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15 Posts authored by: lawrence.latif Employee

david_merced.jpgDavid Merced, Sr. Channel Account Manager, AMD

 

What should organizations considering new servers keep in mind to get what they need? Is there value in choosing the latest and greatest?

You know that fact about how most of us only use a small percentage of our brains at a time? The same tends to happen with servers.

 

Many companies don’t require maximum compute power to manage their data and applications. Most of our customers are not doing complex genome mapping or analyzing fluid dynamics; they are running email, cloud, database, and business applications workloads. These same customers need a highly-capable, enterprise-grade server to power their businesses with enough extra juice to handle the highs and power efficiency to manage the lows.

 

Most servers don’t operate at full capacity. I’ve even seen some studies that found server utilization as low as 4%. It’s like driving an exotic sports car when a compact does the trick.

 

The enterprise-grade AMD-based HPE ProLiant DL385 server is the ideal option for budget-minded customers because it delivers the performance they need at the price they want and includes extra room for growth.

 

How far ahead are organizations planning when considering new servers? How far ahead should they be planning?

It depends on the organization and its needs. Smaller to mid-size customer timeframes are usually a little shorter due to the fact that they need to be nimble because these customers are constantly trying to grow. But planning sessions for companies like major online social sites or e-tailers could take anywhere from 6-18 months.

 

It’s just like Mike Tyson once said: “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the face.” That is why our current generation of DL385 is a great backup server solution. It can help customers pivot into a direction they were not expecting to be in.

 

Which workloads and scenarios are AMD-based HPE ProLiant DL385 servers best suited to? For organizations already using Intel-based servers, can they adopt AMD-based servers to achieve their objectives?

 

Backup – When customers are looking to purchase a Veeam or Convault solution, they should also consider HPE DL385 because these customers are looking for an affordable way to back up their environments.

 

Cache – During E-Rate season for K-12 and local Libraries, this is a great way to obtain a server that can run caching as well as other workloads.

 

Even if your organization is using Intel-based servers, you can take advantage of AMD-based HPE ProLiant DL385 servers for dedicated workloads such as SQL, Backup, and Cache, and may save considerable money doing so.

 

Why is now an opportune time to consider these solutions? Where can people go to learn more?

How about 5 reasons?

 

1. Smarter IT economics – With HPE ProLiant DL385 Servers, you get a server platform with enterprise-grade features at midmarket prices. That gives you the budget flexibility to channel money towards fixing problems like security and reliability.

2. Right-sized performance – Like I mentioned earlier, the HPE ProLiant DL385 provides a reliable and efficient server platform that delivers the right amount of performance to meet most all of your business needs.

3. Enterprise-grade reliability and manageability – Single or dual-socket HPE ProLiant DL385 servers include accessibility, security, and out-of-the-box manageability features. In other words, these servers can run the most common upper-midmarket workloads like an enterprise-level champ.

4. User-inspired design features and Hewlett Packard Enterprise Service + Support – This all comes standard with design features like 24/7 continuous health monitoring, 100% configuration change logging, and faster problem analysis and resolution. In other words, rest assured knowing your servers and applications are safe and sound.

5. A great deal – As of today, CDW is offering these servers for 34% off the list price! It doesn’t get much better than that.

 

To learn more, contact your CDW account manager or visit the HPE ProLiant DL385 page on CDW.com.

 

Events:

Find a Reseller

http://www8.hp.com/us/en/store-finder/index.do?nRGID=192&sSKU=653203-B21

 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

©Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, Opteron, and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

 

ARM and TrustZone are registered trademarks of ARM Limited in the UK and other countries. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other jurisdictions.

On January 14, AMD and key industry partners welcomed the AMD Opteron™ A1100 System-on-Chip (SoC) to the 64-bit ARM® datacenter arena. We knew this signified a major step toward delivering choice, innovation, and scalable performance in the datacenter, but we didn’t know how analysts and other experts would react.

 

In its review of the AMD Opteron A1100 SoC, RackSolutions may have said it best: “If you take eight machines that can process infinite amounts of instructions, all working for you at the same time, the amount of data you can store, manage, and circulate in a short period of time grows to outrageous numbers. Translation: you now have a computing system that is almost as fast at processing and storing information as the human brain. Couple this with a high-speed internet connection and you have one of the best networking systems available to the world at this time.”

 

Offering high-speed network and storage connectivity with outstanding energy efficiency, the AMD Opteron A1100 SoC is a high-performance 64-bit ARM CPU with integrated dual 10Gb Ethernet. With major implications for organizations with demanding server workloads, the best may be yet to come as our ARM ecosystem partners build on this SoC and unveil new innovations.

 

“The secret of the AMD Opteron A1100 SoC’s appeal is not just the cores, it’s everything around the cores,” said Norman Fraser, CEO of SoftIron. “If you’ve got an application where you need to move large amounts of data around quickly, you’re going to love it.”

 

SoftIron backs up this claim with the Overdrive 3000, an ARM developer system powered by an 8-core AMD Opteron A1100 SoC combined with a complete development environment for ARM-based applications. Pre-installed with Linux® from either SUSE Enterprise or openSUSE—and with a complete GNU tool chain—the Overdrive 3000a allows developers to generate portable code and test it in a production environment.

 

Other hardware partners, including 96Boards, CASwell, and Silver Lining Systems, are capitalizing on the AMD Opteron A1100 SoC, creating solutions to serve a variety of workloads ranging from hyperscale computing to network function virtualization. And with support from software partners including ENEA, Linaro, RedHat, and SUSE, the future of the ARM ecosystem looks bright—and customers agree.

 

“The Netzyn Application Streaming Platform (NzASP) was designed for service providers and app vendors to deploy at scale, supporting tens of thousands of servers and tens of millions of app instances,” said Steve Bakke, Founder and CTO of Netzyn.  “After evaluating the AMD Opteron A1100 Series processor, we found it to provide compelling performance and power efficiency for many of our streaming applications, and we look forward to continued collaboration with AMD and their hardware partners to deliver innovative solutions to our customers.”

 

Who wouldn’t want more choice, right-sized performance, and the ability to accelerate the time to deploy ARM? We’re proud to say that with the AMD Opteron A1100 SoC, the future of datacenter innovation looks brighter than ever.

 

  • The AMD Server Team

 

Learn more about the AMD Opteron A1100 SoC at AMD.com.

This post has been authored by Diane Stapley, Director of Alliances at AMD.

 

entrance_picture.jpgWhen it comes to security conferences, the RSA Conference has long been the benchmark for the industry, with engineers, politicians and decision makers all converging in one place. For years AMD engineers and subject matter experts have been going to learn about the latest industry trends, meet with industry partners and forge new relationships that often result in exciting features in future AMD products.

 

AMD has an important role to play in computer security. Our silicon powers millions of devices around the globe and through the help of our engineers and industry partners, AMD platforms incorporate leading-edge security features that help our users keep their data safe.

 

Whereas conferences such as Black Hat and Defcon are stellar venues for low-level security disclosures, at the RSA Conference you can hear how contemporary security issues affect people, governments and large multinational organizations. This year’s conference had a wide variety keynote speakers such as US Attorney General Loretta Lynch, Microsoft’s Chief Legal Officer Brad Smith, Director of the NSA Admiral Michael Rogers and tomorrow some Hollywood glamour will be injected into proceedings with two-time Oscar winning actor Sean Penn closing out the conference.

 

The last few years have seen security front-and-center in the news. Whether it was global brands in retail, national infrastructure, bringing your own smartphone or laptop into work, personal identity theft or security concerns over the Internet of Things, there’s no doubt that public awareness of this topic is high.

 

At the conference, speakers were quick to point to well-known security breaches in their keynote addresses and highlighted the need for encryption and security best practices. What was also very evident was many of the largest organizations are openly admitting that a single company does not hold all of the answers when it comes to security. Collaboration is the name of the game and when Microsoft’s Chief Legal Officer highlights the work his company has done with Google, openly praising a competitor for its collaboration on matters of security and transparency, you get a sense of a willingness to work together. AMD has long used collaboration rather than prescription to provide security features, our work within the ARM TrustZone ecosystem is one such example.

 

When I talk to existing and potential partners there is one message I hear time and again; security is needed throughout the enterprise. Everyone is aware of anti-virus software that runs on their desktop or laptop, but enterprise security means securing the data throughout its lifetime right from the point of creation.

 

Securing our infrastructure --  the network equipment and servers -- is becoming absolutely critical to system security. Admiral Rogers pointed out the recent attack on a Ukraine power plant as an example of how critical infrastructure could be taken down by malicious actors. Such an example should put into sharp focus how important security is within the enterprise, where everything from intellectual property to the control over vital infrastructure are possible targets for hackers.

 

In recent years there has been a lot of talk about biometric authentication: the use of physical characteristics such as fingerprints or eyes to authenticate users. While biometric authentication was a popular topic at RSA Conference, a new trend looks to be developing to further increase security:behaviorial analytics.

 

This area of security looks deeper, beyond the password and biometric data to seek out usage patterns and determine the authenticity of the user. Processing power, especially in the datacenter, will be key to behaviorial analytics as it adds an extra layer of security, one that is transparent to users but improves their protection.

 

My time at the RSA Conference was both eye opening and reassuring. As is the case with such conferences, new types of threats and attack vectors were discussed but it is reassuring to know that the industry is working diligently to overcome these challenges. Perhaps most reassuring of all is that collaboration is the word that is most widely used as a means of tackling these challenges, and it is a model that AMD has adopted a long time ago, working with vendors such as Absolute, ARM, ExactTrak, Infineon, Microsoft, OptioLabs, Trustonic, ST Microelectronics and many others.

 

Security is a complex problem, but AMD, its industry partners and many others in the technology industry are working together to make it seamless and manageable for the user.

 

Diane Stapley is Director of Alliances at AMD. Her postings are her own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites, and references to third party trademarks, are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

Security That Locks You Down, Not In

 

Whoever sang that the holiday season is “the most wonderful time of the year” probably wasn’t an IT pro facing a slew of malware, cyber espionage, and other targeted attacks. As millions of consumers flock to grocery stores, boutiques, and websites to complete their holiday shopping – and millions of businesses gear up to take, fulfill, and ship orders – attackers are gearing up to infiltrate personal and business-critical transactional data. With cybercrime becoming increasingly sophisticated, is it naive to rely on business as usual without, inevitably, receiving a Pandora’s Box of malicious agents?

 

At AMD, we understand that cybercrime is a persistent, 24/7/365 threat. We understand that anti-virus measures alone aren’t enough, that both businesses and consumers need equally persistent defenses against this threat. And we understand that constantly improving data security starts with securing the data center, integrating state-of-the-art software with innovative hardware that protects from the silicon up. If you haven’t heard, we’ve been busy driving this forward in two big ways: the advent of AMD Secure Technology and alignment with ARM® TrustZone®.

 

AMD Secure Technology offers a built-in security system that puts protection right on your processor. For companies with secured infrastructure, this technology can mean heightened security for cloud-based servers that helps protect corporate data and manage remote workers’ machines.

 

ARM TrustZone technology is a system-wide approach to security, isolating and protecting sensitive applications and interfaces to protect services and devices from scalable attacks. Building on open-standards-based architecture and expanding our collaboration with an extensive network of platform providers, we’re working to provide the greatest peace of mind on every AMD product.

 

Case in point: the AMD Opteron™ A1100 processor (formerly codenamed “Seattle”), AMD’s first 64-bit ARM-based processor. Each AMD Opteron A1100 processor has a dedicated 32-bit microcontroller, isolated on-chip ROM and SRAM, and is 100% ARM TrustZone compliant. When you prioritize security at the hardware level, this instills confidence about capabilities, from storage to web serving to software development. Judging by the expanding ARM64 development on AMD by innovators such as SoftIron, Inc. and CircuitCo, we’re contributing to a healthy, growing ARM ecosystem.

 

The reality is that cyber-attacks won’t stop, but neither will our determination to equip you with server technology that’s deeply secure by design, hardware that works hand-in-hand with software to help protect your business, your customers, and your future.

 

  • The AMD Server Team

norman_fraser_softiron.jpgUntil recently, ARM has been notable by its absence from the server market. But the last couple of years have seen the arrival of 64-bit ARM-based server processors such as Applied Micro’s 8-core X-Gene, using the 8-core AMD Opteron A1100 processor, and Cavium’s 48-core Thunder-X, each of which supports vital enterprise features such as ECC memory and virtualization.

 

Some may grumble that first-generation ARM server processors are not the cheapest or the most powerful or (no kidding!) made by Intel, but it is nothing short of remarkable that the first generation of a brand new class of server silicon is already finding niches that matter to users where it out-performs Nth-generation x86 silicon.

 

Of course, x86 will continue to be a major player in the server arena. But though it possesses impressive product maturity and market share, it lacks the structural advantage of ARM’s licensing business model, a model that offers more diversity and choice for better-fit solutions. In addition to Applied Micro, AMD, and Cavium, other heavyweight players look set to bring their own ARM-based 64-bit server SoC ranges to market, and we see ARM as an opportunity to grab a share of the sizeable server market.

 

To date, ARM has licensed its designs to more than 1,200 partners,1 with awesome cumulative market reach. This private army of innovators has powered ARM’s seemingly inexorable advance into new markets and supercharged its market share growth. The number of chips containing ARM processors shipping per year grew from a few hundred million in 2000 to more than 12 billion in 2014. 1 With that kind of track record, I believe it would take a brave observer to bet against ARM succeeding in the server arena.

 

The strength, number, and reach of ARM’s licensees are key to why we at SoftIron believe ARM has a better chance of success than PowerPC. The ARM community has an enviable track record of grabbing market share once product meets the functional criteria required in each market niche to be colonized. Data centers prove the point. ARM processors are already pervasive in the data center, in the shape of storage disc controllers, environment monitors, and a host of other instrumented functions, where attaining the necessary functional criteria led inexorably to market share growth. We believe the same process is now beginning with respect to the data center’s headline act: the server CPU.

 

At SoftIron, we’re proud to be amongst the first to launch 64-bit ARM-based products into the market and to be partnering with silicon innovators like AMD. Our experience of selling into the emerging market gives us an almost unique perspective on what is actually driving ARM server interest and sales.

 

Sure, people are interested in performance per watt, packing density, thermal footprint, and total cost of ownership. These matter, and the arrival of ARM in the data center brings new options, especially as adopters look to improve operational efficiency through workload optimization. But what ARM server adopters want most of all is choice. Choice to build redundancy across more than one server architecture. Choice to be a little less dependent on the dominant silicon vendor. Choice to explore for themselves where x86 makes sense and where ARM offers better performance against KPIs.

 

Norman Fraser PhD is Co-founder and CEO of SoftIron, a leader in ARM-based enterprise computing products with bases in England and Silicon Valley.

 

1 ARM Holdings, Q3 Roadshow Slides, http://phx.corporate-ir.net/External.File?item=UGFyZW50SUQ9MzA4NzI0fENoaWxkSUQ9LTF8VHlwZT0z&t=1&cb=635808699811700259

What do supercomputing experts, data scientists, students, musicians, and actor Alan Alda have in common? For one thing, they’ll all be attending the upcoming Supercomputing Conference (SC15) in Austin, TX.

 

High-performance computing (HPC) is transforming our lives and SC15 is a unique opportunity to spotlight HPC and scientific applications, as well as innovations from around the world. AMD views this conference as a testament to – and reason to celebrate – the ever-expanding innovation and discovery in HPC. And with the conference returning to Austin for its 27th anniversary, the HPC community has much to unveil and share.

 

Running from November 15th – 20th, SC15 will bring together the international supercomputing community for an exceptional program of technical papers, informative tutorials, timely research posters and Bird-of-a-Feather sessions. The SC15 Exhibition Hall will feature the latest and greatest technologies from industry, academia, and government research organizations, many of these technologies making their debut in Austin. Naturally, AMD is excited about SC15 for several reasons.

 

For starters, we’re leading some eye-opening demos, from debugging and profiling HSA applications using AMD tools, to efficient management of hybrid memories, to exploring parallel programming models for heterogeneous computing systems. With our booth hosting numerous demos and a theater area for attendees, you can’t (and shouldn’t) miss us.

 

Beyond our booth, we’re sponsoring the Northeastern University team in Student Cluster Challenge Competition team with AMD Opteron™ processors using Symmetric Computing’s shared memory architecture. AMD Research is meeting with industry experts on ExaScale to discuss supercomputing developments to help drive substantial speed improvements with minimal power increases. And since it wouldn’t be the Supercomputing Conference without some exciting nightlife, we’re sponsoring the Beowulf Bash reception on Monday evening the 16th, complete with a mechanical bull riding contest. With more than 600 people planned to attend, it should be an unforgettable night.

 

Of course there are unique demos and contributions from our partners, too. On Tuesday November 17th, Richard Anderson, CEO of Symmetric Computing, will present on large shared memory and many core HPC. And on Wednesday November 18th, Tim Massey, President of SoftIron, will explain how to develop on ARM64 using AMD and SoftIron solutions. These are just a couple instances of the remarkable HPC innovators and innovations descending on Austin.

 

Clearly, HPC matters – not just to conference participants, but to policymakers and the general public as well. If you’re able to attend to SC15, we recommend it. If not, you can still track the pulse of the HPC community by following the #HPCmatters campaign on Twitter. As the conference progresses, you’ll find a series of high-impact videos showcasing how new approaches and innovations can transform our datacenters, classrooms, homes, and beyond.

 

  • The AMD Server Team

 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein.

 

©2015 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, FirePro, Opteron and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

 

ARM is a registered trademark of ARM Limited in the UK and other countries.

ben_sander.jpgBen Sander

HSA Software Architect, AMD

 

As you and your team prepare for SC15, what have you been up to since last year’s Supercomputing Conference?

There’s been a lot of advancement. Last year we showcased some initial work on HSA with AMD APU technology. That initial demonstration was all about power efficiency, and it was well received by attendees. But this year, we’re building on previous tools to create a C++ compiler that could have very positive implications across a broad spectrum of computing platforms, from embedded to supercomputing. The goal of this work is to increase compiler stability and support a wider variety of hardware, which could further unlock and simplify a broader range of hardware, both in terms of GPUs and APUs. It’s about achieving greater performance and power efficiency. I can’t share all of the details quite yet, but we have some exciting announcements slated for the conference.

 

Who is AMD working with to develop this?

Our engineers are collaborating with MulticoreWare (MCW) engineers to develop the C++ compiler. Like AMD, MCW is a member of the HSA Foundation, and their Chief Technology Officer, Wen-Mei Hwu, is one of the foremost compiler experts in the world. As you might expect, AMD and MCW working together makes sense to share expertise, and it’s been a great experience.

 

How could this compiler potentially impact different workloads or industries?

There’s broad potential for taking advantage of this compiler technology. Machine learning. Parallel computing. These are a couple areas where this compiler could positively impact HPC. This could also be used across a breadth of industries, such as oil and gas, life sciences, finance. In situations where people are running programs based in C++, this compiler technology could help enable the wider use of devices like AMD FirePro™ GPUs in HPC.

 

What else can SC15 attendees expect from AMD during the conference?

AMD and our technology partners are presenting a variety of innovations, from single developers to enterprise development. Expect a whole host of demos for our AMD FirePro™ products, not to mention some demos on ARM® development, including SoftIron’s Overdrive 3000. If you can attend SC15, I highly recommend it.

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein.

 

©2015 Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, FirePro, Opteron and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

 

ARM is a registered trademark of ARM Limited in the UK and other countries.

dan_flotten.jpg.jpgDaniel Flotten

Technical Sales Specialist – Data Center

PC Connection

 

What should organizations considering new servers keep in mind to get what they need, instead of just paying for the latest and greatest?

You should start by asking, “What do we need to satisfy our actual workload requirements?” That in mind, it’s important to look for a solid platform with technology that isn’t going EoL within a year, management capabilities in line with your needs and comfort level, and robust and ongoing support.

 

How far ahead are most of your customers planning when considering new servers? How far ahead should they (or can they) be planning?

This runs the gamut, but there are some trends. For instance, companies with about 1,000 employees and a robust data center often engage in roadmapping conversations on an ongoing basis and plan for specific refreshes about 6 months ahead. Companies with over 100 employees and a well-planned data center may begin planning for significant server refreshes about 3-5 months ahead of time. And small environments with only a couple servers may allow their systems to age until there is a break/fix issue, or support costs more than new equipment.

 

Of course the more planning the better. If you are going to spend more than $50K on servers, you should have a couple roadmapping sessions with your preferred vendors each year and allow at least 30 days to fine tune your builds.

 

Which workloads have you tested AMD-based HP ProLiant servers against? Which workloads are these servers best suited to?

The AMD-based ProLiant servers are a good fit for physical environments, such as domain controllers, file servers, Active Directory and DNS servers. Also, organizations refreshing from Windows Server 2003 without much virtualization are strong candidates.

 

For organizations already using Intel-based servers, in which scenarios can they also adopt AMD-based servers to achieve their objectives?

Organizations currently using Intel servers might also consider adopting AMD servers for multiple scenarios, such as dedicated vCenter/System Center servers; refreshing older, underutilized Intel models with current-gen AMD servers; testing and development to ensure programs are solid under a variety of circumstances; and failover or high availability strategies.

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein.

 

©Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

 

ARM and TrustZone are registered trademarks of ARM Limited in the UK and other countries. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other jurisdictions.

As the next major evolution of the Internet, devices and machines of all different shapes and sizes are being connected to the Internet, to each other, and to people. But building this more-connected future means embedding processors and sensors in seemingly every device we use. This dramatic growth in the number of network access points will make it increasingly difficult to manage security through software alone. And for various IT sectors based on legacy operating systems, the discontinuation of security patch support is real cause for concern.

 

By accessing the data being transmitted between Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled devices in homes, cars, or offices, hackers could potentially analyze confidential information from financial transactions to patient health records. And this concern is just the tip of the iceberg when compared to possible future security issues. Network connected devices with sensors and processors will increase significantly in the coming years, and this will create the need for hardware developers and engineers to look at security in a very different way; to develop an integrated security solution for our day-to-day devices.

 

There are two major camps for hardware-based security: proprietary or closed architecture, and architecture based on industry standards. AMD is a long-time supporter of industry standards and thus has opted for the latter, joining an expansive security ecosystem based on ARM® TrustZone® technology.

 

The AMD Secure Processor is planned to be the hardware root of trust across all AMD products including client, server, graphics, and embedded businesses. Under the umbrella of AMD Secure Technology, the AMD Secure Processor joins other AMD IP innovations from the No Execute Bit to the Secure Asset Management Unit as the future of AMD’s security strategy. This type of open-standards innovation has implications across security-dependent use cases, from authentication, geo-fencing, and systems management to remote support, financial transactions, and digital rights management.

 

Together with our customers, we have identified areas of focus to enable software partners to create complete solutions for the markets we are addressing. Components of these solutions are engineered to work together, while leaving room for our OEM partners to truly differentiate for enterprise-grade platform offerings.

 

Security is no longer a task that can lean most heavily on the software industry. It’s our vision that through a hardware-based security strategy built on the industry–standard approach of ARM® TrustZone® technology, AMD will enable enhanced security options for our customers and technology partners and help ensure our increasingly digital lives are less vulnerable.

 

To learn more about AMD Secure Technology and our alignment with ARM TrustZone technology, visit amd.com/security.

 

 

 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein.

 

©Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

 

ARM and TrustZone are registered trademarks of ARM Limited in the UK and other countries. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other jurisdictions.

Q&A with Lane Shelton, VP of Software Business Development at PC Connection

 

lane_shelton.jpgHow many organizations have migrated off Windows® Server 2003? How many are still on it?

 

There’s a lot of Windows Server 2003 users still out there. We see it first-hand working with customers doing deep-core licensing analysis because we have to know where all the VMs, clusters, and servers are to determine the best ways to pay for it all. We’ve all read the statistics, and our work with customers confirms it—Windows Server 2003 is still a workhorse, even in today’s modern datacenters.

 

January 2015 survey by Spiceworks showed that 15% of respondents had fully migrated their environment while 48% had partially migrated and 28% percent remained in the planning stages. That said, 8% of respondents had no plans to migrate from Windows Server 2003, even though the vast majority of these dead-enders (85%) cited concerns about security.

 

Of the organizations still on Windows Server 2003, how many are using other legacy software and hardware? What are some of the common obstacles preventing these orgs from getting current?

 

We don’t quite know how many organizations are both still on Windows Server 2003 and using other legacy software and hardware. If the survey mentioned above is any indication, 22% of the IT pros who responded cited lack of time and budget constraints as the key barriers to fully upgrading, which are often obstacles to upgrading software, hardware, OS, anything really.

 

What are the risks of not migrating?

 

The first and most obvious danger associated with an abandoned server platform is that the manufacturer no longer will issue fixes and patches for vulnerabilities that could be exploited by viruses, spyware and other malicious code. This can spell serious trouble for all businesses running Windows Server 2003 but especially those in heavily compliance-dependent industries. But other dangers aren’t quite as obvious. For instance, Windows Server 2003 servers aren’t equipped to run the advanced virtualization tools that enable cloud integration, so failure to migrate could mean lost business agility and lost opportunity.

 

On the other hand, what are the benefits of migrating to Windows® Server 2012 R2?

 

Taking action can pay back big time, and quickly. According to the Forrester Research report titled “The Total Economic Impact of Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2”, businesses can expect to see a whopping 270 percent return on investment (ROI) with a six month payback for their investment in migrating to this new OS. What’s more, the report cited a 35 percent reduction in ongoing server management costs and further savings due to reduced need for expensive SAN gear to integrate with new server features and functionality. I’d add that 30% of the Spiceworks survey respondents said they planned to purchase new physical servers and operating systems as part of the Windows Server 2012 R2 migration process, which can enable Windows Server 2012 R2 to perform even better.

 

For organizations still on Windows Server 2003, what steps would you recommend to get current?

 

Since Windows Server 2003 is leaving the picture, it’s the perfect time to take a step back and think about the future. What should the next revision of your information infrastructure look like? There are real long-term advantages to migrating to Windows Server 2012 R2 and its worth considering server upgrades at the same time for optimal cloud integration and performance. The PC Connection team has designed this helpful tool to get you started and we recommend checking out http://www.pcconnection.com/brand/amd/servers to see how upgrading your servers can boost performance and efficiency even further. Windows Server 2003 EOS is happening regardless of how you act, so why not plan wisely and invest in proven performance?

 

 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein.

 

©Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, Opteron and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

 

ARM is a registered trademark of ARM Limited in the UK and other countries. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other jurisdictions.

This article was authored by Matthew Kimball, Strategic Marketing Manager at AMD.

 

Price. Performance. Reliability. Which has the biggest impact on purchase decisions? Or does it come down to finding the right balance of all three?

 

Every business has to balance these factors, among others. And while most businesses’ demands on IT increase each year, most IT budgets don’t. Whether you’re approaching end of life of legacy servers or embarking on new applications or web projects, when it comes to investing in new server infrastructure, finding the right balance of price, performance, and reliability is critical.

 

It doesn’t make sense to pay for solutions that don’t provide enough performance, or to overpay for performance you won’t use, or to invest in unreliable solutions. And according to IDC’s 2013 Server Workload Forecast and Analysis Study, 65% of mid-sized businesses’ server workloads only hit bottlenecks when memory or I/O max out, not CPU. The remaining 35%? Only about 10% truly tax the speed and processing capability of the CPU. It makes you wonder how many businesses are overpaying for wasted compute.

 

CIOs, CTOs, IT directors, data center managers… these are smart, discerning people, which makes it even more curious why some pay for server performance they won’t use to run recurring daily workloads. The smarter approach is ensuring enough performance to get the job done right for the right price. This can free up budget to invest in performance-boosting enhancements to memory capacity and I/O, or perhaps fund overdue IT initiatives. This approach can extend IT budgets and investments while enabling great user experiences at the best price. I call that an all-around win.

 

If you believe in pursuing a smarter approach to infrastructure investments, HP and AMD offer smarter server solutions tailored to your needs. Both HP and AMD have a heritage of reliable, enterprise-grade performance, and HP ProLiant rack and blade servers built on AMD Opteron™ series processors power some of the most mission-critical applications in the world’s largest data centers—from virtualization, database and cloud to LOB, unified communications, and multi-purpose needs. Tried and true, these HP ProLiant servers now come at an even smarter price for potentially significant CapEx savings compared to many of the alternatives. Even if you’ve standardized on another CPU vendor, it’s worth learning how much you can save by matching these HP ProLiant server solutions to your needs.

 

The next time you’re evaluating servers, think about the platform that is going to provide the biggest bang for your buck. Think about server technology that will deliver the right amount of compute at the best price. It comes down to performance that matters, and AMD-based HP ProLiant servers deliver that in spades. Don’t take my word for it—see for yourself at http://www.pcconnection.com/brand/amd/servers.

 


 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein.

 

© Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, Opteron and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

ARM is a registered trademark of ARM Limited in the UK and other countries. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the US and other jurisdictions.

amd-firepro-s9150-server-graphics.pngAMD is one of Silicon Valley’s oldest semiconductor companies and we were excited to see our iconic AMD Radeon™ graphics cards featured in an episode of the hit HBO series “Silicon Valley”. In the show, the characters use graphics cards to build a high performance compute cluster in order to run their proprietary universal compression engine “800 times faster than on the CPU alone” – or so they claim.

 

What we do know is that AMD Radeon graphics cards are the ideal tools for gaming, providing the ultimate visual experience for gaming and virtual reality. Since the fictional team at “Pied Piper” created a compression solution to solve big data storage problems, not play games, it’s safe to assume they might see even more performance if they used AMD FirePro™ professional graphics cards for high performance compute.

 

The idea of using graphics cards is not new and certainly not confined to the world of television. In fact the world’s most energy efficient supercomputer, the L-CSC based at the GSI Helmholtz Center makes use of AMD FirePro S9150 server graphics cards and sits on top of the prestigious Green 500, (November, 2014 ranking), a list that ranks supercomputers by energy efficiency.

 

We’ve all been there; you need to build a high performance compute cluster for research, financial modelling or big data analysis but you don’t want to melt the ice caps or empty your wallet doing simulations. The good news is that this is not an isolated problem and thanks to AMD and our range of FirePro graphics cards, you can crunch numbers in an energy efficient manner while keeping your bank manager happy.

 

AMD FirePro graphics can run code that has been programmed in the industry-standard OpenCL™ language. This language is widely supported and has a highly active developer ecosystem and libraries such as clMath that include Fast Furrier Transform (FFT) and Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS), enabling researchers to quickly accelerate their programs on AMD FirePro cards.

 

So what makes AMD FirePro such a good fit for high performance computing? Take the aforementioned AMD FirePro S9150 server GPU, a number crunching monster that devours datasets and produces data that scientists and researchers can use for research papers and engineering.

 

The chip inside the card is designed for energy-efficient double-precision calculations – with up to 2.53 TFLOPS of peak performance -- so work can be done to greater precision without sacrificing performance – and is absolutely critical when it comes to scientific research and financial modelling.

 

An AMD FirePro card needs data to work on and, unlike consumer graphics cards, the server-orientated AMD FirePro S9150 GPU has 16GB GDDR5 memory to store vast datasets. Alongside capacity you need reliability and AMD FirePro S-series cards use Error Correction Code (ECC) technology to ensure data integrity and the right results.

 

As AMD FirePro cards are meant to be used in harsh datacenter environments. They are designed to work without any direct cooling; instead, they use the cooling already in the server. This means there are fewer moving parts in the server; helping ensure users get the maximum uptime possible.

 

AMD FirePro cards are much more than brutal number crunchers. Having all of this compute power comes to nought if it isn’t energy efficient. Being energy efficient is not just about saving money on electricity bills; energy efficiency means being able to pack more compute per watt. AMD FirePro graphics cards have proven to be ahead of the pack, with the L-CSC cluster using AMD FirePro S9150 cards certified as the world’s most energy efficient high performance computing cluster.

 

It’s important to remember that you should use the right tool for the job. If you find yourself in a similar situation to Gilfoyle, co-CTO of your hot new Silicon Valley start-up, do your homework. The odds are you are looking for an energy efficient compute cluster, so go with what the pros use. Go with AMD FirePro GPUs!

 

 

Karl Freund is a Corporate Vice President at AMD. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites, and references to third party trademarks, are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

sage_logo.pngSage Electronic Engineering, has released an updated SageBIOS™ Board Support Package (BSP) for AMD’s 2nd Generation Embedded R-Series APUs (previously codenamed “Bald Eagle”) as well as a demonstration boot ROM image for evaluation on the Lamar (DB-FP3) development board.

 

The demonstration boot image is released in an Open Source Package (OSP), including coreboot® and SeaBIOS open source files and a packaged software solution for flashing the SPI memory. SageBIOS BSPs are routinely updated and tested to accommodate changes in the binary images supporting open source development, quality updates, and reintegration of improved open source files and validation with multiple distributions of Windows®, Linux®, DOS and RTOS.

 

“We believe this SageBIOS BSP is ideal for embedded solutions, as it can be customized to reduce both boot times and the firmware footprint,” said Scott Hoot, president of Sage. Sage is an Embedded Software, Solution and Tool Partner with AMD, offering substantial experience in AGESA open source files and virtualization binaries.

 

Made for embedded applications, the AMD 2nd Generation R-Series APUs (Accelerated Processing Units) are aimed at bringing 4K quality displays to gaming machines, medical imaging devices, digital signage, industrial control and automation machines, and communications and networking infrastructure systems that are increasingly relying on compute and graphics processing technology.

 

SageBIOS supports most modern x86 platforms from AMD with a combination of open source (including coreboot®) as well as proprietary firmware solutions. Sage Custom BSPs are ported to customer hardware designs to add feature sets such as code reduction, fast boots and enhanced security.

 

About Sage:

Sage Electronic Engineering, LLC, of Longmont, Colo. (www.se-eng.com), provides customized Board Support Packages marrying open source (including coreboot®) solutions with proprietary software, creating streamlined boot solutions that also create flexibility in application. Sage partners with processor manufacturers, including AMD, to provide coreboot solutions for the open source community, as well as developing SageBIOS™ BSPs for customers desiring the flexibility of open source firmware stripped of unnecessary code and backed by rigorously tested, validated and supported solutions.

Contact: dennis.batchelor@se-eng.com; 303-495-5499

 

Dennis Batchelor is the VP Marketing for Sage Electronic Engineering. His postings are his own opinions and may not represent AMD’s positions, strategies or opinions. Links to third party sites, and references to third party trademarks, are provided for convenience and illustrative purposes only. Unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such links, and no third party endorsement of AMD or any of its products is implied.

william_toll_profitbricks.jpgQ&A with William Toll, VP Marketing at ProfitBricks

 

What is ProfitBricks’ mission and how is it playing out in 2015?

 

ProfitBricks is the Cloud Computing IaaS provider that offers painless cloud infrastructure for all IT users. With no learning curve and infrastructure that behaves like on-premises physical servers, storage, and networks, it’s helping IT teams migrate to the cloud painlessly.

 

The momentum for ProfitBricks continues to grow, as Cloud Computing deployments move from early adopter and “cloud natives” to general IT, and managed service providers look for a public cloud that can meet their requirements while not needing to retrain. Our price/performance guarantee, that any workload deployed on ProfitBricks will cost less than the same workload running at the same performance level on the IaaS platforms of major cloud providers, is also welcome relief to cloud providers that have confusing pricing tiers, and poor, inconsistent performance.

 

How has market demand for public cloud services changed from 2010 (when ProfitBricks was founded) to now?

 

The founders of ProfitBricks looked at the state of Cloud Computing in 2010 and saw that users had to adapt to the cloud because the cloud was not flexible, had poor performance, and was not easy to use. ProfitBricks hired a large multi-national team of engineers and started building a second- generation cloud platform. The platform launched in 2013 and received numerous awards and recognition from Gartner, Frost & Sullivan, SIIA, and CRN. The ProfitBricks IaaS Cloud Computing platform solved many of the problems of the first generation of clouds from major cloud providers.

 

But now the market has changed— back in 2010 through 2014, Cloud IaaS was mainly purchased by early adopters, developers, and startups. There have also been some new entrants from traditional IT vendors like Microsoft and newer ones like Google. In general, the market seems to mainly consist of two types of Cloud providers: those that replicate decades of IT business practices and those that only offer the cloud with their professional services.

 

ProfitBricks offers one thing: IaaS. Cloud servers, cloud storage, and cloud networks that offer complete flexibility and high performance and can be configured using our Data Center Designer and/or our APIs and SDKs.

 

The DevOps movement has made infrastructure “sexy.” The plethora of tools (Chef, Puppet, Ansible, SaltStack) and the process changes that continuous integration and deployments have brought are driving developers and operations pros to work together like never before.

 

How does AMD server technology support ProfitBricks’ mission?

 

Our mission is to build out hardware for thousands of customers. That hardware needs to be scalable and repeatable. Our CEO, Achim Weiss, and his technical team are big fans of AMD and Supermicro. We knew that in order to offer a high-performance, flexible cloud-computing product, it was all about CPU cores. And we decided to launch on Supermicro servers featuring multicore AMD Opteron™ processors, and we’ve been exclusively AMD since launch.

 

AMD CPU cores are the engines of the cloud. Now that IT teams can access anywhere between 1 CPU core and 1 GB of RAM to 62 CPU cores and 240 GB of RAM on a physical server—and have access to that server within minutes—all sorts of new workloads are possible. Big data and the move to a digital business are driving a massive increase in the number of servers deployed.

 

ProfitBricks provides the highest price/performance ratio in the public cloud computing space, and similarly, AMD processors provide the best price/performance ratio with the highest core density.

 

What themes are you seeing impact and evolve the datacenter in 2015? What role is ProfitBricks playing in this?

 

We are seeing on-premises data center managers open up to the cloud and wish to find a cloud provider they can work with. The pressure to move from CAPEX to OPEX is growing, and the C-Suite is now pushing for cloud. It’s no longer just IT that will push for a cloud solution. Business leaders value the agility and the new value that IT can provide when they move to cloud infrastructure. 

 

Data center managers that have infrastructure in co-location providers are also considering cloud, while they don’t have the overhead of on-premises data centers (power, cooling, fire suppression, physical security) — they too have a growing need to be more agile.

 

From Big Data to Internet of Things, the need for more IT infrastructure (CPUs, RAM, Storage) and the networks that connect them is growing rapidly, and data center managers are unable to keep up with the requests without turning to the cloud.

 

Data center managers that have deployed DCIM (Data Center Infrastructure Management) tools are also looking for a cloud they can work with. Many of them are not running “DevOps teams” that code against APIs; they are more like traditional IT teams. They are looking for a cloud provider that offers a tool like the ProfitBricks Data Center Designer that offers a visual way to manage multiple data centers.

 

What is the most rewarding part of your role?

 

Knowing that businesses and their IT teams and developers will be more productive, creative, and profitable due to the powerful business results that migrating to the cloud can bring.

 

 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein.

 

©Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, Opteron and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

According to IDC, “The datacenter must serve as the primary point of engagement and information exchange with employees, partners, and customers in today’s interconnected world.”* This belief has long been the basis for our innovation at AMD and it resonated once again at our 2015 Financial Analyst Day, where our leaders shared a renewed vision and a clear plan to build on our pioneering heritage.

 

Making this happen means bringing competitive solutions back to the datacenter. At the forefront of this is “Zen,” AMD’s completely new high-performance x86 core design. The next-generation AMD Opteron™ processors will be based on the “Zen” core and will include some exciting enhancements, including simultaneous multithreading (SMT) for high throughput, disruptive memory bandwidth, and high native I/O capacity.

 

Our work developing server silicon also includes investments in ARM® Ltd’s 64-bit ARMv8 architecture to encourage innovation in a way not seen since the introduction of AMD64. Our goal? Allow engineers to more efficiently serve key workloads such as web hosting, networking, and cold storage. Delivering on this goal begins with our ARM Cortex®-A57-powered AMD Opteron™ A1100 Series Processors (codenamed “Seattle”). As innovative developers find new uses for “Seattle” and the ARM software ecosystem continues to grow, we will also be honing our next-generation ARM processors, based on the custom “K12” core. While “K12” will leverage many of the advances in our x86 development, how we develop this core will be based on the demands of our ecosystem to balance high performance with real-world efficiency.

 

Complementing advancements in x86 and ARM, we continue to think of revolutionary technologies that will drive datacenter evolution. AMD introduced the APU in 2011, bringing together the CPU and GPU on chip. Now think about AMD bringing APU to the heart of the datacenter. Building on previous advancements, we are focused on driving server technology to support HPC and machine learning leadership through a high-performance APU that lowers the barrier for developers to use GPU acceleration and delivers massive improvements to vector applications with scale-up graphics performance, HSA enablement, and optimized memory architecture.

 

From next generation AMD Opteron and ARM processors to server APU, our datacenter solutions will continue to be the optimal balance of power and performance. We are committed to enabling the ecosystem with differentiated solutions, fostering rapid innovation through an open and partner-friendly approach, and leveraging our strengths in high-performance CPU and GPU to deliver cutting-edge technologies that help our customer push the boundaries.

 

If we had to sum up Financial Analyst Day 2015, it would be that we are the infrastructure for the next wave. As new workloads emerge with shifting performance demands, we are uniquely qualified to answer the call with solutions that optimize your datacenter, satisfy your users, and drive your business forward.

 

 

*Worldwide Datacenter Census and Construction 2014-2018 Forecast: Aging Enterprise Datacenters and the Accelerating Service Provider Buildout (Doc #251830), IDC

 

DISCLAIMER

Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD is not responsible for third party content and does not necessarily endorse the comments made herein.

 

©Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. All rights reserved. AMD, the AMD Arrow logo, Opteron and combinations thereof are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.  Other product names used in this publication are for identification purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective companies.

 

ARM and Cortex are registered trademarks of ARM Limited in the UK and other countries.