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2 Posts authored by: jcbaratault Employee

To address the challenge of cost-effectively profiling oil and gas deposits, an innovative Russian geophysical service company, JSC Gradient, located in Kazan, Republic of Tatarstan, turned both to the Institute of System Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences and to AMD to assist in the effort. This successful collaboration brought together JSC Gradient’s methodology of mathematical modeling of seismic wave propagation in solid media with one of Russia’s leading centers of High-Performance Computing research.

 

Historically, JSC Gradient started out with limited resources for using general-purpose processors to scientifically verify their methodology.

 

“Our customers, such as Gazprom, Tatneft and Lukoil, are constantly developing areas with increasingly complex geological structures,” said Evgeny Biryaltsev, LLC Gradient Technology and R&D Director of JSC Gradient.  “This demands solving the seismic wave propagation problem not only in the simplest 2D case, but also in 3D. In order to meet the computational demands we had to urgently upgrade our cluster.”

 

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JSC Gradient consulted with experts at the Institute of System Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences to further improve the implementation. The Institute recommended a state-of-the-art professional solution from AMD -- AMD FirePro™ W9100 GPUs -- as the basis for the company's compute cluster, since the compute optimizations required both high memory bandwidth and as much GPU memory as possible.

 

“The AMD FirePro W9100 GPU algorithm benchmarks showed that the GPUs had superior performance for our needs,” said Dr. Denis Demidov, senior researcher at the Institute of System Research. “We approximated that 20 GPUs would be enough to solve the models of up to one billion elements, which was a requirement by JSC Gradient. The final design of the compute cluster included six nodes with four GPUs each to provide some reserve.”

 

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After initial setup and tuning, conducted jointly by JSC Gradient, Institute of System Research of RAS, and LLC Baiko, the cluster was tested with a well-known LINPACK benchmark. The six-node cluster with 24 AMD FirePro W9100 GPUs showed impressive performance of 36.6 TFLOPs, securing 38th position in the Russian top 50 supercomputers rating. The cluster showed both the highest performance per compute unit and the best GFLOPS/Watt ratio on the list. This was also the highest ranked system in the list based on AMD FirePro GPUs.

 

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“Currently, we are engaged in a number of major projects, in particular on the additional exploration of OAO Gazprom licensed areas in the Caspian region and Eastern Siberia and in projects in Latin America,” said Nikolay Shabalin Director of JSC Gradient. “All of these projects are characterized by complex geology, and we have to carry out large-scale numerical experiments on three-dimensional models. Powered by AMD FirePro GPUs, we are able to successfully cope with the new challenges and adjust our technology to further increase the success of drilling both in traditional fields and in the fields of shale hydrocarbons. The increased drilling success is something in which all our customers have interest in the face of declining hydrocarbons prices.”

 

AMD FirePro professional cards include the AMD FirePro W-series boards with active cooling for Workstations and the AMD FirePro S-series with passive heat sinks for Server integration. AMD professional graphics cards offer powerful performance for research where high performance computing is a critical factor, especially when it comes to locating critical resources such as oil and gas deposits.

 

JC Baratault is a Senior Development Manager for HPC GPU computing at AMD. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD, the AMD Arrow logo and FirePro are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Other names are for informational purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective owners.

Developers face an ever increasing task that makes their programming jobs more daunting every day. As more and more Internet-based devices come to market and gain acceptance from consumers, new code is required to ensure data-centric applications operate optimally on a variety of platforms. But what if there exists today a way to make developers’ lives easier in the coding process?

 

AMD has a mandate to support open solutions for developer communities. We have embraced OpenCL™ as the first truly open and royalty-free programming standard for general-purpose computations on heterogeneous systems. With a wide range of supported CPU and GPU processors, AMD is committed to the developer community by providing tools, SDKs, libraries, resources and support to encourage further advancements in the OpenCL open standard.

 

To continue the process of educating the growing global community, AMD participated in the annual International Workshop on OpenCL (IWOCL) meeting to engage and promote discussion about OpenCL. This year’s event was held at Stanford University. Regarded as one of the world’s leading research and teaching institutions, the university is located in Palo Alto, California and offered OpenCL users, researchers, developers and suppliers the opportunity to exchange OpenCL best practices and promote the evolution and advancement of the standard.

 

 

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IWOCL is the premier forum for the presentation and discussion of new designs, trends, algorithms, programming models, software, tools and ideas for OpenCL. Additionally, IWOCL provides a formal channel for community feedback to OpenCL promoters and contributors.

 

As a Platinum sponsor of this event, AMD exhibited the OpenCL™ 2.0 SDK featuring HP Proliant DL380 Gen9 server with AMD FirePro™ S9150 Server GPUs.

 

AMD and HP sponsored the Advanced Hands On OpenCL™ tutorial led by Simon McIntosh-Smith from the University of Bristol. The forty attendees were instructed on the advanced concepts of OpenCL using a mix of OpenCL™ C and C++ host APIs. Attendees at the tutorial had access to the University of Bristol’s “OpenCL™ zoo”; a diverse collection of OpenCL conformant devices to run their own programs on devices and explore the performance portability of OpenCL. The tutorial featured HP Proliant DL380 Gen9 server with AMD FirePro S9150 for the hands-on exercises.

 

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OpenCL continues to gain acceptance by developers and programmers. For example, we’ve seen the ease of porting code to various platforms that ensure the smooth flow of critical data. Whether the platform is a non-stop, energy efficient supercomputer or a wearable on your wrist, developers are choosing OpenCL as the tool to ensure their valuable code is efficiently and properly implemented in today’s data driven world.

 

JC Baratault is an industry executive for Professional Graphics at AMD. Links to third party sites are provided for convenience and unless explicitly stated, AMD is not responsible for the contents of such linked sites and no endorsement is implied.

 

AMD, the AMD Arrow logo and FirePro are trademarks of Advanced Micro Devices, Inc. Other names are for informational purposes only and may be trademarks of their respective owners. OpenCL and the OpenCL logo are trademarks of Apple Inc. used by permission by Khronos