All of these games were played at 1080p.)

 

Here are some of his results:

  • DIRT 4: Medium Quality, 4x MSAA – Average 61 FPS
  • DOOM: Medium Quality, Vulkan API – Average 72 FPS
  • GTA V: High Quality, MSAA X2 – Average 70 FPS
  • Overwatch: Ultra Quality – Average 68 FPS
  • Civilization VI: Medium Quality, DX12 – Average 69 FPS
  • Dota 2: Best Looking – Average 90 FPS
  • Prey: Medium Quality, FXAA – Average 66 FPS
  • Sniper Elite 4: Medium Quality – Average 62 FPS

 

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These are some of today’s most popular titles, and the Radeon RX 560 is more than capable of giving you a fantastic gaming experience. Throw in an affordable Radeon FreeSync™-capable monitor, and you have an awesome hardware combination for smooth, tear-free gaming and very low input lag. Jason saw some great results at Medium settings, and if you bump graphics quality up to High or Ultra for some of these titles, you’ll still get smooth, playable framerates and fantastic visuals.

 

Keep an eye on Radeon.com where we’ll be posting a few more deep dives into the Radeon RX 560. Until then, happy gaming!

 

 

Note: AMD’s product warranty does not cover damages caused by overclocking, even when overclocking is enabled via AMD hardware and/or software. Jason’s results may not be representative of the framerates you may experience, and have not be validated by AMD testing.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 07/16/18.]

 

Whether you are using multiple GPUs in a workstation for a complex rendering job or competing in an intense eSports tournament, seeing a frozen screen indicating that your graphics driver has crashed can be more than just an inconvenience. It can have real costs such as lost productivity and time. Along with the most requested features and top performance, driver stability has always been one of the core priorities of the drivers supporting AMD’s Radeon GPUs. AMD has conducted independent driver audits in 20051 and 20102 which verified the stability of our drivers in those years.

 

A new report3 from QA Consultants4, a Toronto-based software testing and quality assurance firm, has put six of AMD’s most popular cards to the test (high, medium and budget level cards from our Gaming and Workstation lines respectively) to see how our driver holds up against a marathon of intense graphic tests. QA Consultants ran identical tests on the six Nvidia graphics cards that correspond most closely to the tested AMD cards.

 

The Systems:

 

The tested graphics hardware, drivers and system configurations can be found in the table below:

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The Tests:

 

The team at QA Consultants ran each of the systems through multiple instances of CRASH, a four-hour automated program in Microsoft’s Hardware Lab Kit (“HLK”). CRASH contains a variety of graphical functions across DirectX 9, 10 and 11 including changes in resolution, color settings, screen rotations, color overlays, sleeping and waking up. Each system ran the four hour CRASH test, non-stop 6 times per day back-to-back for 12 days (for a total of 72 runs per system). Completing the entire four-hour CRASH routine would be considered a pass. Any application crashes, hangs or “blue screens of death” would be considered an immediate fail. The overall stability score was derived from the total number of passes divided by the total number of attempts. For simplicity, the results for all AMD and Nvidia systems respectively were aggregated into a single score for each of their drivers.

 

The Results:

 

After all tests were run (432 tests across six AMD and six Nvidia systems respectively), AMD systems passed 401 out of 432 tests while Nvidia systems passed 356. This is equivalent to a pass rate of 93% for AMD systems vs a pass rate of 82% for Nvidia systems. According to the QA Consultants report: “AMD has the most stable driver in the industry.”

 

The Takeaway:

 

Driver stability is a consistent priority for AMD and our engineering team is dedicated to testing and refining each new update to ensure users can depend on their Radeon cards. With the results of the QA Consultants report, we’re pleased to see the results of that commitment to stability that we’ll continue into the future of Radeon products.

 

To download a more detailed version of the report, visit: qaconsultants.com/stabilityaudit.

 

 

Andrej Zdravkovic is AMD’s Corporate Vice President of Software and Platform Solutions. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

 

Footnotes:

  1. ATI Catalyst 5.6 Stability Final Report – https://www.amd.com/Documents/AppLabs-Stability-Benchmark-Test.pdf
  2. Project Final Report: Catalyst Stability Testing – https://www.amd.com/Documents/PerseusLabs-Catalyst-Stability-Testing.pdf
  3. “Graphics Driver Quality – Determination of Stability from Leading Market Vendors”- https://www.amd.com/system/files/documents/graphics-driver-quality.pdf
  4. In May 2018, AMD commissioned QA Consultants to independently evaluate the stability of several of the latest graphics drivers from both AMD and NVIDIA.

From the beginning, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor was designed for the world’s fastest and most premium desktop systems. But it also started small: a small skunkworks team of enthusiasts at AMD believed that the users of such systems needed and wanted more than an 8-core AMD Ryzen CPU. The rest is legend. The pace of progress for AMD—and the overall HEDT market—since that little idea has been breathtaking.

 

Where 10 cores once cost $1723 USD (Core i7-6950X), the 1st Gen Ryzen Threadripper CPU delivered 16 cores at half the cost (a 2.5X price/perf leap in one generation).1 Threadripper also delivered the world’s first 16-core desktop CPU, and we challenged our competitor to step it up. Where PCIe® lanes once pointlessly varied with the CPU in the socket, Threadripper made an always-on 64 lanes table stakes. All of that fed into phenomenal acclaim: Ryzen and Threadripper collected 550+ industry awards and accolades in 2017.

 

This momentum served as an exemplary backdrop for the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs we unveiled in August of 2018. Since that time, the initial Ryzen Threadripper 2950X and 2990WX models have secured more than 50 glowing awards in their own right. But we’re not finished! Today we’re unveiling two more 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper models to make the beastly AMD X399 Platform even more accessible to users:

 

  • AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX (24 cores)
  • AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2920X (12 cores)

 

Threadripper X Series Processors

The new AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2920X is the crucial “missing link” for customers who create by day and game by night. With 12 cores and 24 threads, plus new technologies like Precision Boost 2 and AMD StoreMI technology, Threadripper X Series CPUs like the 2920X can game and stream like other processors only dream of.2 And when it’s time to make something beautiful, the 2920X just blows past its competitor in 3D rendering (up to 38% faster) and video encoding (up to 31% faster).3

 

Threadripper WX Series Processors

Some people just want to double down on their content creation performance to tear through their work as quickly as state-of-the-art technology will allow. Time is money, after all. Those people are Threadripper WX Series people. Whether it’s 3D rendering, media encoding, or cinema mastering, the new 24-core AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX is a specialized weapon that’s double-digits faster than the competition in tasks like Blackmagic DaVinci Resolve™, Autodesk Maya® 2018, and Chaos Group V-Ray™.4 Plus, the Ryzen Threadripper WX Series Processors now offer the performance-enhancing Dynamic Local Mode feature!

 

Together, the 2018 Ryzen Threadripper X and WX Series CPUs set the standard for performance, flexibility, features, and value for gamers and creators shopping in the HEDT market. And lest I forget: they’re drop-in compatible with any AMD X399 motherboard, tapping into an awesome ecosystem of great hardware. That’s HEDT done right!

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2920X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX

Transistor Count~9.6 Billion~19.2 Billion
Topology6 Cores ea. in Dies 0,16 Cores ea. in Dies 0,1,2,3
TDP180W250W
Precision Boost Overdrive (OC)5AvailableAvailable
Precision Boost 2EnabledEnabled
PCIe Gen3 Lanes64 (4x reserved for chipset)64 (4x reserved for chipset)
Memory ChannelsQuadQuad
L3 Cache16MB Per Die (32MB Total)16MB Per Die (64MB Total)
L2 Cache512K Per Core (6MB Total)512K Per Core (12MB Total)
Extended Frequency Range 2 (XFR2)EnabledEnabled
Die Size(s)2x 213mm24x 213mm2
Core Count12 Cores, 24 Threads24 Cores, 48 Threads
Boost Frequency4.3GHz4.2GHz
Base Frequency3.5GHz3.0GHz
AMD Suggested Online Price$649 USD$1299 USD

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

FOOTNOTES:

1. Testing by AMD performance labs as of June 27, 2018. Performance per dollar evaluated by dividing the Cinebench R15 nT multithread score by the $USD SEP of the processor. I7-6950X: 2061/$1723 = 1.2 per $ (100% baseline). 1950X: 3042/$999 =  3.0 per $ (150% or 2.5X faster). Intel pricing via ark.intel.com as of 7/24/2018. Intel results obtained from official Cinebench R15 benchmark database on 7/24/2018, results not verified by AMD: https://us.rebusfarm.net/en/tempbench?view=benchmark / https://us.rebusfarm.net/images/benchmarks/1466540143_438.jpg. AMD System Configuration: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X, Asus ROG Zenith X399, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Samsung 960 EVO SSD, Windows 10 x64 RS3. Results may vary with system configuration and drivers. RPM-24

2. Testing by AMD Performance Labs as of 10/4/2018. Application(s) used: Overwatch (4K resolution with High IQ Preset), OBS Video Encoding (40,000Kbps CBR, Faster CPU Usage, High Profile, 3840x2160, Lanczos resize). Results presented in order of Intel vs. AMD (% difference). Overwatch: 91 FPS vs. 76 FPS (19% slower); OBS Encoding Frame Drop Rate: 0% vs. 66%. System configuration(s): ASUS ROG Zenith X399 Extreme + AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2920X vs. ASUS PRIME X299-Deluxe + Core i7-7820X, 4x8GB DDR4-3200C14, Corsair H100 v2 Cooler, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Samsung 850 PRO SSD, Windows® 10 x64 Pro (RS4), Results may vary with system config and drivers. RP-33

3. Testing by AMD Performance Labs as of 10/4/2018. Application(s) used: POV-Ray 3.7 nT (“raytracing”), TrueCrypt 7.1a (“encryption”), 7-Zip 18.01 (“file compression”), Blender Benchmark 1.0beta (3D rendering), HandBrake 1.0.7 (“video encoding”). Scores presented in order of Intel v. AMD (%diff). POV-Ray: 3717 v. 5146 (38.4% faster); TrueCrypt: 10GBps vs. 6 GBps (60% faster); 7-Zip: 49669 MIPS vs. 68924 MIPS (39% faster); Blender: 3798 seconds vs. 2824 seconds (25% faster); Handbrake: 501 seconds vs. 381 seconds (31% faster). System configuration(s): ASUS ROG Zenith X399 Extreme + AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2920X vs. ASUS PRIME X299-Deluxe + Core i7-7820X, 4x8GB DDR4-3200C14, Corsair H100 v2 Cooler, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Samsung 850 PRO SSD, Windows® 10 x64 Pro (RS4), Results may vary with system config and drivers. RP2-31

4. Testing by AMD Performance Labs as of 10/4/2018. Application(s) used: POV-Ray 3.7 nT, Corona 1.3, V-Ray 1.0.8, DaVinci Resolve 15, Maya 2018. Scores presented in order of Intel v. AMD (%diff). POV-Ray: 6370 v. 8429 (32% faster); Corona: 60 seconds vs. 50 seconds (21% faster); V-Ray: 39 seconds vs. 31 seconds (26% faster); DaVinci Resolve: 114 seconds vs. 89 seconds (22% faster); Maya: 157 seconds vs. 135 seconds (14% faster). System configuration(s): ASUS ROG Zenith X399 Extreme + AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX vs. ASUS PRIME X299-Deluxe + Core i9-7960X, 4x8GB DDR4-3200C14, Corsair H100 v2 Cooler, GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Samsung 850 PRO SSD, Windows® 10 x64 Pro (RS4), Results may vary with system config and drivers. RP2-35

5. Precision Boost Overdrive requires a 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper processor with AMD X399 chipset motherboard. Because Precision Boost Overdrive enables operation of the processor outside of specifications and in excess of factory settings, use of the feature invalidates the AMD product warranty and may also void warranties offered by the system manufacturer or retailer. GD-128

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[Originally posted on 04/19/17.]

 

Today we took the esteemed “Polaris” architecture into faster, more refined territory with the launch of our Radeon RX 500 Series, serving up the most compelling reasons yet to upgrade your graphics card.

 

Believe it or not, 9 out of 10 PC gamers are still playing on outdated graphics cards1. Take a minute to really let that sink in. It means not being able to maintain smooth framerates in the newest games. It means being unable to power smooth VR experiences. It means missing out on awesome display tech like HDR2 and Radeon FreeSync3, and on innovative features like Radeon Chill4  that lets users adjust frame rates and save power during gaming.

 

Stepping up from a graphics card like the Radeon RX 380 to the new Radeon RX 580 literally means the difference between ~40 frames per second to a solid 60+ frames per second at 1440p in games like Battlefield 1, Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, Resident Evil 7, For Honor, and DOOM5. To me, that’s a game changer.

 

But hey, I’m a marketing guy. I’d rather have you read the overwhelming praise being served up by the global tech press. So, here’s a comprehensive snapshot of what tech journalists are saying about our Radeon RX 580 and Radeon RX 570 graphics cards.

 

 

“Despite many things pointing to the contrary, this is much more than a rebrand since these cards are being offered with higher clock speeds and some notable updates to their power consumption profiles. Some may argue that a 1340MHz speed bin for Polaris was already widely available on board partners’ overclocked SKUs but now AMD is making those higher clocks the new norm […] Conclusion: One of the best just got better.” – Michael Hoenig, HardwareCanucks

 

“The MSI Radeon RX 570 Gaming X consistently outran the Radeon RX 470 and GeForce GTX 1050 Ti cards” – Marco Chiappetta, HotHardware

 

“[…]both PowerColor’s Red Devil RX 580 and Sapphire’s Nitro+ RX 570 left me impressed. Their hulking size feels a bit out of place, but I can’t argue with the build quality. Both cards are very well built, and both cards are nearly whisper silent while gaming, even with their full factory overclocks in place.” – Ryan Smith, Anandtech

 

“If you’re still using a Radeon HD 7850 or GeForce GTX 660, for example, the RX 580 would be a tremendous step up…In the context of its modern contemporaries, though, Radeon RX 580 helps make up some of GCN’s lost ground against GeForce GTX 1060 6GB in the DirectX 11-based apps where it trailed previously, and extends AMD’s lead in a growing list of DX12 titles. That means you get playable performance at 2560×1440 using the highest quality settings.” – Igor Wallosek, Tom’s Hardware

 

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XFX Radeon RX 580 8GB GTR-S | Photo by Jason Evangelho

 

“The MSI Radeon RX 580 and RX 570 Gaming X cards we tested performed well in our tests. The MSI Radeon RX 580 Gaming X clearly outpaced the Radeon RX 480, and was faster than the GeForce GTX 1060 Founder’s Edition more often than not.” – Marco Chiappetta, HotHardware

 

“I think the RX 580 is the best possible drop-in upgrade solution that money can buy provided your PSU is up to the task of powering it…Not only can this card offer superlative 1080P performance but it has the chops to power through high detail level 1440P content as well. NVIDIA’s GTX 1060 6GB can’t even come close, even when EVGA’s Superclocked edition is thrown into the mix.” – Michael Hoenig, HardwareCanucks

 

“[…]AMD does have a small lead in the bang-per-buck table with the RX 580.” – Antony Leather, Forbes

 

 

Jason Evangelho, Sr. Technical Marketing Specialist for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. PC gamer segmentation based on Steam Hardware Survey Feb 2017. Gamer upgrade estimate based on Steam peak daily users. 88% of users (approximately 9 out of 10 gamers), are gaming on Radeon R9 380X class GPUs or lower resulting in not being able to keep up in the latest games at 2560x1440 resolution including Battlefield 1, Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, For Honor, Doom, and Resident Evil resulting in tearing or being forced to move to lower settings; are unable to drive VR experiences by scoring higher than 6.0 on the SteamVR test; and are missing out on the latest display technologies including 160 FreeSync™ monitors, HDR, DisplayPort and HDMI advances, and game streaming in real-time at 4K resolution.
  2. HDR content requires that the system be configured with a fully HDR-ready content chain, including: graphics card, monitor/TV, graphics driver and application. Video content must be graded in HDR and viewed with an HDR-ready player. Windowed mode content requires operating system support. GD-96
  3. FreeSync disclaimer to use is: Requires a monitor and AMD Radeon™ graphics, both with FreeSync support. Seewww.amd.com/freesync for complete details. Confirm capability with your system manufacturer before purchase. GD-117
  4. Compatible with Radeon™ consumer graphics products in supported DirectX®9 and DirectX®11 games for Windows®7/8.1/10. For more details and a whitelist of supported games, see http://www.amd.com/en-us/innovations/software-technologies/radeon-software/gaming/radeon-chill. GD-115
  5. Testing done by AMD Performance Labs March 9 2017 using an Intel Core i7 5960X (@3.0GHz), 16GB DDR4-2666 MHz memory, AMD display driver 17.10 and Windows 10 (64bit). PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. The following games were tested at 1440p: Battlefield 1 (Ultra Presets, DX12), Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare (High Quality, DX11), For Honor (High Preset, DX11), DOOM (Ultra Presets, Vulkan), and Resident Evil 7 (Ultra Presets, DX11). The Radeon™ RX 580 (8GB) scored 65.0, 66.9, 69.5, 73.3 and 74.2 respectively. The Radeon™ R9 380 (4GB) scored 43.5, 43.2, 40.3, 45.3, and 42.1 respectively. All scores in average FPS and are an average of 3 runs with the same settings. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-92

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[Originally posted on 06/23/17.]

 

Best For:

  • Graphic Design
  • Productivity
  • E-Sports Gaming
  • Long Trips Away from Plug

 

Summary

 

THE SAMSUNG NOTEBOOK 9 PRO IS A PORTABLE AND POWERFUL 2 IN 1 WITH A BUILT-IN S PEN FOR CONTENT CREATION WORKLOADS.

 

At Computex 2017, Samsung announced the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro, their latest convertible laptop offering. The unit we tested was the 15-inch model featuring Radeon™ 540 graphics, Intel i7-7500U, 16 GB of DDR4 Memory and a 256 GB Solid State Drive.

 

Features like S Pen that work with Windows® Ink technology, automatic backlight display, and Samsung RealView Display technology make this a fantastic premium thin & light notebook.

 

Key Specs:

  • 15 Inch Convertible 2-in-1 Laptop
  • 1080p Display
  • S Pen Stylus
  • Intel-i7 processor (7500U)
  • Radeon 540 Graphics (Driver: 17.1.1)
  • 16GB of DDR4 Memory
  • 256 GB Solid State Drive
  • Windows 10 64-bit
  • 1.72 kg (3.79 lbs)

 

Build & Physical Features

 

A well-designed keyboard and track pad are an essential part of any productivity notebook and the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro delivered. I personally press firmly on my keys when typing and the chiclet style keyboard felt solid and had minimal flex. For late night work sessions, the keyboard has an adjustable white backlight that automatically turns on when you head into dimly lit areas.

 

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The track pad was intuitive to use and features gesture and multi finger shortcuts, such as two finger scrolling and pinch to zoom. Left click can be activated by pressing down anywhere on the keypad.

 

One feature we were drawn to is the S Pen that is tucked away just beneath the front of the laptop.  Often found on Samsung mobile and tablet devices, we were happy to see it included on the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro. The S Pen was incredibly precise and responsive with pressure sensitivity and tilt detection. Draw sharp outlines by writing upright or tilt your pen to shade in the areas just like a real pencil.

 

On removal, a set of shortcuts instantly appeared on the screen for the user to select. Starting with the sketchpad, we were impressed at how precise the S Pen was. Pressure sensitivity and tilt are tracked, simulating real drawing and sketching. This experience is topped off with single small button on the side of the stylus for quickly erasing mistakes.

 

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Opening up the Samsung Notebook 9 revealed a M.2 SSD and a dual fan configuration that pulls air from the bottom of the notebook with the exhaust directed out the back. The Samsung Notebook 9 Pro was virtually silent while working at my desk. The fans spooled up during gaming and heavy processing workloads, but remained barely audible unless you put your ear close to the vents. The days of loud fans on all gaming-capable notebooks are over. The M.2 SSD is upgradable if you need more than 256 GB of storage.

 

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All essential ports can be found on the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro. One port to highlight on the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro is the inclusion of USB-C with quick charge capabilities. In case you forget your charger, USB-C can keep you going.

 

Ports:

  • Power Connector
  • 2x USB 3.0 Type-A
  • MicroSD Slot
  • USB-C (Quick Charge Ready)
  • Headphone output
  • HDMI®

 

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All hardware is housed in an excellent lightweight chassis. I could easily move the laptop around with one hand.

 

Display

 

The Samsung Notebook 9 Pro sports an excellent 1080p touchscreen panel with 360 degrees of motion. It can be used as a tablet or a traditional notebook. Colours are bright and sharp and features >95% sRGB coverage and colour accuracy ΔE <2.5. This accuracy was maintained across a large viewing angle. Images on the screen appeared vibrant even when viewing >45 degrees off center.

 

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Indoor

 

In a bright indoor office environment, we used 80 % brightness which still left additional headroom to push the display brighter when watching dark videos.

 

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Outdoor

 

The Samsung Notebook 9 Pro features an impressive outdoor mode that can be activated by a function key directly on the keyboard. Activating outdoor mode pushes the display to 450 nits from 350 nits (indoor mode). We were able to comfortably work outside and enjoy the weather with the Notebook 9 Pro.

 

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Performance

 

Synthetic

 

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Boot Time

 

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To measure the speed of this system I measured boot time from power up to the time my cursor no longer showed the spinning icon. My old work laptop with a HDD drive took over a minute to boot.

 

Hard Drive

 

CrystalDisk Mark was used to measure Hard Drive Performance:

 

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Snappy booting and opening apps can be largely attributed to the SDD. The 256 GB M.2 SSD posted strong read and write speeds. I really believe an SSD is a must-have for any productivity PC.

 

Gaming

 

All tests were done on the latest driver and with the notebook plugged into the wall. For all new laptops, we recommended updating to the latest driver for the best performance.

 

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League of Legends ran amazing and stayed above 100 fps during the game with all settings maxed out at 1080p. The IGP was not able to keep up, we recorded the fps after laning phase and the HD 620 integrated graphics never reached 90 fps and dropped below 60 fps during crucial team fights. The Radeon 540 did not have this issue and stayed above 100 fps on the rift.

 

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The Radeon 540 had ~3X the performance of integrated graphics while running the built-in CIV 6 benchmark running DirectX® 12 on Medium Settings.  The Samsung Notebook 9 Pro notebook experience allowed for smooth scrolling across large detail maps when powered by Radeon 540 graphics.

 

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Productivity

 

Discrete Radeon 540 graphics provided a significant performance uplift in Adobe® Photoshop® and Premiere®.

 

We tested by running a sequence of filters and effects in Adobe Photoshop (2017). A 4K image (300 dpi) was rotated 180 degrees, crystalized by a factor of 10, blurred using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix, sharpened using the Smart Sharpen tool and rotated again by 180 degrees.

 

On Adobe Premiere, we tested with a 30 second 1080p mp4 video. The clip was flipped vertically, lens distortion was applied, and then a blur using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix.

 

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Battery

 

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The battery life on the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro was outstanding. The 54 Wh battery powered the PCMark® 8 Mainstream gaming test for 2.5 hours, while a competitive laptop with 940MX graphics ran out of power after 1.9 hours. Idling with the screen on at 80% (a comfortable indoor brightness) resulted in 12 hours of run time before the notebook auto shutdown.

 

The Samsung Notebook 9 Pro can be charged through the USB-C port located on the left side of the laptop. If you forget your laptop charger, you can now plug into a portable battery pack or smart phone charger and continue working.

 

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Charge time was quick on the laptop. We fully drained the battery, plugged it in and in 1 hour and 23 minutes the battery was back to 100%. The smart phone quick charger took 2 hours to charge the notebook to 50% which is enough to keep your computer running when your laptop charger is not available. Some laptops we’ve tested in the past could only be charged with compatible USB chargers. This is not a problem with the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro, find the nearest phone charger and you are good to go.

 

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Conclusion

 

If you’re looking for a portable light weight productivity laptop the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro should be on your shortlist. The S Pen, beautiful display and discrete Radeon 540 graphics make it ideal for content creation and  gaming on the go. 16 GB of system memory and a 256 GB M.2 form factor make the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro nimble even with a dozen tabs and apps running at the same time. With excellent battery life and a beautifully bright screen; you can confidently work away from a plug for long periods of time.

 

Buy Now:

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Detailed Specs

 

Radeon 540
Clock Speed (Boost)1124 Mhz
Peak Performance (TFLOPS)up to 1.2
Memory2 GB GDDR5
Memory Speed (Effective)up to 6 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth48 GB/s

 

 

Disclosure: This review is written by AMD employee Bryan Kong. Samsung is an AMD OEM customer.

 

 

Bryan Kong, Product Marketing Specialist at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 6/14/2017 on the 2017 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 15”, i7-7500U, Radeon™ 540, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.1.1. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Using the PCMark 10 benchmark, the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro scored 3950 (Total), 6912 (productivity), 7687 (Essentials), 3149 (Digital). Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-127
  2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 6/14/2017 on the 2017 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 15”, i7-7500U, Radeon™ 540, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.1.1. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. The Samsung Notebook 9 Pro took 18 seconds to boot from a powered off state. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-128
  3. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 6/14/2017 on the 2017 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 15”, i7-7500U, Radeon 540, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.1.1. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Using CrystalDiskMark 5.2.1, the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro scored, Seq (Q32T1) Read:541.2MB/s Write:191.2 MB/s, 4K (Q32Ti) Read:294.3 Write:190.4 MB/s, Seq: 507.4 MB/s Write:338.5 MB/s, 4K Read:34.88MB/s Write 65.89. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-129
  4. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 6/14/2017 on the 2017 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 15”, Intel HD620, i7-7500U, Radeon™ 540, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.1.1. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Using 3Dmark TimeSpy, 3DMark FireStrike, League of Legends 1080p Very High and Civilization 6 1080p Medium Benchmark.The Radeon 540 scored 911,2489,117 fps and 35 fps respectively. The Intel HD 620 scored 400, 991, 65 fps and 11 fps respectively.Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-130
  5. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 6/14/2017 on the 2017 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 15”, Intel HD620, i7-7500U, Radeon™ 540, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.1.1. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. When using the Adobe Photoshop (2017) program a 4K image (300 dpi) was rotated 180 degrees, crystalized by a factor of 10, blurred using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix, sharpened using the Smart Sharpen tool and rotated again by 180 degrees. Rendering the picture with CPU took 175 seconds (not using GPU acceleration). The Radeon™ 540 and Intel HD 620 IGP rendered the clip in 37 and 66 seconds respectively with Graphics Acceleration on and with OpenCL enabled. All times are an average of 3 test runs. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-131
  6. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 6/14/2017 on the 2017 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 15”, Intel HD620, i7-7500U, Radeon™ 540, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.1.1. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. When using the Adobe Premier Pro (2017) program a 30-second 1080p mp4 video clip was flipped vertically, lens distortion applied, and blurred using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix.Rendering the picture with CPU took 198 seconds (not using GPU acceleration). The Radeon™ 540 and Intel HD 620 IGP rendered the clip in 27 and 41 seconds respectively with Graphics Acceleration on and with OpenCL enabled. All times are an average of 3 test runs. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-132
  7. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 6/14/2017 on the 2017 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 15”, Intel HD620, i7-7500U, Radeon™ 540, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.1.1 and Acer Aspire F15 15.6”, Intel i7-7500U, Nvidia 940MX, Nvidia Driver 382.53, Windows 10. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. In the Idle battery test, screen 80% brightness, The Samsung Notebook 9 Pro auto-shutdown after 720 minutes. PCMark8 Battery test (Mainstream Gaming 1 and 2) resulted in battery life of 150 minutes for the Samsung Notebook 9 Pro and 115 minutes for the Acer Aspire F15. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-133
  8. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 6/14/2017 on the 2017 Samsung Notebook 9 Pro 15”, Intel HD620, i7-7500U, Radeon™ 540, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.1.1. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. The Samsung Notebook 9 Pro charged from 0-100% in 83 minutes with a laptop charger and 0-50% in 120 minutes with an Adaptive Fast Charger through USB-C. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-134

01.JPG

[Originally posted on 10/02/17.]

 

With Forza Motorsport® 7, Turn 10 Studios brings the thunder. With more than 700 cars, 30+ circuits, dynamic race conditions, more than 300 race suits to customize your driver, and even trucks, Forza Motorsport® 7 is the most beautiful and comprehensive Forza game yet. Add breathtaking visuals with Forza Motorsport’s emphasis on awe inspiring 4K 60FPS gameplay and Forza Motorsport® 7 redefines the iconic Forza series.

 

Here is our performance at a glance with Radeon™ Software 17.9.3:

 

Slide2.jpg

  • Game at beautiful 4K with up to 60FPS using Radeon™ RX 580 and up to 90FPS using Radeon™ RX Vega56 with Radeon Software 17.9.31

 

For gamers who are looking for a crisp 1080p experience, Radeon™ RX 570 and RX 560 have got you covered. Here’s our performance at 1080p:

 

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  • Game at 1080p with up to 95.3FPS using Radeon™ RX 570 and up to 62.7FPS using Radeon™ RX 560 with Radeon Software 17.9.32

 

Download Radeon™ Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.9.3 today and experience the awe of 4K 60FPS gaming with Forza Motorsport® 7.

 

 

Gurman Singh, Software Product Marketing for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of September 28, 2017 on the 8GB Radeon RX 580 and the 8GB Radeon RX Vega56 with Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.9.3, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 7700X CPU (4.2 GHz), 16GB DDR4-3000 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64 using the game Forza Motorsport 7 on the ultra preset. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 3840x2160, 8GB Radeon RX 580 scored 59.8 FPS, and Radeon RX Vega56 scored 89.7 FPS. Results are an average. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-182
  2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of September 28, 2017 on the 4GB Radeon RX 560 and the 4GB Radeon RX 570 with Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.9.3, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 7700X CPU (4.2 GHz), 16GB DDR4-3000 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64 using the game Forza Motorsport 7 on the ultra preset. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 1920x1080, 4GB Radeon RX 570 scored 95.3 FPS, and Radeon RX 560 scored 62.7 FPS. Results are an average. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-183

You might’ve already heard this from other places, but this iteration of Forza Horizon is absolutely the most stunning in the series so far. Playground Games and Microsoft Studio raised the bar significantly with Forza Horizon 4, bringing their cars alive with an endless number of customizations, spectacular roads and an intriguing open world with other wandering players.

 

The maps are gorgeous down to the tiniest of details, and sure, you might be driving by so quickly you may not notice what’s on the road. But all of these add up to a create an incredible atmosphere, from the surface glint of your McLaren Senna to the raindrops splattering on your screen—the attention-to-detail game is strong here. The adrenaline immerses you so deeply in this world, at times you wonder if the in-game screenshots aren’t real-life snapshots.

 

Using our Ryzen™ 7 2700X processor, we looked at the performance of our Radeon™ RX graphics cards—here are our recommended settings to play for an average of 60 FPS:

 

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If you’re playing with a Radeon™ RX 560, I recommend you set your baseline setting at High from a 1080p resolution. If you’d like, you can turn off dynamic optimization and go into the advanced settings to tweak a few of the features. The “High” baseline setting will get you an average of 60 FPS, but you can customize the settings below to get a few extra frames.

 

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Forza Horizon 4 also features a handy benchmark mode, one I’ve used several times testing down the stack. You should run it a few times at different settings before starting up your game and see what setting you’re most satisfied with. The mode runs through a few dynamic scenes to check your hardware’s performance, and its final report is highly detailed. Makes me wish all benchmark modes were like this:

 

2018.10.17-14.39.png

 

To keep those frames smooth throughout, every Radeon™ RX graphics card should be paired with a FreeSync-capable monitor. Take advantage of what your GPU and your display can do together, and make sure FreeSync is enabled under your driver settings and your monitor setting itself—certainly an advantage for a fast-paced game like Forza Horizon 4.

 

When you’ve got all that settled, do a quick check for latest Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition driver downloaded on your system to make sure you’re playing with the latest optimizations.

 

Forza Horizon 4 is available now for PC on the Windows Store. It’s a Forza title that’ll keep you occupied for a while, so share some of your best shots or clips with us using Radeon ReLive on social on @AMDGaming.

 

Annie Lee is Sr. Product Marketing Specialist at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 02/14/17.]

 

As someone who is not usually a stealth gamer, I do have a soft spot in my heart for the Sniper Elite series.  Rebellion has honed their craft perfectly for the fourth installment of the series which places you in Italy circa 1943.

 

This version offers a DirectX™ 12 mode and leverages async compute for owners of Radeon graphics cards.  In a few cases I tried out, it ended up providing some really nice frame rate boosts, the difference of playing below 60 fps, to playing nicely above 60 fps.

 

02-SE4_image_03_4K-1244x700.jpg

 

To play this game at decent settings, the requirements are:

  • OS: Windows 7 64bit / 8.1 64bit / 10 64bit
  • Processor: AMD FX4300 or Intel Core i3 or greater
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • Video card: AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB) or greater

 

There are a lot of options in the graphics menu, and they are nicely contained in 4 presets, Low, Medium, High, and Ultra.

 

For my testing I played through the opening sequence of Sniper Elite 4, until I subdued the first 3 enemies, and made it up into a clearing.  The result was smooth gameplay on Radeon RX graphics cards, with high details and high resolutions PC gaming is known for.

 

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If you are like me, this game has a certain enjoyable factor with every slow motion achievement you complete, and makes it highly entertaining guessing where your next shot ends up.  I’d also note that I am a single player type of gamer, so these results were all done in the campaign mode.

 

As always, update to the latest Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver HERE and save the world yet again.

 

 

Adam Kozak, Sr. Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

01-fs2_feature.png

[Originally posted on 01/03/17.]

 

Radeon FreeSync™ technology has tremendous momentum in the market today. With over 100 FreeSync-enabled monitors to choose from currently, gamers love the smooth, tear-, and stutter-free PC gaming they enable. I’m a proud owner of a FreeSync display myself, and quite frankly whenever I sit down in front of a rig that doesn’t support variable refresh rate, I immediately notice that something is off.

 

I can’t go back to non-FreeSync gaming. It’s one of those events that changed my experience so fundamentally that I can’t go back to the way it was, like discovering DVD quality after years of VHS or seeing 1080p for the first time.

 

 

Another such revolution is upon us in content quality. You’ve probably heard the term HDR, or High Dynamic Range many times before. There are two definitions of HDR* formats today that are most popular (HDR10 and Dolby Vision), and both use similar specifications. They represent a gigantic leap forward in image quality, defined by brightness, contrast and color volume.

 

HDR today is primarily driven by TV manufacturers, first and foremost for movies. Today’s televisions are shipping with crazy-high luminance, contrast ratio, and fairly good color gamut support. They are very well suited to display movie content in HDR. The HDR movie-playback pipeline is pretty simple: the content is encoded in an HDR10 or Dolby Vision container, and the TVs process it. Why is this important?

 

The mentioned formats follow strict specifications for luminance, contrast ratio and color space. Though today’s HDR TVs are very capable, they’re nowhere near the theoretical maximum of HDR10/Dolby Vision. These TVs are also not all the same; some may have higher or lower capabilities for brightness, contrast and color than others, and the content can’t account for all these variations. Some conversion has to be done by the TV’s system-on-chip, where it maps the content to the TV’s actual capabilities. This process is called tone mapping.

 

So what’s the situation with HDR gaming? It’s not anything new for game developers. Their engines are already capable of increasing brightness, contrast, and to some degree, widen the color space as well to some of the new specifications defined by the SMPTE. There are games, in fact, available for today’s game consoles that support HDR.

 

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What about PC gaming, then? With Radeon FreeSync™ 2 technology, we want smooth gaming and HDR content to go hand-in-hand. So why not use the already existing methods to do so?

 

One key criterion for PC gamers is to have low latency. We can’t tolerate lag while gaming. Unfortunately, the mentioned tone mapping process in displays can cause a delay —sometimes as high as 100 miliseconds. This is not acceptable for PC gaming. FreeSync™ 2 technology circumvents this issue by taking the burden of tone mapping off the display and moving it to our powerful GPUs. This allows the game engine to map content directly to the display’s target brightness, contrast and color values.

 

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HDR10 vs FreeSync 2 pipeline

 

FreeSync™ 2 technology will enable an ecosystem of games and displays that bring smooth and brilliant gaming to life. We’re working with game developers to take advantage of our FreeSync™ 2 extension into their games which render in HDR. We’re also collaborating with most major PC display vendors to bring this capability to their products. And, we’re defining a high bar for monitors to qualify for FreeSync™ 2—they will have to have a certain minimum in brightness, contrast and colorspace, and all this at very low latency.

 

HDR games are the next frontier for PC gamers. FreeSync™ 2 technology is an excellent foundation for an ecosystem of HDR content—and the path to pixel perfect smooth gaming.

 

 

Antal Tungler, Sr. Technical Marketing Manager for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

*: HDR content requires that the system be configured with a fully HDR-ready content chain, including: graphics card, monitor/TV, graphics driver and application. Video content must be graded in HDR and viewed with an HDR-ready player. Windowed mode content requires operating system support.

01-AMD_ExtravaLANza_2017-38.jpg

[Originally posted on 11/30/17.]

 

EA is back with an excellent follow up to 2015’s Star Wars: Battlefront, that adds a single player campaign (thank-you), to an already strong multi-player masterpiece.  Powered by the brilliant Frostbite engine, the visuals are nothing short of gorgeous.  Add to that the capability of DirectX™ 12 and the addition of HDR, and you’ve got one of the best games to show off the hardware of your PC.

 

Performance looks great on Radeon™ RX Series graphics, and and my AMD Ryzen 5 1600X system was able to push framerates well into typical Radeon FreeSync ranges and averaged above 60 FPS quite easily (that means silky smooth gameplay).

 

Recommended System Requirements:

  • CPU: AMD FX8350 or Intel Core i7-6700
  • RAM: 16 GB
  • OS: Windows 10 64-bit
  • Video Card: Radeon™ RX 480 or higher

 

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As always, head to AMD.com and make sure you are using the latest driver with the latest optimizations HERE.

 

 

Adam Kozak, Sr. Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

01-evil-within-top-image.png

[Originally posted on 10/13/17.]

 

It’s Friday the 13th and The Evil Within® 2 is now available. Created by Tango Gameworks and published by Bethesda Softworks, this third-person thriller comes right before Halloween and is sure to give you an early scare.

 

The Evil Within 2 is a graphically stunning game that brings monsters and supernatural events to life on your quest to save your daughter. Jump into a twisted, alternate reality where nothing is as it seems while facing horrifying creatures, witnessing murders and possibly losing some limbs along the way.

 

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I ran The Evil Within 2 on the latest 17.10.1 Radeon driver on an AMD Ryzen™ 1600X system targeting 60 fps with our Radeon RX graphics cards.

 

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If you get scared easily, I highly recommend you play with the lights on.

 

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Don’t forget to download the latest driver (17.10.1) HERE which adds Radeon Chill support.

 

 

Bryan Kong, Product Marketing Specialist at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 06/09/17.]

 

The iconic DiRT® Series returns with the 4th installment on June 9th. DiRT 4, developed by Codemasters, is an off-road racing game that puts you behind the wheel of over 50 amazing rally cars, rallycross vehicles, buggys and trucks. Show off your driving skills and pull off e-brake turns on beautiful stages and circuits around the world.

 

The game is extremely well optimized and ran great across all Radeon™ RX 500 series graphics cards paired with my RYZEN™ 1700X. I started off with a couple of training runs and before long I was ready to start my own Radeon RX racing team in career mode.

 

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The recommended system requirements for DIRT 4 are:

  • OS: Windows 10 64bit
  • Processor: AMD FX 8320 or Intel Core i5 4690 or greater
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • Video card: Radeon™ R9 390 or greater

 

I tested each of the cards on the Liske Forest course with my red and black Ford Fiesta. The Radeon™ RX 580 and 570 cards ran at maximum settings (Ultra) at 1440p and 1080p respectively. No tweaks to the advanced settings were necessary. The outstanding optimizations in DIRT 4 provided enough headroom for me to maintain 60+ fps on ultrawide displays, 3440×1440 on the Radeon RX 580 and 2560×1080 for the Radeon RX 570 running on the same Ultra settings.

 

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Despite a couple barrel roll crashes, I had a lot of fun testing this game. DiRT 4 has got me back into the racing genre and I’ll be playing more this weekend. There’s something very satisfying about executing an extended drift around a corner at high speeds. I highly recommend playing the game with a racing wheel or a gamepad controller for the best experience.

 

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For the best performance possible, make sure you grab the latest copy of the Radeon™ Software Crimson Edition driver.

 

 

Bryan Kong, Product Marketing Specialist at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

Call of Duty® is back, and there’s been high anticipation around this one since its announcement—so we’ve been eager to jump into this one.

 

The beloved franchise returns with its familiar multiplayer and zombie modes, but also with a new addition: the battle royale Blackout mode. It brings with it the largest map featured in any Call of Duty game and features characters across the Black Ops series, not to mention excitement among all of us to throw ourselves into a battle royale set in the Call of Duty universe.

 

Treyarch and Activision’s latest title is optimized very well for PC. I tested the Radeon™ RX stack with a Ryzen 7 2700X, and here are our recommended settings to hit an average of 60 FPS at each resolution:

 

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Maintaining a 60 FPS average with your Radeon™ RX graphics card won’t be an issue. Mainstream users with a Radeon™ RX 560 will be able to play this title very well at 1080p, hitting just over 60 FPS at High settings.

 

There are plenty to toy around with under the Graphics setting if you want to extract more frames, as you may lose a few in the more action-heavy scenes. Lowering a few of the texture qualities or post processing effects will help you keep a steady 60 FPS average, depending on which ones you’re okay with decreasing.

 

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Either way, the differences are subtle and lowering some of the features to Medium on a Radeon™ RX 560 isn’t anything dramatic. You’ll hardly notice, as it plays incredibly well overall.

 

You should have your Radeon™ RX graphics card paired with a FreeSync™ capable monitor to keep your images smooth even when your frames dip, so make sure FreeSync is enabled on your driver (or your monitor). Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 also comes ready with support for FreeSync 2 HDR, so if you have a FreeSync 2 HDR monitor you can experience the game with its vivid, brilliant colors through various scenes.

 

 

For Radeon™ RX 570 owners or above, you’ll have no problem hitting a 60+ FPS average at 1080p or 1440p. If you have a Radeon™ RX Vega 56 or 64, you can crank it up to 4K.

 

Whichever Radeon™ RX graphics card you’re equipped with, Activision and Treyarch did a phenomenal job of optimizing the latest Call of Duty iteration on PC. You should also make sure you have our latest driver downloaded, Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition 18.10.1, which includes optimizations for Call of Duty: Black Ops 4.

 

Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 is available now on the Blizzard shop in Standard, Deluxe and Deluxe Enhanced editions.

 

Don’t forget to tag us in a post or two of some of coolest moments at @AMDGaming. We’re keen to see some of those battle royale victories.

 

Annie Lee is Sr. Product Marketing Specialist at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

Not long ago, AMD unveiled the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper WX Series processors with record-setting performance for serious content creation applications that generally scale across many CPU cores. The AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper 2970WX and 2990WX achieved such breakneck performance with 24 or 32 cores spread across four processor dies: two with direct access to local memory, and two with access to memory via the Infinity Fabric. This smart design enabled backwards compatibility with existing AMD X399-based motherboards, too!

 

The AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2970WX and 2990WX have four dies containing 6 or 8 cores each, respectively. Two of the dies have direct memory access (blue), and two access memory over the Infinity Fabric (red).

 

What about apps that weren’t designed to be so scalable? There are instances where the entire application (“process”), or specific workloads spawned by that process (“threads”), can achieve the best performance when they’re executed on the two CPU dies with local/direct memory access. We’ve been working hard to extend a helping hand to these applications, and we looked to our past for inspiration.

 

Thinking back to the 1st Generation AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper processor, AMD Ryzen™ Master was updated to add a toggle for Local Mode or Distributed Mode. These modes tuned the performance of applications that preferred lower memory latency or higher memory bandwidth, respectively. This capability required a system reboot but, according to reviewers like TechSpot, there was a clear performance upside when an application was paired with its most favored mode.

 

With the “favored modes” in mind, that brings us to today. What if Ryzen™ Threadripper WX Series CPUs could have some sort of “favored mode” to ensure the best performance for both heavy and lightly-threaded apps? What if it could be switched on the fly without a reboot? All of this is possible with a new feature we’re calling Dynamic Local Mode.

 

What is Dynamic Local Mode?

Dynamic Local Mode is a new piece of software that automatically migrates the system’s most demanding application threads onto the Threadripper™ 2990WX and 2970WX CPU cores with local memory access. In other words: the apps that prefer local DRAM access will automatically receive it, and apps that scale to many cores will be free to do so.

 

What is the Benefit of Dynamic Local Mode?

In the applications we have tested to date, AMD has observed performance improvements of up to 47% with Dynamic Local Mode enabled.1 The below diagram shows a variety of games and applications aided by the new feature, and AMD expects other applications that we have not yet analyzed may also benefit. But we also want to be clear about the fact that not every application will see a benefit, as not every application demonstrates the threading behaviors that Dynamic Local Mode is designed to assist. Even so, it's clear that some processes really take a liking to Dynamic Local Mode and it's quite satisfying to see such a speedup from a new and free feature for your platform.

 

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See footnotes at the end of this blog for system configuration and raw data. Please note that your results may vary with system configuration and drivers.

 

How is Dynamic Local Mode implemented?

Dynamic Local Mode is implemented as a Windows® 10 background service that measures how much CPU time each thread on the system is consuming. These threads are then ranked from most to least demanding, and the top threads are automatically pushed to the CPU cores that contain direct memory access. Once these cores are consumed by work, additional threads are scheduled and executed on the next available CPU core. This process is continuous while the service is running, ensuring the most demanding threads always get preferential time on cores with local memory. (As a corollary, insignificant threads are pushed to other dies.)

 

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How is Dynamic Local Mode different from Local Mode?

A bit of background is required to answer this question. For AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ X Series CPUs, every processor die has directly-connected memory. Local Mode and Distributed Mode change how the operating system sees these CPUs:

  • In Local Mode, the OS sees two partitions called “NUMA nodes,” each with one die’s worth of CPU cores and RAM. Local Mode sends hints to the OS that threads and their memory contents should be kept within the same node (if possible) to minimize memory latency.
  • In Distributed Mode, the OS sees a single large pool (“UMA node”) with all available dies and memory grouped together.

But, in a system where not every die has direct memory access, the system must necessarily be configured with four NUMA nodes: two with CPU cores plus local RAM, two with CPU cores and no local RAM. Threads will always fill the nodes with local memory first, but this is a first-come, first-served affair in Windows® that sometimes results in threads being executed remotely from their memory footprint.

 

In such a system, some other mechanism is needed to preferentially execute threads on cores with local memory. Dynamic Local Mode is spiritually like Local Mode in that it also endeavors to keep threads and their memory contents together. However, unlike traditional Local Mode, Dynamic Local Mode:

  1. Operates on-the-fly without a reboot to toggle between modes
  2. Ensures that demanding threads are executed on dies with local memory
  3. Does not fundamentally change how the operating system sees the processor’s resources

 

What if I want to disable Dynamic Local Mode?

Dynamic Local Mode is configured as a Windows service. You may simply stop and disable the service to prevent Dynamic Local Mode from running, or you can toggle the feature on and off within AMD Ryzen™ Master.

 

What processors is Dynamic Local Mode for?

Just to be clear, Dynamic Local Mode is a new feature for the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2990WX and 2970WX processors. Only these AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors have a mixed memory access design wherein some dies have direct memory access, while others access memory across the Infinity Fabric.

 

Dynamic Local Mode available starting October 29th

Beginning October 29th, Dynamic Local Mode will be a new package included with the latest version of AMD Ryzen™ Master. Downloading AMD Ryzen™ Master on or after the afternoon of 10/29 will automatically configure Dynamic Local Mode on your system if it contains an AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper 2990WX or 2970WX processor (also available starting 10/29). Looking further ahead, AMD also plans to open the feature up to even more users by including Dynamic Local Mode as a default package in the AMD Chipset Drivers.

 

Let the countdown begin! We’re looking forward to your feedback.

 

 


 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

Footnotes:

1. Testing by AMD Performance Labs as of 10/4/2018. Results presented in order of Dynamic Local Mode OFF vs. ON (% difference). All games tested at 1920x1080 with the graphics API and in-game graphics preset noted. Far Cry 5 (DirectX 11/Ultra): 48 FPS vs. 53 FPS (10% faster); PUBG (DirectX 11/Ultra): 99 FPS vs. 111 FPS (12% faster); Battlefield 1 (DirectX 12/Ultra): 136 FPS vs. 200 FPS (47% faster); Alien: Isolation (DirectX® 11/Ultra): 199 FPS vs. 234 FPS (18% faster); Unreal Engine Compile Time: 954 seconds vs. 810 seconds (15% faster); SPECwpc® V2.1 Rodinia euler3d_cpu: 4.25 vs. 3.36 (21% faster). Average of results less Battlefield 1 outlier: 15.2% faster. System configuration: AMD Ryzen Threadripper Reference Motherboard, AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX, 4x8GB DDR4-3200, GeForce GTX 1080 (driver 399.24), Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Windows 10 Pro x64 (RS4). Results may vary with drivers and system configuration. SPECwpc® V2.1 is the latest version of SPECwpc® as of 9 October, 2018. Additional information about the SPEC benchmarks can be found at www.spec.org/gwpg. RP2-36

The Assassin’s Creed series returns in an ancient Greece setting this year, just after the Peloponnesian War—and it’s shaping up to be a fantastic addition to the franchise. Featuring more RPG elements than before, this iteration has you pausing between dialogue choices, customizing your skills through the skill tree, immersing in well-written side quests and delightfully, indulging in a bit of romance.

 

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Starting off with your initial protagonist choice between Alexios or Kassandra, you start building upon their sassy base personality immediately (I chose Kassandra, and simply put, she’s witty, badass and hilarious).

 

There are numerous RPG elements to discover as you dive further into the game, making Assassin’s Creed Odyssey the most unique and dynamic adventure in the series yet. By the time I left my home island sailing for adventure, I had plenty of choices to make: which side do I choose in this overarching war? Which mercenary do I hunt down before they get to me first? Do I kill the soldiers who attacked me or let them go?

 

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And then there are the choices you make that will have heavy repercussions later, even when you think you’ve made the morally correct choice. There is no right or wrong: you shape your own path in Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, and no doubt you’ll pause at several moments torn between one choice or another.

 

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If you want to get started with Assassin’s Creed Odyssey, the ancient Greece setting is breathtaking when you pair your Radeon™ RX graphics card with a FreeSync-capable monitor. We highly recommend you take advantage of Radeon FreeSync™, as this technology will make sure your frames are kept smooth and stutter-free during action-heavy scenes.

 

Here’s what Ubisoft recommends for PC specs targeting 30 FPS:

 

 

Minimum

Recommended

Recommended 4K

CPU

AMD FX 6300 @ 3.8 GHz

Ryzen 3 – 1200

AMD FX-8350 @ 4.0 GHz

Ryzen 5 - 1400

AMD Ryzen™ 1700X @ 3.8 GHz

GPU

AMD Radeon™ R9 285

AMD Radeon™ R9 290

AMD Radeon™ Vega 64

 

This setup offers a smooth experience while you venture through Assassin’s Creed Odyssey’s ancient Greek world, whether you’re hunting down mercenaries or sailing through the warring seas. The open-world sea combat, which returns to Assassin’s Creed Odyssey in full naval scale, feels awesome in this title—especially when FreeSync™’s stutter-free tech kicks in for your glorious ship Adrestia glide through the waters like cutting through butter.

 

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This is an Assassin’s Creed title you’ll be spending countless hours on, with so much to explore outside the main story.

 

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey is available now, or you can pick it up as part of our Raise the Game bundle; when you buy a Radeon™ RX Vega, RX 580 or RX 570 graphics card, you’ll also pick up the title for free (plus two other games, Strange Brigade and Star Control: Origins).

 

 

Before starting, make sure you download the latest AMD driver. You’ll have plenty of moments where you’re in awe of the beautiful ancient Greek scenery, so share your screenshots or clips with us using Radeon ReLive—and don’t forget to tag us on @AMDGaming/@Radeon on Twitter or @AMD on Instagram.

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 09/20/17.]

 

It’s been seven years since the last Quake game and id Software is back in a big way with Quake Champions. Paying homage to the original Quake games, Quake Champions is a fast-paced arena style FPS that keep you on your toes at all times.

 

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The game has a current roster of eleven  unique champions and it continues to grow. Each champion has a unique ability and characteristics for competitors of all playstyles. If you prefer agility in the arena, try out Slash or Nyx. If you prefer a beefy enforcer, Scalebearer or Clutch may be the champion for you.

 

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Performance looks great on the Radeon™ RX Series products. I was able to push above 100 FPS at various resolutions and quality settings with all of our gaming graphics cards paired with my AMD Ryzen 7 1700X system.

 

Recommended System Requirements:

  • CPU: AMD A10-7870K or Intel i5-2400
  • RAM: 8 GB
  • OS: Windows 7 and later
  • Video Card: Radeon™ R9 390X or higher

 

I tested the game in live team Deathmatch battles as Nyx with our exclusive Radeon Ruby skin.

 

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One thing to note are the minimum framerates I saw when testing each of the cards. Even in the chaotic arena with eight people, minimum framerates stayed above 60 fps. I didn’t run into any stuttering or graphical hitches. Quake Champions is the fastest and most responsive shooter I’ve played. It is a true test of your FPS ability and there is no room for error or graphical glitches. A fraction of a second determines if you frag your opponent or get fragged.

 

For serious gamers, I highly recommend a 144Hz display with Radeon™ FreeSync technology to help ensure you have a competitive edge over your opponents by having a smoother and responsive experience.

 

Settings below are what I used to achieve 100+ fps on my AMD Ryzen 7 1700X based system. Auto Detect Settings changes the resolution scaling which has a significant impact to fps. If you’re looking to tweak performance be sure to experiment with both the resolution scale and graphics quality.

 

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Adam Kozak, Sr. Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 12/04/17.]

 

If you’re looking for a reliable GPU upgrade, look no further than the Radeon RX™ 550.

 

Whether you’re playing a round of Overwatch or gearing up for a Dota 2 match, the Radeon RX 550 is the card that can transform your PC into a solid eSports gaming machine.

 

Behind the screen, here’s the only thing you should worry about: set your strategies, clear obstacles, attain victory. Inside your machine, the Radeon RX 550 will take care of the rest: pump out stutter-free frames with its FreeSync™-ready capabilities1, boost you through intense moments with Radeon Software and push performance to its limit so you can make every moment of your game count.

 

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I know how crucial every second is when you’re playing a match. The moment the countdown is at 0 and you run to your point to prepare the defense, the worst thing that could happen is losing time—which effectively hands the advantage over to your competition. And that lost split-second could be the deciding factor in your loss.

 

Well, we like to look at life half-full. eSports enthusiasts can’t afford this risk, especially when you’re playing in a tournament with so much at stake. Instead of worrying about a split-second that could tank your game, rely on the Radeon RX 550 graphics card to power your real-time instincts and be a deciding factor in your victory.

 

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To show off the Radeon RX 550’s effortless capabilities, I took the MSI Radeon RX 550 for a spin on some of today’s most popular eSports games. I played all these titles on my AMD Ryzen™ 5 1600X processor powered rig at 1080p.

 

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GameSettingAverage FPS
StarCraft IIUltra70
Quake ChampionsHigh (50% resolution)87
OverwatchHigh60
CS:GOHigh114
Rocket LeagueHigh89
League of LegendsVery High157

 

The Radeon RX 550 is more than capable of delivering the frames needed in these games, so set up that next match: the Radeon RX 550 graphics card’s got you covered.

 

Shop the Radeon RX 550:

NEWEGG

AMAZON

BEST BUY

 

Keep a close eye on more Radeon news and deals on our Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Requires a monitor and AMD Radeon™ graphics, both with FreeSync support. See www.amd.com/freesync for complete details. Confirm capability with your system manufacturer before purchase. GD-127

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[Originally posted on 10/05/17.]

 

Turn 10 is back with Forza Motorsport 7, now available for Windows® 10 and Xbox One systems.

 

I fired up the game on our AMD Ryzen 5 1600X to get a handle of just which video card worked best to give me a consistent 60fps.

 

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Forza Motorsport 7 Preview Different Cars

 

I just ran the benchmark to see which settings made sense, and also decided to also give the game a try to see how well my numbers correlated.  To my surprise performance generally stayed the same and the recommended settings didn’t change.

 

The good news is that even a Radeon RX 550 is going to play this game well at 1080p medium settings.  Higher cards are going to be able to go up to Ultra at their respective resolutions, making this a very system friendly title to add to your PC collection.

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As always, download our latest Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition drivers to get the best experience (17.9.3 or later).

 

Now back to perfecting my full speed crashing technique…

 

 

Adam Kozak, Sr. Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 11/29/17.]

 

The legendary Call of Duty® series is back with its latest installment set in World War II. Published by Activision and developed by SledgeHammer games, travel back in time and relive some of the most significant battles in history in Call of Duty: World War II. Join your brothers in arms and fight against the Axis powers.

 

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Recommended System Requirements:

  • OS: Windows 7 64-Bit or later
  • Processor: AMD Ryzen™ 5 1600X (or Intel® Core™ i5 2400)
  • Memory: 12 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Radeon™ RX 580 or better

 

Visually this game is incredible. Sprint up the battlefield and infiltrate enemy strongholds. Explosions happen all around you, realistic clouds form and shrapnel cuts through the air with a stunning amount of detail. This game feels like a live action movie, effects, shadows and textures are realistic and require a significant amount of graphics horsepower to drive an immersive experience.

 

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Radeon™ RX graphics are ready to place you in the center of legendary battles. Tested on my AMD Ryzen™ 7 1700X processor powered rig with 16GB ram, here are my recommended settings targeting 60+ fps.

 

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For the best experience in Call of Duty: WWII, grab the latest Radeon™ Software Crimson ReLive Edition Driver: HERE

 

 

Bryan Kong, Product Marketing Specialist at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 08/14/17.]

 

You’ve heard us talk about Radeon RX Vega: the next-generation architecture, new geometry engine, high bandwidth cache, 4K gaming, next-level VR and a fantastic ecosystem with Radeon™ FreeSync technology.

 

But now, after unveiling our next high-end generation of Radeon graphics cards at SIGGRAPH 2017, Radeon RX Vega hits shelves today and are now available for enthusiast gamers everywhere.

 

We’ve uncovered the coming extreme gaming era two weeks ago. We showed off the bundles you can get, to enter into a great gaming ecosystem. We’ve shown how others are rallying around Radeon RX Vega. Now, it’s time for you to experience it for yourself.

 

The Choice is Yours

 

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Check the following etailers for the Radeon RX Vega 64  graphics card:

 

Newegg (USA)

 

Amazon (USA)

 

Be sure to check back on this blog for more links.

 

Read up on our available bundles—Radeon Red Pack ($499 USD), Radeon Black Pack ($599 USD) and Radeon Aqua Pack ($699)—if you’re interested in grabbing a full gaming ecosystem along with your Radeon RX Vega 64 graphics card. See the full details on the bundles here.

 

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Show Off Your Station

 

Once you claim a Radeon RX Vega graphics card as your own, you’ll want to show off your rig… and we want to see it.

 

Tag us with your rig on Twitter or Instagram with #RXVega—we’ve entered into this era together, and we want to be a part of this chorus for the next-generation, powerhouse battle stations in the PC gaming space.

 

 

Gear up for tomorrow’s games—learn more about why Radeon RX Vega is the graphics card for you and how it’ll prepare you for this extreme era of PC gaming.

 

Follow Radeon on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram for everything Radeon RX Vega-related.

 

 

Annie Lee, Product & Content Marketing at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

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[Originally posted on 07/17/17.]

 

HP recently released their newest Omen 17 gaming laptop, and it’s packing the power of Radeon RX 580 graphics for maxed-out 1080p visuals and memorable VR experiences. Radeon FreeSync is also on board for smooth, tear-free gaming. Let’s take a closer look!

 

BEST FOR:

  • Smooth, High Quality 1080p/60Hz Gaming
  • VR Premium Gaming & Experiences on Oculus Rift and HTC Vive
  • HD Media Consumption
  • Desktop replacement

 

KEY HARDWARE SPECS

  • Radeon RX 580 8GB GPU
  • 17.3” 1080p IPS display
  • Intel Core-i7 7700HQ Processor
  • 1TB 7200 RPM Hard Drive
  • 12GB DDR4 RAM
  • Bang & Olufsen Speaker System
  • Weight: 8.3 pounds

 

BUILD AND PHYSICAL FEATURES

 

The HP Omen 17 makes an attractive first impression with its red and black Omen logo etched onto the brushed aluminum lid (we may be a little biased about that color choice). It’s just the right aesthetic to suggest a hint of luxury beneath its enthusiast gaming exterior.

 

Opening the lid reveals a full-size keyboard with both red accents and red backlighting, along with WASD keys that have a splash of white to immediately draw your fingers to the right place, even in low-lit environments. It’s a keyboard that’s great to look at, with satisfying travel and responsiveness.

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Moving to the sides of the laptop, you realize HP isn’t skimping on connectivity. With USB C, USB 3.0, SD card slot, miniDP + HDMI out, and Ethernet, it has enough ports to double as a suitable desktop replacement.

 

DISPLAY

 

The 1080p IPS display is bright and crisp, and it brings FreeSync along for the ride, giving you smooth framerates, no screen tearing, and reduced input lag compared to screens without variable refresh rates enabled. It’s a transformative technology and a real value-add for any Radeon-based system, so it’s great to see it on a flagship HP system like this. Bonus points for the anti-glare screen, which means you can use the Omen 17 outside without any nasty interference from the pesky summer sun.

 

GAMING PERFORMANCE

 

But let’s get to the big question: what about gaming performance? Since the Omen 17 rides the line between portable and desktop replacement, a 1080p/60fps experience is a must. Good news, then, that it handles the most visually demanding AAA games effortlessly.

 

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The Radeon RX 580 spits out an average 66FPS on Rise of the Tomb Raider’s Very High setting and an astounding 73FPS average on HITMAN’s Ultra quality setting with AFx8. Dirt Rally turns in more than 80FPS on the racer’s Ultra setting.1

 

DOOM fans will be thrilled to know that thanks to Vulkan® optimizations, iD’s latest shooter kicks out a blistering 120+ FPS. And that’s running on Ultra, the highest quality setting available.1

 

Overall, it’s an attractive package for gamers looking for a desktop replacement or a reasonably priced notebook that can handle anything you throw at it.

 

 

Jason Evangelho, Sr. Technical Marketing Specialist for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/03/2017 on the 2017 HP Omen 17 Laptop, i7-7700HQ, Radeon™ RX 580, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.4.4. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Using DOOM, Dirt Rally, HITMAN on Ultra quality settings at 1080p. Using Rise of the Tomb Raider on Very High quality settings at 1080p. The HP Omen 17 Laptop scored 120, 80, 73, and 66 fps respectively. RX-139

[Originally posted on 08/10/17.]

 

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BEST FOR:

  • Productivity
  • E-Sports Gaming
  • Movies / Music

 

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Summary

 

The HP Power Pavilion 15 Featuring Radeon RX 550 Graphics is a well styled notebook with serious system specs to power gaming and content creation.

 

With a long history in desktop and notebooks, a relatively new addition to the Pavilion brand, Power Pavilion, targets itself towards prosumers looking for a solid set of hardware and storage features.  With some beefy storage specs, discrete graphics armed with full 128-bit performance, and a visual identity sure to stand out from the rest, the Power Pavilion line gets some nice new spec upgrades with the latest Intel i5 7300HQ and Radeon™ RX 550 graphics.

 

Key Hardware Specs Reviewed: 15 Inch Notebook

  • 1080p Display
  • Intel-i5 processor (7300HQ)
  • Radeon™ RX 550 Graphics (Driver: 17.6.2)
  • 8GB of DDR4 Memory
  • 2TB Hard Drive
  • 2.358 kg (5.2 lbs)

 

Build & Physical Features

 

I have to admit, not a fan of green on a notebook, but the well placed accents on the rubber pads beneath the notebook, on the speaker grill above, sides of the trackpad, and the keys themselves make the notebook stand out.

 

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The track pad was intuitive to use and features gesture and multi finger shortcuts, such as two finger scrolling and pinch to zoom. Left click can be activated by pressing down on the left bottom part of the keypad, and right click by moving to the bottom right section of the trackpad.

 

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Trying to open up the HP Power Pavilion notebook was no picnic. The sleek design of this notebook means it’s rather difficult to pry open and probably not meant to offer easy upgrades.  But upon doing so, the HP Power Pavilion notebook revealed a few surprises.  Beyond the standard high capacity HardDrive, and a dual fan configuration that pulls air from the bottom of the notebook with the exhaust directed out the back, I was surprised to find an empty M.2 connector to add a speedy SSD, and an empty DIMM slot to increase memory capacity beyond the default 8GB.  Even the large 70W/h battery was a pleasant find (and a good reason why the battery life was exceptional, even during heavy gaming).  The HP Pavilion Power notebook was silent for most workloads, and only spun up for heavy gaming. Even then, I’d say the system never got loud enough to be a bother and the skin temperature was always comfortable.

 

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This notebook features all essential ports, so no need to go shopping for a break out box.  That even includes an Ethernet port which has been a missing feature on a few new notebooks I’ve come across recently.

 

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Ports / Connections:

  • Power Connector
  • 4x USB 3.0 Type-A
  • MicroSD Slot
  • USB-C
  • Headphone output
  • HDMI
  • Network RJ45

 

All hardware is housed in an excellent solid chassis that can be carried in one hand.

 

DISPLAY

 

The HP Power Pavilion sports an decent IPS 1080p panel with anti-glare technology. Details are sharp and colors are perfect for everyday use and gaming.  Specs list the display just below 60% sRGB. If I had a choice at a checkout, I’d probably upgrade to the touch display which is about +$60.

 

Indoor

 

In a bright indoor office environment, we used 90 % brightness.  The anti-glare screen makes things a little darker so anything lower hits the whites rather quickly.  Even at 100% brightness, all of my testing showed incredible battery life.

 

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Outdoor

 

Using any notebook outdoors is not ideal.  With the HP Power Pavilion 15 notebook display output was still visible albeit with a lot less contrast.

 

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PERFORMANCE

 

Synthetic1

 

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Hard Drive2

 

CrystalDisk Mark was used to measure Hard Drive Performance:

 

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Boot Time

 

To measure the speed of this system I measured boot time from power up to the time my cursor no longer showed the spinning icon. My old work laptop with a HDD drive took over a minute to boot.

 

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Gaming

 

All tests were done on the latest driver and plugged into the wall. For all new laptops, we recommended updating to the latest driver for the best performance.

 

3DMark Time Spy3

 

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3dMark FireStrike4

 

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League of Legends5

 

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League of Legends ran amazing and stayed above 100 fps with all settings maxed out at 1080p. The IGP for some reason was considerably slower and never once reached 60fps, something the Radeon RX was consistently above in our testing.

 

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Overwatch6

 

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The Radeon RX 550 was absolutely needed to make Overwatch a playable gaming experience.  The HP Power Pavilion delivered consistent high framerates when at High settings, guaranteeing a great level of performance for this popular competitive game.  Something definitely looked odd disabling the integrated graphics, but the consistent performance of the Radeon RX 550 demonstrates solid performance in the HP Power Pavilion 15.

 

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Productivity7,8

 

Discrete Radeon RX 550 graphics feature 128-bit memory which will help performance in content creation related tasks.  Programs like Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Premiere leverage OpenCL to process a lot of work on the GPU itself.

 

As usual, we tested by running a sequence of filters and effect in Adobe Photoshop (2017). A 4K image (300 dpi) was rotated 180 degrees, crystalized by a factor of 10, blurred using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix, sharpened using the Smart Sharpen tool and rotated again by 180 degrees.

 

On Adobe Premiere, we tested with a 30 second 1080p mp4 video. A 30-second 1080p mp4 video clip was edited with a combination of scaling, sharpening (85), and lens distortion.

 

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BATTERY9

 

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The battery life on the HP Power Pavilion was strong thanks to its 70Wh battery.  Even though the system was sporting a 15 inch display, it easily lasts a typical working day for general usage. The 70 Wh battery powered the PCMark 8 Mainstream gaming test for almost 4 hours, while a competitive laptop with 940MX graphics ran out of power after 1.5 hours. Idling with the screen on at 90% a comfortable indoor brightness resulted in 11 hours of run time before the notebook auto shutdown.

 

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CONCLUSION

 

If you’re looking for a great performing stylish notebook, then the HP Power Pavilion delivers.  Well engineered, with a full 128-bit graphics card, room to upgrade, and a great price ($640US on hp.com at the time of this article), it’s hard not to consider this laptop to replace your old aging notebook.

 

Detailed Specs

Radeon RX 550 Graphics
Boost Clock1287 MHz
Peak Performance1.65 TFLOPs
Memory Size2 GB GDDR5
Memory width128 bit
Effective Memory Speed6 Gbps
Memory Bandwidth96 GB/s

 

 

Adam Kozak, Sr. Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Radeon™ RX 550, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.6.2. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Using the PCMark 10 extended benchmark, the laptop scored 3275 (Total), 5378 (Productivity), 4690 (Essentials), 3886 (Digital Content Creation), 2172 (Gaming). Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-140
  2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Radeon™ RX 550, Windows 10, Radeon Driver 17.6.2. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Using the Crystal DiskMark benchmark, the laptop scores were recorded for Seq Q32T1, 4K Q32T1, Seq, 4K. Read scores were 110.2 MB/s, .79 MB/s,,109.3 MB/s, 0.407 MB/s respectively.  Write scores were 100.1 MB/s, 0.216  MB/s, 24.33  MB/s, 0.1  MB/s respectively. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-141
  3. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Windows 10.   PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Using the 3DMark Time Spy benchmark, the Radeon™ RX 550 with Radeon Driver 17.6.2. scored 1287.  The internal graphics using HD 630 and driver 21.20.16.4599 scored 350. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-142
  4. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Windows 10.   PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Using the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark, the Radeon™ RX 550 with Radeon Driver 17.6.2. scored 3534.  The internal graphics using HD 630 and driver 21.20.16.4599 scored 779. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-143
  5. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Windows 10.   PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Playing League of Legends at 1920×1080 on High settings, the Radeon™ RX 550 with Radeon Driver 17.6.2. averaged 109 fps.  The internal graphics using HD 630 and driver 21.20.16.4599 averaged 9 fps. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-144
  6. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Windows 10.   PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Playing Overwatch at 1920×1080 on High settings, the Radeon™ RX 550 with Radeon Driver 17.6.2. averaged 102 fps.  The internal graphics using HD 630 and driver 21.20.16.4599 averaged 9 fps. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RX-145
  7. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Windows 10.   PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. When using the Adobe Photoshop (2017) program a 4K image (300 dpi) was rotated 180 degrees, crystalized by a factor of 10, blurred using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix, sharpened using the Smart Sharpen tool and rotated again by 180 degrees.  Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Windows 10.   PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. When using the Adobe Photoshop (2017) program a 4K image (300 dpi) was rotated 180 degrees, crystalized by a factor of 10, blurred using the Gaussian Blur tool by a factor of 1 pix, sharpened using the Smart Sharpen tool and rotated again by 180 degrees. Rendering the picture the Radeon™ RX 550 and Intel HD 630 IGP rendered the clip in 26 and 49 seconds respectively with Graphics Acceleration on and with OpenCL enabled. All times are an average of 3 test runs.  Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers.  RX-146
  8. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Windows 10.   PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. When using the Adobe Premier (2017) program a 30-second 1080p mp4 video clip was edited with a combination of scaling, sharpening (85), and lens distortion. Rendering the video on the Radeon™ RX 550 and Intel HD 630 IGP took 20 and 54 seconds respectively with Graphics Acceleration on and with OpenCL enabled. All times are an average of 3 test runs.  Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers.  RX-147
  9. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/11/2017 on the 2017 HP Power Pavilion Laptop, i5-7300HQ, Windows 10.  Acer Aspire F15 15.6”, Intel i7-7500U, Nvidia 940MX, Nvidia Driver 382.53, Windows 10.  PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. In the Idle battery test, screen 90% brightness, The HP Pavilion Power auto-shutdown after 666 minutes.  PCMark8 Battery test (Mainstream Gaming 1 and 2) resulted in battery life of 222 minutes for the HP Pavilion Power and 115 minutes for the Acer Aspire F15.  Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers.  RX-148

00.JPG

[Originally posted on 07/26/17.]

 

A key focus in PC gaming in recent years has been providing smooth, responsive gaming experiences. The goal has been to produce consistent and fluid animation in combination with minimal input lag—the shortest possible delay between pressing a key and seeing a response on-screen.

 

Since the beginning of PC graphics, one of the biggest problems on this front has been synchronization between the game’s animation and the display’s update rate. Most displays update themselves at a fixed rate, typically at 60Hz or 60 times per second, in fixed steps. Meanwhile, games and other 3D graphics applications can produce new frames of animation at different rates, and those frame rates tend to vary over time. Often, much of what we perceive as slowdowns or sluggishness when gaming involves poor interactions between these two timing loops.

 

In fact, on a 60Hz display, animation can look more uneven when a game is running at 40 FPS than at 30 FPS, because at 40 FPS, the display is updated in an elliptical pattern:

 

new-40FPS.png

*Game images from Quake Champions1

 

Versus a more even pattern at 30 FPS:

 

new-30FPS.png

*Game images from Quake Champions

 

You’re seeing a less pleasing pattern of animation, even though the GPU is cranking out frames at a higher rate, thanks to a timing sync issue between the game and the display.

 

We’ve come up with some outstanding technology to address this problem, most notably Radeon™ FreeSync technology for compatible monitors with variable refresh rates. I could talk about the theory all day, but you have to see FreeSync in action in order to appreciate it properly. Once you’ve experienced it, you won’t ever want to go back to gaming on a fixed-refresh display.

 

FreeSync as it stands now is excellent, but we can do even more to help owners of fixed- and variable-refresh displays alike. We’ve been working on this problem ahead of the Radeon™ Vega RX graphics launch, and the result is a new feature known as Enhanced Sync. Enhanced Sync is included in Radeon™ Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.7.2, and it’s supported on the upcoming Radeon RX Vega cards and on “Polaris”-based cards in the Radeon™ RX 400 and Radeon™ RX 500 series.

 

Enhanced Sync looks to tackle two different aspects of the GPU-display synchronization task, with the goal of providing a better combination of responsiveness and image quality.

 

The first problem it tackles is what happens when the game wants to run faster than the display’s refresh rate. It’s nice when your PC is able to produce frames faster than your monitor can display them, but dealing with that situation still involves compromises.

 

One way to handle this scenario is with traditional vsync, where the display is updated with a new, completed frame at each refresh interval. Doing so looks nice and generally produces smooth animation, but it also effectively caps the game’s frame rate at the speed of the display refresh. For instance, on a 60Hz display, you’d be limited to 60 FPS. For many games, that also means that user inputs are only sampled 60 times per second, because the speed of the game loop is tied to the frame rate.  As a result, traditional vsync can increase input lag and reduce responsiveness, which is why many gamers elect to disable vsync.

 

Trouble is, going without vsync has its own problems. Without vsync, the driver will flip to a new display buffer as soon as the GPU completes a frame—even if the display is in the middle of drawing that frame on the screen. This approach cuts input lag, but it also leads to a nasty artifact called tearing, where portions of two or more frames are shown on-screen at once, often with visible seams running horizontally across the display. At high frame rates, one may see portions of many different frames on the screen at once, seriously compromising image integrity.

 

04-Tearing.png

 

*Game images from Quake Champions

 

Enhanced Sync is a third approach to this problem. It lets the game run as fast as it wants without capping frame rates. With Enhanced Sync enabled, a game could in theory run at 240 FPS on a 60Hz display without issue. But Enhanced Sync doesn’t tear in this case. Instead, when it comes time for the monitor to draw a new frame, the most recently completed frame is displayed on the screen. Some older frames may be dropped if they are not needed. This approach maintains smooth animation, reduces tearing, and improves responsiveness by reducing input lag.

 

To get a sense of how well it works, we measured input lag for the two traditional vertical refresh sync modes (on and off) against Enhanced Sync in Overwatch using a high-speed camera. In this case, the GPU was able to run Overwatch at about 120 FPS unconstrained. These results show the amount of time that passes between a click and a response for each mode. As you can see, Enhanced Sync produces click-to-response times similar to vsync off—without compromising visual integrity by tearing2.

 

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So that’s the first problem Enhanced Sync addresses, and I think it’s a better solution than the traditional approaches to vsync.

 

The second problem Enhanced Sync addresses is at the other end of the performance spectrum: what happens when the game runs much slower than the display’s refresh rate? Low frame rates present a different sort of challenge.

 

With traditional vsync, if the system can’t produce a new frame in time for the monitor’s next refresh interval, then the old frame is repeated again, and we wait another entire interval before updating the screen. Those waits can add up. On a 60Hz display, if the system can’t get a frame out every interval, then it’s immediately limited to 30 FPS or even 20 FPS after that. Frame rates will move up and down in stair-step fashion, and we tend to perceive this effect as stutter or slowdowns (the technical term for this stair-step effect is quantization). Worse still, stepping down to such low frame rates increases input lag and compromises responsiveness.

 

Enhanced Sync deals with this problem by taking a dynamic approach. Generally, Enhanced Sync will stay synchronized to the display in order to avoid tearing. If the frame rate drops far enough below the display’s refresh rate, though, it will dynamically choose to allow tearing in order to get new information on screen as soon as possible and to avoid that stair-step effect. Enabling tearing is a compromise, but it’s arguably the best way of dealing with this difficult circumstance3.

 

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When Enhanced Sync does allow tearing, users should typically only see a single tearing “seam” on the screen at once, since the frame rate is low. And Enhanced Sync will automatically choose to stop allowing tearing once the game’s frame rate returns to a more comfortable level.

 

So Enhanced Sync improves on traditional vsync by combining two techniques. At high frame rates, it aims to provide a better mix of visual integrity and responsiveness. At lower frame rates, it uses a dynamic algorithm minimize both stuttering and input lag when the going gets tough.

 

At this point, you may be wondering how Enhanced Sync interacts with our FreeSync variable-refresh display technology. I’m happy to report that Enhanced Sync works alongside FreeSync to provide even better experiences.

 

Within the display’s FreeSync range, say 30Hz to 90Hz on some displays, FreeSync operates as usual. Frames are displayed when ready, at low latency, and with no tearing.

 

When the game’s frame rate exceeds the display’s peak refresh rate, Enhanced Sync works like it would with a fixed-refresh monitor in the same situation. The game is free to run as fast as it wants, uncapped, and the latest complete frame is displayed. If your monitor’s peak refresh rate is 90Hz, the game could still run at 120 FPS—without tearing, and with improved responsiveness versus traditional vsync at 90Hz.

 

At the other end of the spectrum, when the frame rate drops well below the FreeSync display’s minimum refresh rate, one of two things will happen.

 

On displays that support low frame-rate compensation (LFC), the FreeSync LFC algorithm kicks in to mitigate stutter without tearing. If LFC isn’t available, then Enhanced Sync will either sync or tear, depending on the application’s vsync settings.

 

I’m especially excited about the combination of Enhanced Sync and FreeSync with LFC. I think of it as a “best of all worlds” sync scenario, providing smooth animation at low latency with no tearing across the broadest possible range. FreeSync is already quite solid, but Enhanced Sync makes it even better.

 

Happily, Enhanced Sync is supported on all recent flavors of DirectX®, from 9 through 12, and it can be enabled in Radeon™ Settings under the vertical refresh sync drop-down menu. If you have a supported Radeon™ GPU, you can download the latest release of Radeon Software Crimson Edition and try it out for yourself. I think you’ll like it.

 

 

 

Scott Wasson, Sr. Manager, Technical Marketing for the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies, or opinions. Links to third party sites and references to third party trademarks are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

 

 

  1. Quake Champions logos and images © 2017 Bethesda Softworks LLC, a ZeniMax Media company. All Rights Reserved.
  2. Testing
  3. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of July 10, 2017 on the 8GB Radeon RX 580 with Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 17.7.2, on a test system comprising of Intel i7 7700K CPU (4.2 GHz), 16GB DDR4-3000 Mhz system memory, and Windows 10 x64 using the game Overwatch on the epic preset. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. At 3840X2160, Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver 17.7.2 and 8GB Radeon RX 580 with Enhanced Sync ON had a 4.2ms2 variance and vsync ON had a 50.4ms2 variance, which is 92% lower variance. All times an average of 3 test runs. Results are estimates and may vary. Performance may vary based on use of latest drivers. RS-151