Proverb: “Time is money.”

 

Few know this more acutely than the creator, whose compile or render times could take hours, days… or even weeks. Every minute spent watching a progress bar is another minute—another dollar—squandered. 3D artists, video editors, and software developers know this problem especially well. But those creators also know that a powerful CPU can claw back those precious minutes to get things done. And when it comes to chips that laugh in the face of sluggish progress bars, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor is the definitive choice.

 

 


See footnote for raw scores and system configuration.

 

And there’s the picture to prove it. If your job or hobby depends on creative workloads like physically-based rendering, raytracing, or video editing, then a Threadripper CPU is easily your best defense against the pokey progress bars that cost you time and money.

 

It’s that simple.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


 

Footnote:

Testing conducted by AMD performance labs as of 7/31/2017. System configurations: 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399 (AMD), ASUS ROG STRIX X299-E (Intel), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 385.12), Thermaltake Water 3.0 Riing RGB 280, Windows® 10 x64 Creator’s Update. Raw scores (7900X vs. 1920X vs. 1950X): POV-Ray [4565,4845,5971]; Adobe Premiere Pro CC [9m06s,9m34s,7m48s] with 4K60 to YouTube 2160p preset (lower is better); Handbrake [6m55s,6m35s,5m43s] with 4K30 to 1080p AppleTV3 preset (lower is better); 7-Zip [57893,59899,73444]; VeraCrypt 50MB AES [15.6,18.5,24.2]; Corona Photorealism [90 sec,89 sec,71 sec] (lower is better). All tests an average of five runs.