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By now, many enthusiasts know the story of AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors: powerful creative performance, smooth gaming, and an uncompromising platform with tons of ports and lanes. The award-winning Threadripper 1950X and Threadripper 1920X CPUs proved that AMD is serious about HEDT performance, and that disrupting the status quo still matters in the most elite PC segment.

 

However, it’s a basic economic truth that not every creative user is able to spend up to $999 on a powerful processor. That does not diminish their appetite for a full complement of PCI Express® lanes, or quad-channel memory, or a feature-rich motherboard. But it did get us thinking about how to make that goodness more accessible, and we built the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X processor to answer the call. It’s available starting today with a manufacturer-recommended price of $549 USD!

 

About the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X CPU

“Just choose a core count” has been our mantra summarizing the consistent feature set of the Threadripper family, and that extends to the Threadripper 1900X, which has a lot in common with its big brothers: boost clocks up to 4.0GHz, Extended Frequency Range (XFR) clocks up to 4.2GHz, quad channel DRAM support, 64 PCIe® lanes, and a 180W TDP. In fact, you can count the differences on one hand:

 

  • The Threadripper 1900X has a higher base clock at 3.8GHz
  • There’s 20MB of L2+L3 cache
  • It has 8 cores and 16 threads

 

AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900XAMD Ryzen Threadripper 1920XAMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X
Cores/Threads

8/16

12/2416/32
CCX Configuration4+0 (Die0) / 4+0 (Die1)3+3 (Die0) / 3+3 (Die1)4+4 (Die0) / 4+4 (Die1)
L2 Cache Configuration512K per core (4MB total)512K per core (6MB total)512K per core (8MB total)
L3 Cache Configuration8MB per die (16MB total)16MB per die (32MB total)16MB per die (32MB total)
Base Frequency3.8GHz3.5GHz3.4GHz
All Cores Boost FrequencyUp to 3.9GHzUp to 3.7GHzUp to 3.7GHz
Boost FrequencyUp to 4.0GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.0GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.0GHz (4 cores)
XFR FrequencyUp to 4.2GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.2GHz (4 cores)Up to 4.2GHz (4 cores)
PCIe® Gen3 Lanes646464
DDR Channels444
ECC SupportYesYesYes
TDP180W180W180W

 

The Threadripper 1900X for Content Creators

During the launch of the AMD Ryzen™ 7 1800X processor in March, we were pleased to see how digital content creators (DCC) especially took to an 8-core CPU as the new normal. But we did hear feedback from some that more lanes and more memory channels would be the perfect complement to that kind of CPU. We could only smile coyly at the time, knowing that one day the Threadripper 1900X would exist to answer those needs to a T.  And here we are!

 

The Ryzen Threadripper 1900X processor represents a tip of the scales towards the DCC side, enabling new performance upside and scalability over our most powerful CPU in the mainstream AMD AM4 Platform. For example: anyone with a thirst for GPU acceleration—Blender cycles or V-Ray, anybody? —can pack up to seven PCIe x8 accelerators into the Threadripper platform! That kind of expansion just can’t be found in any other HEDT platform today.

 

See footnote #1 for complete test configuration.

 

The Threadripper 1900X for Gaming

When work is done and it’s time to play, the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1900X packs a punch in the gaming department. In fact, it’s in the ballpark with the 8-core AMD Ryzen 7 processors, which are still winning awards for their excellent gaming performance. Naturally, we still recommend an AMD Ryzen 7/5/3 processor for anyone that just wants to game, but the Threadripper 1900X comfortably holds its own when it’s time to win some chicken dinners after a hard day’s work.

 

See footnote #2 for complete test configuration.

 

The “Threadripper Experience”

At AMD, we put a lot of thought into what it means to own an ultra-high-end PC platform, and made it our mission to cram all that goodness into AMD Ryzen Threadripper processor and the AMD X399 Chipset:

 

  • Powerful multi-threaded creative performance beyond the AMD Ryzen 7 1800X
  • A fully-featured chipset (e.g. 60 usable PCIe® lanes)
  • Quad-channel DDR4 infrastructure
  • ECC memory support up to 512GB per DIMM slot
  • Smooth and comfortable gaming at the important 60/120/144Hz thresholds
  • A soldered heatspreader with an indium alloy TIM for optimal heat exchange to your cooler
  • Top-5% die selection for higher clockspeeds at lower voltages
  • Unlocked voltage and multipliers for overclocking3
  • Premium motherboards with 10-layer PCBs, robust VRMs, and extensive I/O
  • A diverse selection of coolers designed for Threadripper
  • Can we brag? Have you seen the packaging?

 

For creators who game, and gamers who create, it’s hard to do any better than that. And starting today at $549 USD SEP with the new Threadripper 1900X model, the uncompromising Threadripper platform has never been more accessible.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


 

Footnotes:

1. Testing by AMD performance labs as of 8/22/2017. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith X399 (1900X), Asus Crosshair VI Hero (1800X), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1900X), 2x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1800X), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 384.94), Windows® 10 RS2, AMD Ryzen™ Balanced Power Plan. Raw Scores (1900X vs. 1800X): Cinebench R15 (1743 vs. 1646), Handbrake (8m44s vs. 9m09s) lower is better, POV-Ray (3550 vs. 3404), Blender (50m vs. 49m30s) lower is better, 7-Zip (44186 vs. 43539), VeraCrypt 1GB AES (14.7 vs. 13.6), Adobe Premiere Pro CC (12m19s vs. 12m17s) lower is better. Performance may vary with latest drivers. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. RZN-75

2. Testing by AMD performance labs as of 8/22/2017. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith X399 (1900X), Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming5 (1800X), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1900X), 2x8GB DDR4-3200 @ 14-14-14-36 (1800X), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 384.94), Windows® 10 RS2, AMD Ryzen™ Balanced Power Plan. Testing results are an average of 5 runs. Performance may vary with latest drivers. PC manufacturers may vary configurations, yielding different results. Performance may vary based on the graphics card.

3. WARNING: AMD processors, including chipsets, CPUs, APUs and GPUs (collectively and individually “AMD processor”), are intended to be operated only within their associated specifications and factory settings. Operating your AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings, including but not limited to the conducting of overclocking (including use of this overclocking software, even if such software has been directly or indirectly provided by AMD or an entity otherwise affiliated in any way with AMD), may damage your processor, affect the operation of your processor or the security features therein and/or lead to other problems, including but not limited to damage to your system components (including your motherboard and components thereon (e.g., memory)), system instabilities (e.g., data loss and corrupted images), reduction in system performance, shortened processor, system component and/or system life, and in extreme cases, total system failure. It is recommended that you save any important data before using the tool.  AMD does not provide support or service for issues or damages related to use of an AMD processor outside of official AMD specifications or outside of factory settings. You may also not receive support or service from your board or system manufacturer. Please make sure you have saved all important data before using this overclocking software. DAMAGES CAUSED BY USE OF YOUR AMD PROCESSOR OUTSIDE OF OFFICIAL AMD SPECIFICATIONS OR OUTSIDE OF FACTORY SETTINGS ARE NOT COVERED UNDER ANY AMD PRODUCT WARRANTY AND MAY NOT BE COVERED BY YOUR BOARD OR SYSTEM MANUFACTURER’S WARRANTY.

When creators with the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ CPU are done designing the world around us, it’s only natural that they’d want to kick back and play some games. Today I wanted to give you a brief look at what to expect with the 2560x1440 resolution that has proven so popular in this high-end segment.

 

Testing by AMD labs as of 7/27/2017. All results an average of five runs using “high” graphics presets. System configuration: ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399 (BIOS 0303), 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti, Windows® 10 x64 Creator’s Update, Ryzen Balanced Performance Plan.

 

A picture says a thousand words: the Threadripper platform effortlessly transitions into making quick work of graphically demanding games. In the workloads we tested, we saw average framerates around 60, 120, and 144 FPS, depending on the title. That’s a great experience for today’s 1440p displays!

 

Seeing this level of performance on graphically challenging games makes me happy, because I know that represents plenty of horsepower for games like CS:GO and Rocket League where raw framerates are king.

 

Introducing Game Mode

Making a hugely multi-core CPU that’s ready for gaming is a challenging effort, because most PC games are designed for the typical 4-8 core processor. When greater core counts enter the picture, things can get squirrelly: poor thread scheduling can reduce performance, or (more rarely) the game may simply not run at all. The Threadripper team at AMD spent a long time thinking about how we can help our customers avoid these scenarios altogether, and we call it Game Mode.

 

Game Mode is a new feature in AMD Ryzen™ Master  that reconfigures the platform in two key ways:

  • It temporarily disables half of the CPU cores, which turns the AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X into an 8C16T device (like the AMD Ryzen™ 1800X) and the 1920X into a 6C12T device (like the AMD Ryzen™ 1600X). For the truly technical, this is a 4+4 CCX configuration on one die. This ensures the game encounters the number of cores it was truly designed to handle. Please note that Game Mode does not disable SMT.
  • We tell the OS to use a Local Mode (NUMA) memory, which keeps a game and its memory footprint inside one CPU die and the locally-connected DRAM. This minimizes several key latency points in the system, which most games love.

 

Together, these changes can make a big difference for the games that weren’t designed with a beastly 12-core or 16-core processor in mind! When you’re ready for heavy threaded workloads, switching back to “Creator Mode” in AMD Ryzen Master effortlessly reverts these changes.

 

See footnote.

 

Game On

From the beginning, we envisioned the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platform as a do-it-all powerhouse built for the enthusiasts with demanding workloads that span work and play. With the powerful “Zen” architecture, tons of compute, and AMD Ryzen Master to optimize gaming performance, we think we got the recipe right for these users. We can’t wait to see what you do with Threadripper!

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


FOOTNOTES:

Testing by AMD Performance labs as of July 22, 2017 on the following systems. PC manufacturers may vary configurations yielding different results. Results may vary based on driver versions used.

 

System Configurations: AMD Ryzen Threadripper 1950X processors on an ASUS ROG X399 Zenith Extreme motherboard. All systems equipped with 32GB (4 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 RAM, Samsung 850 PRO 512GB SSD, Windows 10 RS2 operating system, Geforce TX 1080 Ti graphics adapter, Graphics driver 384.76 :: 7/22/2017.

 

The Threadripper 1950X achieved average frame rates as follows in the following games at 1080p: In Gears of War Ultimate High (DX12), an average frame rate of 104.8 in default UMA mode and 121.11 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (121.11/104.8=1.14 or 14%) in legacy game mode; In Fallout 4 (Ultra), an average frame rate of 60.08 in default UMA mode and 72.29 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (72.29/60.08=1.17 or 17%) in legacy game mode; In Hitman Absolution (Ultra), an average frame rate of 76.54 in default UMA mode and 84.92 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (84.92/76.54=1.10 or 10%) in legacy game mode.  In Call of Duty: Modern Warfare an average frame rate of 91.27 in default UMA mode and 146.25 in Legacy Game Mode, resulting in an improvement of (91.27/146.25=1.38 or 38%) in legacy game mode.

 

On average, with a sampling of over 60 actual games and settings as detailed in 1950X_LGM_vs_Mission.xlxs, performance uplift with Legacy Game Mode enabled is about 5% over Creator Mode. RZN-70

When I was a young lad, the first PC I ever built with my own money used the sensational 1GHz “Thunderbird” AMD Athlon™, ASUS A7V motherboard, and a GeForce 2 GTS. It was funded with my little paper route delivering the Tribune newspaper in Royal Oak, MI. My family had played PC games since the 486 era, but that system felt like an ascension to something truly special. Through it, I fell in love with the hardware, rather than just using the hardware. Ten years later, chance would have it that I’d come full circle to begin work at AMD.

 

I’ve been a PC enthusiast for a long time, and there are few things I love more than a great new piece of hardware that stands heads and shoulders above its peers. I think most enthusiasts know that feeling. There’s just something exciting about looking at “the best,” plus it’s fun to marvel at a giant leap forward within one generation of hardware. And though I am certainly biased, that’s how I feel about the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ platform with the new AMD X399 chipset.

 

The exhaustiveness of it all just makes me giddy:

  • 64 PCI Express® lanes
  • Quad-channel DDR4
  • Up to 2 native USB 3.1 Gen2 ports
  • Up to 14 USB 3.1 Gen1 ports
  • Up to 6 USB 2.0 ports
  • Up to 16 SATA ports

 

That is a lot of connectivity. In fact, it’s enough for me to comfortably run quad GPU, 3TB of NVMe storage, every USB device in my house, every SATA drive I’ve ever owned… and still have room to spare.

 

ASRock X399 MotherboardASUS MotherboardGigabyte X399 Motherboard ImageMSI X399 Motherboard

ASRock X399 Taichi

ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme

GIGABYTE X399 AORUS Gaming 7

MSI X399 Gaming Pro Carbon AC

 

Motherboards with the AMD X399 chipset are just beautiful, too: premium materials, great cooling, nice layouts, high-end controllers, LED readouts, exhaustive BIOSes, and lots of headers for fans and RGB. Precisely what I want out of a motherboard!

 

And unlike the other guy, the AMD X399 doesn’t have a confusing matrix of lanes, ports, and memory channels that go dark if you buy the wrong CPU. You always get the same connectivity with AMD X399, regardless of what Threadripper CPU you buy. That’s what enthusiasts deserve when committing to an HEDT platform.

 

There are often times in this industry when “best” is a nebulous decision filled with what-ifs and “well, it depends.” It sure didn’t feel that way with my “Thunderbird” Athlon, and it’s hard not to feel the same way about X399 today. When it comes to ultimate PC platforms, nothing else comes close.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

Proverb: “Time is money.”

 

Few know this more acutely than the creator, whose compile or render times could take hours, days… or even weeks. Every minute spent watching a progress bar is another minute—another dollar—squandered. 3D artists, video editors, and software developers know this problem especially well. But those creators also know that a powerful CPU can claw back those precious minutes to get things done. And when it comes to chips that laugh in the face of sluggish progress bars, the AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processor is the definitive choice.

 

 


See footnote for raw scores and system configuration.

 

And there’s the picture to prove it. If your job or hobby depends on creative workloads like physically-based rendering, raytracing, or video editing, then a Threadripper CPU is easily your best defense against the pokey progress bars that cost you time and money.

 

It’s that simple.

 

Robert Hallock is a technical marketing guy for AMD's CPU division. His/her postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 


 

Footnote:

Testing conducted by AMD performance labs as of 7/31/2017. System configurations: 4x8GB DDR4-3200 (14-14-14-36), ASUS ROG Zenith Extreme X399 (AMD), ASUS ROG STRIX X299-E (Intel), GeForce GTX 1080 Ti (driver 385.12), Thermaltake Water 3.0 Riing RGB 280, Windows® 10 x64 Creator’s Update. Raw scores (7900X vs. 1920X vs. 1950X): POV-Ray [4565,4845,5971]; Adobe Premiere Pro CC [9m06s,9m34s,7m48s] with 4K60 to YouTube 2160p preset (lower is better); Handbrake [6m55s,6m35s,5m43s] with 4K30 to 1080p AppleTV3 preset (lower is better); 7-Zip [57893,59899,73444]; VeraCrypt 50MB AES [15.6,18.5,24.2]; Corona Photorealism [90 sec,89 sec,71 sec] (lower is better). All tests an average of five runs.

Hey, everyone! Preorders for the crazy powerful AMD Ryzen™ Threadripper™ processors went live on July 31, and those with a CPU on the way may be wondering what cooler to buy for the 4094-pin sTR4 socket on the AMD X399 motherboards. Well, my friends, wonder no longer!

 

It's super simple: included with every AMD Ryzen Threadripper CPU is a free mounting bracket that enables compatibility with a wide range of premium closed-loop liquid cooling (CLC) solutions. These beautiful CLCs will keep your new Threadripper chip nice and chilly, and we maintain a list of over 20 solutions that are compatible with the included bracket. We'll be updating the list regularly for you!

 

There are also cooling solutions on the way that do not use AMD's provided bracket, and those will be added to the official list over time as well. Before purchasing such a solution, verify with the manufacturer or retailer that the cooler includes out-of-box sTR4 support. Some coolers pre-date the Ryzen Threadripper CPU, and are receiving mid-production updates after a certain date to include the compatible mounting hardware.

 


 

UPDATE NOTICE: The contents of this blog update have been migrated to the official Threadripper thermal solutions page on AMD.com at 3:47 PM Central on 2 August, 2017.