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Precision Boost Overdrive (PBO) is a powerful new feature of the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ CPUs.1 Much like traditional overclocking, PBO is designed to improve multithreaded performance. But unlike traditional overclocking, Precision Boost Overdrive preserves all the automated intelligence built into a smart CPU like Ryzen: Precision Boost 2 remains enabled for on-demand performance, XFR 2 still enables higher performance with better cooling, and the CPU still lowers clocks and voltages to save power at idle. As you can see, Precision Boost Overdrive is sort of a “best of all worlds” approach to overclocking that manual mode usually doesn’t offer. But how does PBO work? Let’s find out in three easy steps.

 

Step 1: What Controls Boost

All 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen-branded Processors use Precision Boost 2, which intelligently leverages a large network of sensors built into the CPU to determine whether it’s okay to boost. These sensors measure and react in a very fast loop: up to 1000 times per second. Though there are many data points being measured, the most important are:

 

  • SoC Power (“PPT Limit”): measured in watts, the amount of power the CPU can draw before boost levels off
  • VRM Current (“TDC Limit”): measured in amps, the amount of current we let the motherboard deliver to the CPU before boost levels off
  • Temp (°C): measured in degrees Celsius, the temperature the CPU can reach before boost levels off

 

If the sensors detect that the CPU isn’t close to one of these limits, Precision Boost 2 sees opportunity to raise clockspeeds on as many cores as it can.

 

It is useful to imagine these three thresholds (“platform limits”) as a triangle, shown below, where the labeled corners are something like the RPM redline on your car. Inside of that, a safer and more reliable triangle that represents the factory configuration of your CPU.

 

Figure 1: Precision Boost 2 leverages extra thermal and electrical capacity to enable higher performance. The CPU’s factory configuration is aggressive, without pushing the CPU to the red line in power or temperatures.

 

 

Step 2: More Room to Play

If the size of the imaginary triangle largely determines whether or not the CPU can boost, what if the triangle were simply larger? In the previous diagram, you may have noticed that there’s some empty space between the factory CPU configuration and the platform limits. That empty space is what users are filling up when they overclock their CPU, and it’s the same space the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPU consumes when PBO is enabled. Let’s see how that new triangle might look!

 

Figure 2: Precision Boost Overdrive gives Precision Boost 2 more "room to play" before pulling back on boost. More cores, more frequency, more often!

 

 

As you can see, the PPT and TDC Limits have been embiggened to let the platform draw more power. That extra power is directly converted into higher average clockspeeds on more cores for a longer period of time. PBO even communicates with your motherboard to understand how much extra VRM current capacity (TDC) it can provide!

 

Step 3: The Benefits of Precision Boost Overdrive

By now we know that Precision Boost Overdrive unleashes a more aggressive version of Precision Boost 2 that preserves the smart frequency and voltage management that users like. The performance upside for PBO can be significant: up to 13% more multithread performance!2 That’s not dissimilar to what a user might gain with manual overclocking, but PBO can accomplish it at the touch of a button in the latest version of AMD Ryzen™ Master.

 

 

Precision Boost Overdrive: A Smarter Way to Overclock

Taking your feedback seriously is a critical objective for us, as is using the Ryzen CPU's intelligence in new and beneficial ways. We knew we could bring those two goals together with Precision Boost Overdrive! The result is awesome: a new type of overclocking that combines smart boost control, idle power savings, factory max boost clock, and higher nT performance. We hope you enjoy!

 


Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

Footnotes:

1. Precision Boost Overdrive requires a 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper processor with AMD X399 chipset motherboard. Because Precision Boost Overdrive enables operation of the processor outside of specifications and in excess of factory settings, use of the feature invalidates the AMD product warranty and may also void warranties offered by the system manufacturer or retailer. GD-128

2. Testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/16/2018. “Multithread performance” defined as Cinebench R15 nT. Results presented in order of Precision Boost Overdrive OFF vs. ON: 5096 vs. 5795 (%13 faster). AMD System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2990WX, Enermax 360 CLC @ 20°C ambient temperature, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), Asus Zenith X399 Extreme (BIOS 0008), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD. Results may vary with system configuration. Precision Boost Overdrive requires a 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper processor with AMD X399 chipset motherboard. Because Precision Boost Overdrive enables operation of the processor outside of specifications and in excess of factory settings, use of the feature invalidates the AMD product warranty and may also void warranties offered by the system manufacturer or retailer. 

From the beginning, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor was designed for the world’s fastest and most premium desktop systems. But it also started small: a small skunkworks team of enthusiasts at AMD believed that the users of such systems needed and wanted more than an 8-core AMD Ryzen CPU. The rest is legend. The pace of progress for AMD—and the HEDT market—since that little idea has been breathtaking.

 

Where 10 cores once cost $1723 USD (Core i7-6950X), the 1st Gen Ryzen Threadripper CPU delivered 16 cores at half the cost (a 2.5X price/perf leap in one generation).1  It was also the world’s first 16-core HEDT processor, and we challenged our competitor to step it up. Where PCIe® lanes once pointlessly varied with the CPU in the socket, Threadripper made an always-on 64 lanes table stakes. All of that fed into phenomenal acclaim: Ryzen and Threadripper collected 550+ industry awards and accolades.

 

Now it’s time for the best HEDT CPU to have a sequel: the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processor. It’s the biggest, heaviest, fastest desktop processor 2018 technology can build.2,3,4  And today you can learn about two exciting new models:

 

 

Threadripper X Series Processors & Customers

Dovetailing off last year’s success in the 16-core market, the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X is the crucial “missing link” for customers who create by day and game by night. With 16 cores and 32 threads, plus new technologies like Precision Boost 2 and AMD StoreMI technology, Threadripper X Series CPUs stand strong in gaming while flying through creative workloads up to 41% faster than the competition.5

 

Threadripper WX Series Processors & Customers

New for 2018: Some customers want to double down on their content creation performance to tear through their work as quickly as state-of-the-art technology will allow. Time is money, after all. Those users are Threadripper WX Series customers. Whether it’s 3D rendering, media encoding, or cinema mastering, the first-of-its-kind 64-thread architecture of the Threadripper WX Series is a specialized weapon that makes even the biggest projects seem smaller than ever. In fact, it’s up to 51% faster than its more expensive competitor!6

 

Together, the 2018 Ryzen Threadripper X and WX Series CPUs set the standard for performance, flexibility, features, and value for gamers and creators shopping in the HEDT market. And lest I forget: they’re drop-in compatible with any AMD X399 motherboard, tapping into an awesome ecosystem of great hardware. That’s HEDT done right!

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX

TDP180W250W
Core Count16 Cores, 32 Threads32 Cores, 64 Threads
Topology8 Cores ea. in Dies 0,18 Cores ea. in Dies 0,1,2,3
L2 Cache512K Per Core (8MB Total)512K Per Core (16MB Total)
L3 Cache16MB Per Die (32MB Total)16MB Per Die (64MB Total)
Base Frequency3.5GHz3.0GHz
Boost Frequency4.4GHz4.2GHz
PCIe Gen3 Lanes64 (4x reserved for chipset)64 (4x reserved for chipset)
Memory ChannelsQuadQuad
Extended Frequency Range 2 (XFR2)EnabledEnabled
Precision Boost 2EnabledEnabled
Precision Boost Overdrive (OC)7AvailableAvailable
Transistor Count~9.6 Billion~19.2 Billion
Die Size(s)2x 213mm24x 213mm2
AMD Suggested Online Price$899 USD$1799 USD

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

Footnotes:

1. Testing by AMD performance labs as of June 27, 2018. Performance per dollar evaluated by dividing the Cinebench R15 nT multithread score by the $USD SEP of the processor. I7-6950X: 2061/$1723 = 1.2 per $ (100% baseline). 1950X: 3042/$999 =  3.0 per $ (150% or 2.5X faster). Intel pricing via ark.intel.com as of 7/24/2018. Intel results obtained from official Cinebench R15 benchmark database on 7/24/2018, results not verified by AMD: https://us.rebusfarm.net/en/tempbench?view=benchmark / https://us.rebusfarm.net/images/benchmarks/1466540143_438.jpg. AMD System Configuration: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X, Asus ROG Zenith X399, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Samsung 960 EVO SSD, Windows 10 x64 RS3. Results may vary with system configuration and drivers. RPM-24

2. AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors are AMD’s largest desktop processors, with external dimensions of 3.1”x 2.2” x 0.25”. Intel’s largest desktop processors, the Core i9 series, have external dimensions of 2.1” x 1.8” x 0.2”, smaller than the AMD Ryzen Threadripper in every dimension. FP2-4

3. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 6/26/2018 on the following system. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used. Test configuration: AMD ‘Whitehaven’ X399 Socket sTR4 Motherboard + AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2990WX + Gigabyte X299 AORUS Gasming9 + Core i9-7980XE. Both systems feature GeForce GTX 1080 (driver 24.21.13.9793), 4x8GB DDR4-3200, Windows 10 x64 Pro (RS3), Samsung 850 Pro SSD. "Power” defined as computational processing power as represented by the Cinebench R15 processor benchmark The Core i9-7980XE achieved an average of 3335.2 points in the benchmark, while the Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX achieved an average of 5099.3, or (5099.3/3335.2=153%) 53% faster than the Intel Core i9-7980XE. RP2-1.

4. AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors are AMD’s heaviest desktop processors, with a weight of 136 grams. Intel’s heaviest desktop processors, the Core i9 series, weigh 52 grams., which is lighter than the AMD Ryzen Threadripper. FP2-5

5. Performance testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/16/2018. “Multithread” performance defined as Cinebench R15 nT. “Single thread” performance defined as Cinebench R15 1T. Cinebench R15 nT Results: 7900X vs. 2950X: 2183 vs. 3092 (+41% faster); 7900X vs. 1950X: 2183 vs. 3022 (38% faster); 1950X vs. 2950X: 3022 vs. 3092 (1.6% faster). Cinebench R15 1T results: 7900X vs. 2950X: 188 vs. 177 (5.8% slower); 7900X vs. 1950X: 188 vs. 167 (11% slower); 1950X vs. 2950X: 167 vs. 177 (6% faster). AMD System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2950X and 1950X, Corsair H100i CLC, 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), Asus Zenith X399 Extreme (BIOS 0008), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD. Intel System Configuration: Core i9-7900X, Asus PRIME X299-Deluxe (BIOS 1401), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD. Results may vary with system configuration and drivers. RP2-6

6. Performance testing conducted by AMD Performance Labs as of 7/16/2018. “Multithread” performance defined as Cinebench R15 nT. “Single thread” performance defined as Cinebench R15 1T. Cinebench R15 nT Results: 7980XE vs. 2990WX: 3365 vs. 5089 (51% faster). Cinebench R15 1T results: 7980XE vs. 2990WX: 183 vs. 175 (4.3% slower). AMD System configuration: AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ 2990WX, Corsair H100i CLC, 4x16GB DDR4-2667 (16-18-18), Asus Zenith X399 Extreme (BIOS 0008), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD.  =Intel System Configuration: Core i9-7980XE, Asus PRIME X299-Deluxe (BIOS 1401), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-28-1T), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 398.36), Windows® 10 x64 1803, Samsung 850 Pro SSD, Western Digital Black 2TB HDD. Results may vary with system configuration and drivers. RP2-9

7. Precision Boost Overdrive requires a 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper processor with AMD X399 chipset motherboard. Because Precision Boost Overdrive enables operation of the processor outside of specifications and in excess of factory settings, use of the feature invalidates the AMD product warranty and may also void warranties offered by the system manufacturer or retailer. GD-128

Whatever your digital creation is, be it a 3D model, 4K video or animation, we all know that impatient feeling waiting to see the results of your creative design. The 2nd Gen Ryzen™ Threadripper processors enable blazing fast renders, exports and encodes. With up to 32 cores and 64 threads, the 2nd Gen Ryzen Threadripper is a beast for digital content creators that saves you time.

 

The 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper processors improve upon the 1st generation counterparts with higher clocks speeds (thanks to the new 12nm process and “Zen+” architecture) and improved boost technologies (with XFR2 and Precision Boost 2 technology) for better performance with your favorite content creation applications.

 

Looking at the 1st Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X CPU (16-core) vs. the 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2950X CPU (16-core) you’ll see performance gains across a variety of 3D rendering, video editing and graphic design applications.

 

Slide1.JPG

See footnote #1 for complete test configuration

 

For even more performance the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX processor pushes HEDT systems to the next level with 32 cores and 64 threads of processing power. That’s an extra 14 cores over the comparable Intel i9 7980XE CPU, which helps you complete your work faster and still have processing power left over to multi-task on the same machine.

 

Slide2.JPGSee footnote #2 for complete test configuration

 

 

And there you have it. Whether you’re editing videos, creating animations, or designing 3D models, the new 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPUs are here to help save you time and get your work done faster.

 

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David Tjong, Product Marketing Manager for AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied. GD-5

 

“Zen” is a codename only and not an AMD product name.

1. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 07/15/2018. Workstation PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on different driver versions used. System Configurations:  All systems equipped with 64 GB quad-channel DDR4 2666 MHz (4x16), Samsung M.2 NVME 960PRO 500GB SSD, Windows 10 RS4 operating system and Radeon Pro WX7100 graphics adapters with driver version 24.20.11001.1 AMD Threadripper 2950X: MSI MEG Motherboard; AMD Threadripper 1950X- Gigabyte Aorus Gaming 7.; Results ordered in AMD Threadripper 2950X vs. AMD Threadripper 1950X: ChaosGroup VRay benchmark v3.57 (V-Ray rendering): 43 sec vs. 47.6 for (1/43) / (1/47.6) =  1.10 or 10% faster; Adobe Dimension design software: 199 sec vs. 218.7 for (1/173) / (1/199) =  1.098 or 10% faster; Adobe Premiere encoding time exporting: 368 sec vs. 461 for (1/368) / (1/461) = 1.25 or 25% faster; BlackMagic Design Davinci Resolve 15.0b5: 43.3 sec vs. 46.3 for (1/43.3) / (1/46.3) = 1.069 or 7% faster; SPECwpc™ V2.1 benchmark under official run settings; subtest estimate score for Maya used to show performance of Autodesk® Maya® computer animation software. Score: 14.6 vs. 12.2 for 14.6/12.2 = 1.195 or 20% more; SPECwpc™V2.1 is a trademark of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). Additional information about the SPEC benchmarks can be found at www.spec.org/gwpg

 

2. Testing by AMD Performance labs as of 07/15/2018. Workstation PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on different driver versions used. System Configurations:  All systems equipped with 64 GB quad-channel DDR4 2666 MHz (4x16), Samsung M.2 NVME 960PRO 500GB SSD, Windows 10 RS4 operating system and Radeon Pro WX7100 graphics adapters with driver version 24.20.11001.1 AMD Threadripper 2990WX: MSI MEG Motherboard; Intel Core i7-7980XE, MSI Raider X299 motherboard; Results ordered in Intel Core i9-7980XE vs. AMD Threadripper 2990WX: ChaosGroup VRay benchmark v3.57 (V-Ray rendering): 38 sec vs. 26 sec for (1/26) / (1/38) =  1.46 or 46% faster; Adobe Dimension design software: 206 sec vs. 173 sec for (1/173) / (1/206) =  1.19 or 19% faster; Adobe Premiere encoding time exporting: 438 sec vs. 434 sec for (1/434) / (1/438) = 1.01 or 1% faster; BlackMagic Design Davinci Resolve 15.0b5: 43.7 sec vs. 34.0 sec for (1/34) / (1/43.7) =  1.28 or 28% faster; SPECwpc™ V2.1 benchmark under official run settings; subtest estimate score for Maya used to show performance of Autodesk® Maya® computer animation software. Score: 16.2 vs. 16.0 for 16.0/16.2 = .99 or -1% more; SPECwpc™V2.1 is a trademark of the Standard Performance Evaluation Corporation (SPEC). Additional information about the SPEC benchmarks can be found at www.spec.org/gwpg

ChinaJoy_2.jpg

*UPDATE 8/3/18 to clarify it is the GDDR5 memory controller that is on the chip.

 

As the #1 supplier of high-end processors and graphics to the gaming market, we are focused on how we can deliver products that power the ultimate gaming experiences. Today, we are excited to detail how we are bringing Ryzen processors and Radeon graphics to even more gamers through our work with Zhongshan Subor to create a new gaming PC and upcoming console for the China market. The PC and console are powered by a semi-custom “Zen” and “Vega”-based AMD SOC. The high-performance AMD chip combines an AMD Ryzen™ CPU (4 core/8 thread running at 3Ghz) with AMD Radeon™ Vega Graphics (24CUs running at 1.3Ghzs), and 256-bit GDDR5 interface onto a single chip and 8GB of GDDR5 on the motherboard.

 

The new gaming SOC is the latest example of how only AMD can combine high-performance CPU and GPU technologies to give gamers the most immersive experiences possible. Whether it is our Radeon FreeSync technology, which is the industry’s broadest adopted technology for tear-free, smooth and open gameplay or our feature-packed Radeon Software Adrenalin Edition software, AMD puts gamers at the heart of our technology development. We are also committed  to working across the developer community and with leading publishers such as Ubisoft to drive adoption of next-generation technologies like Rapid Packed Math that can deliver more realistic and immersive experiences. Not to mention our work as we equip the world’s most competitive eSports teams like Fnatic with powerful AMD Ryzen and AMD Vega gaming processors. 

 

The new gaming PC was demonstrated in the Subor booth at ChinaJoy, the largest gaming and digital entertainment exhibition in China and Asia. Subor plans to launch their new game PC in late-August. The SUBOR gaming console, featuring the same hardware as the gaming PC but with a customized operating system, is expected to launch by the end of 2018. 

 

Designing a semi-custom gaming SOC for Subor represents an exciting opportunity for AMD to make our high-performance technologies even more accessible to gamers in China. The new SOC is also a great example of our semi-custom strategy, where we take our differentiated IP and tailor to meet the specific needs of a customer to create a product only AMD can deliver.

 

We look forward to continuing to push the boundaries in game graphics and compute performance