I spent this week at Dell Technologies World, and they sure know how to put on a show. The energy was palpable, with jam-packed keynotes, dynamic guru speakers and interactive breakout sessions. Dell truly is “making it real” and we are pleased to be a key technology partner along this journey with our EPYC™ single and dual socket platforms.

 

DTW Booth 2.jpgWith more than 14,000 attendees at this year’s event, our AMD booth experienced heavy traffic, with all eyes on our “AMD is EPYC” campaign highlighting Dell EMC PowerEdge products. We showed off a series of demos that underscored why EPYC is the ideal foundation for a variety of workloads including HPC (25% greater performance for workloads like Computational Fluid Dynamics[i]), database management, VM migration (simplified integration with VMware vSphere), data analytics (faster Apache Spark™ with 25% fewer servers[ii]) and more.

 

On Tuesday, I hosted a breakout session that focused on the compute, memory, I/O and security advantages of our EPYC CPUs + Dell EMC PowerEdge servers for software-defined, virtualized and high-performance computing (HPC) workloads in today’s datacenter.

 

The session covered everything from the current datacenter landscape and IT challenges with incrementalism, to how we re-entered the market with a fresh approach and unparalleled features, to the specific advantages that EPYC processors provides for target workloads, to the head-to-head comparison of both the single socket Dell EMC PowerEdge R6415 and Dell EMC PowerEdge R7415 servers against relative Intel-based platforms. The results did the talking, with the EPYC 7351 processor in the Dell EMC PowerEdge R6415 delivering 33% more memory per processor[iii] and 33% more cores[iv] than the competition, and the EPYC 7601 powering the Dell EMC PowerEdge R7415 offering 33% more memory per processor[v] and 14% more cores[vi] than competitive offerings, and according to Dell offers up to 20% better TCO per four-node cluster for vSAN deployments at the edge[vii]. Together with Dell EMC PowerEdge, we are redefining the rules of the modern datacenter, improving performance and adding competitive value for our customers.

 

AMD really is striking at the heart of the market with EPYC processors, and the past few days have reinforced our commitment to the EPYC portfolios of today as well as primed audiences for our plans for future generations of groundbreaking products. We are helping OEMs, cloud companies and ecosystem partners to “break the habit” of selecting the status quo and recognize the business value that we are driving with EPYC.

 

You can see more highlights and pictures from Dell Technologies World on our AMD Twitter and LinkedIn channels.


 


[i] “High Performance Computing” – the dual socket Dell EMC Poweredge R7425 delivers up to 24% improved performance vs. the HPE DL385 for containers, hypervisors, virtual machines, and cloud computing and up to 25% absolute performance improvement for HPC workloads like computational fluid dynamics [CFD].  With up to 64 cores, it offers high bandwidth with dense GPU/FPGA capability.  On standard benchmarks, the server with superior memory bandwidth and core density provided excellent results across a wide range of HPC workloads.” Data provided by ell Feb. 2018, not verified by AMD. Learn more at https://www.emc.com/about/news/press/2018/201802016-01.htm

[ii] Tests commissioned by AMD and run by Principled Technologies, Inc. running HiBench Spark, processing a 220 GB k-means dataset. AMD cluster of: 3 x "Grandstand" reference systems (chassis est. $600 ea.), each with (2) AMD EPYC 7601 SOC (AMD 1ku pricing $4200 ea), RAM: 32 x 16GB sticks ($169 ea. Samsung M393A2K40BB1-CRC per newegg.com) of DDR4 (512GB of RAM per server, 1536GB per cluster), Disk: 24 x Samsung MZ-7LM120E 120GB SSDs ($113 ea. per CDW), Network: 1 x Mellanox ConnectX-4 Lx ($332.77 per newegg.com) - for total cluster cost of approx. $52,449 - completed the test in 213.6 seconds; versus Intel cluster of:  4 x Lenovo servers (chassis est. $600 ea.), each with (2) Intel Xeon E5-2699 v4 ($4115 ea. per ark.intel.com), C612 chipset ($54 per ark.intel.com), RAM: 24 x 16GB sticks ($169 ea. Samsung M393A2K40BB1-CRC per newegg.com) of DDR4 (384GB of RAM per server, 1536GB per cluster), Disk: 24 x Samsung MZ-7LM120E 120GB SSDs ($113 ea. per CDW), Network: 1 x Mellanox ConnectX-4 Lx ($332.77 per newegg.com), HBA: 1 x LSI LOGIC 9305-16i HBA card ($399.99 per newegg.com)- for total cluster cost of approx. $65,628 - completed in 243.1 seconds. Each cluster was connected via a  Mellanox SN2700 model switch, and ran Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.3, Hortonworks Data Platform (HDP) 2.6, and OpenJDK 1.8.  NAP-23

[iii] AMD EPYC™ 7351 processor supports up to 8 channels of DDR4-2400, versus the Xeon Gold 5118 processor at 6 channels of DDR4-2400. NAP-42

[iv] AMD EPYC™ 7351 processor includes up to 16 CPU cores versus the Intel® Xeon® Gold 5118 processor with 12 CPU cores.

[v] AMD EPYC™ 7601 processor supports up to 8 channels of DDR4-2667, versus the Xeon Platinum 8180 processor at 6 channels of DDR4-2667. NAP-42

[vi] AMD EPYC 7601 processor includes up to 32 CPU cores versus the Xeon Platinum 8180 processor with 28 CPU cores. NAP-43

[vii] From Dell EMC Press release, “Dell EMC Expands Server Capabilities for Software-defined, Edge and High-Performance Computing”. The 2U single-socket Dell EMC PowerEdge R7415 is the first server platform with vSAN Ready Nodes and offers up to 20% better TCO per four-node cluster for vSAN deployments at the edge.  Based on Dell internal analysis in January 2017, comparing the projected list price cost of a similarly configured Dell PowerEdge R7415 single-socket server versus the actual list cost of a traditional dual-socket server. Actual costs will vary.